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[–] Dashippy 0 points 42 points (+42|-0) ago 

A) They really don't get this.

B) Some of them find the idea of the post office opening everyone's mail acceptable.

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[–] thuglas 1 points 12 points (+13|-1) ago  (edited ago)

People that find this acceptable are enemies of the state.

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[–] L0st_Philosopher 3 points -3 points (+0|-3) ago 

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[–] Prepackaged 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Anthony Comstock was empowered by the United States Congress to do just that.

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[–] ForgotMyName 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

I'd say it's orders of magnitude worse than allowing the post office to read everyone's mail. It's more like the post office opens all mail, scans it in its entirety and then posts it up on the web for anyone to see. Without encryption the Internet as we know it wouldn't exist. No more "logging in" to things, no more shopping unless you want your CC and personal info stolen, no private IM or video streaming. Basically this is how you ruin the Internet.

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[–] tb20 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

If probably more comparable to allowing anyone into the post office that can solve the math problem 2(3*5)+7= not complex at all, but it'll stump the most stubborn.

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[–] jwess 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Not to mention that "banning" encryption is an impossible task. Popular methods for encrypting data are already public knowledge, and steganography tools can make the encrypted messages virtually undetectable.

For example, to hide an encrypted message in an image file you could encode your encrypted message in binary, then take the least significant bit of the red RGB channel on each pixel and make it odd for a 0 and even for a 1. So if the first pixel in the image is RGB color (47, 47, 162), and the first bit of your encrypted message is a 1, then you would change the 47 red value to a 46 or 48 (even for a '1'). The color change would be nearly imperceptible, and it would be impossible to prove that there was an encrypted message hidden in the image unless you knew the cryptographic key to decode it.

Using this very primitive method, a 500x500px image could hide an encrypted message up to 31,250 bytes (250,000 pixels / 8) or 31 kilobytes. Of course you could triple the capacity by simply encoding the message into all three color channels (RGB).

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[–] safespacer 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Clearly, lossless image formats constitute a threat to national security.

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[–] deltasly 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Fuck now they're going to make sending pictures illegal...

This guy gets it though.

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[–] NoRagrets 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Is there an application out there that currently does this? I would love to communicate solely in images.

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[–] jwess 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

There are a few out there, but I would recommend OpenStego http://www.openstego.com/ because it works well and is open source. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steganography_tools for a more complete list.

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[–] Possible 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Actually it's worse. Banning encryption is like banning logical axioms. It's just math. So it's not just like everyone's mail gets read. It's like saying "you aren't allowed to infer A = C when A = B and B = C."

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[–] rwbj 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Yeah this is also an interesting point that I think hasn't gotten enough coverage as most people probably still have no clue that they are constantly using and relying on encryption for basically everything they do on the internet, let alone getting into the specifics that it's not some super secret terrorist voodoo trick but basic mathematical algorithms. It's like trying claim that applying certain mathematical methods to private digital information is illegal. I'd say that's a slippery slope, but no I think even going there is long past any sort of slope and going cliff diving without a chute off Mt. Luddite. The whole concept is just stupefying and being driven by complete top-down ignorance.

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[–] sec 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

You're more qualified to talk about this issue than our leaders.

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[–] safespacer 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

2 + 2 = 5

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[–] EllenPaosEgo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Doubleplusgood answer comerade.

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[–] bob3333 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

The news media is all over this. It's a well-orchestrated attempt on the part of the surveillance state to leverage the Paris attacks for their advantage. This morning on the radio a spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Department was explaining that the Paris attackers had used so-called "secure" messaging applications to hide in law enforcement's "blind spot." As proof he offered that they found a Playstation 4 at the home of one of the attackers. LOL. Nobody challenges these statements, or even asks a question.

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[–] luckyguy 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Exactly. Everyone having to write in hieroglyphics to use the post office sounds like some kind of twilight zone level of tyranny, which is about what we have considering they read everything they can get their hands on.

Also apparently they were using a ps4 for communication and were communicating in game. Good luck cracking that problem simply by breaking encryption. People are always going to be able to communicate things you don't like. If that weren't true there could be no criminal elements. But criminal elements do exist and always will exist as long as we have even an ounce of freedom and privacy, and you will always have the potential for terror attacks. You have to ask yourself are you willing to sacrifice 155 French for your freedoms. I sure as hell am. We've already come to the cross roads of is human life sacrificable for freedom. The answer is yes.

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[–] sec 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I reiterate:

Saying; "Lets ban encryption" is the same as saying; "Lets ban math"

Those who believe these are mutually exclusive do not even have the simplest understanding of encryption.

History Lesson:

The Caesar Cipher is a form of encryption (used by Julius Caesar) which simply offsets the letters of the alphabet. How would you stop someone from performing this on paper? How would you stop someone from performing RSA manually?

I hope everyone can see how tyrannical our "leaders" are becoming. This is nothing more than a power grab. It makes me fucking sick.

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[–] pushthis 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Post office takes pictures of all mail and boxes. Also maybe it was the postmaster general it was said all things are xrayd(most likely bulk xray with computer program to highlight and corelate picture of a package with xray of specific package that was bulk imaged.. Prolly something close). Any who, I love the USPS for its protected domestic shipments. Ups and FedEx just don't have it In them to offer the lack of theft and delivery rate. Oh, police depts request information from them. No warrant. Weather bulk info collect or specific addy or request idk.

But thank you USPS,, you don't facilitate bombs, meth,, you facilitate freedom for your mass constituents.

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