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[–] Korinthian 0 points 58 points (+58|-0) ago 

Not just that, africa is the only continent that perpetually needs food aid. Other COUNTRIES do at certain times, because of some strife or cataclysm, but the entire african continent is perpetually starving, and also overpopulated.

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[–] geovoat [S] 0 points 39 points (+39|-0) ago 

All except south Africa until something changed. Hmmm. Same climate and soil and everything else. Only difference was one thing about the government and then in a massive final proof test they changed that government and the same shit is happening immediately.

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[–] JohnVincent 1 point 13 points (+14|-1) ago 

Yeah, not so much "one thing about the government" and more "what race of people control the government".

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[–] jimibulgin 2 points 8 points (+10|-2) ago 

Let's not act like government is the solution to problems.

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[–] Colonel_Questionmark 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Yeah! And Rhodesia was producing SO MUCH food they were exporting it to other nations. Then something mysterious happened...

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[–] RoundWheel 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Portion of Africa could feed the entire planet.

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[–] Kleemin 0 points 24 points (+24|-0) ago 

They literally never entered into the agrarian age. They where still fucking HUNTERS AND GATHERERS. They where about 30000 years behing whites developmentally. Sub saharan africa was so rich with food it could sustain small tribes and it was so warm they never had to prepare for winter. No need to make plans for the future is why they never evolved into a societal age. Amd ofc the high testosterone keeps them violent which makes it harder to work together. SUB HUMANS

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[–] Acerphoon 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Do not forget that egypt (north africa, but still) was used in ancient times to feed the fucking roman empire. I don't know why they would have food shortages.

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[–] LightningAndTheSun ago 

That doesn't make them subhumans, that just means they don't fit in in white societies, just like whites don't fit in in black societies.

Africans are fine when in Africa untouched by altruist yids airdropping them food.

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[–] wraithOFlogic 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

my dream is that one day whites wake up and halt any and all aid to Africa, and it burns itself out in under a decade. also... tricking american blacks to go back there and permanently banning them from ever returning.

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[–] Empire_of_the_mind 1 point 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

What's funny is that smart Africans want the same thing and have been advocating for an end to foreign aid for 25 years. Foreign aid undermines local commerce. Ally with Africans and you can get this done.

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[–] A_M_Swallow 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Many African countries are short of food and would be happy to lease farm land to Blacks and Latinos from the USA. Make a passport part of the deal. A white person would have to organise it.

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[–] stray502 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Yes because they wont work they want people to hand everything to them. They are killing their farmers and taking over their land to do nothing. Thats what you call biting the hand that feeds you. Now all governments are gonna throw more money to Africa because they are starving. I say let them starve.

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[–] WhiteChickens ago 

They can't work, they're too stupid

[–] [deleted] 0 points 42 points (+42|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] geovoat [S] 0 points 26 points (+26|-0) ago 

I literally knew a girl ..former college classmate...who once worked with the mentally retarded as a nurse. She thought she could make a difference. She finally quit when she realized they weren't capable of Learning or changing. She just didn't understand that there really was mental limitation.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 21 points (+21|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] satisfyinghump 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Was she mentally retarded herself? Because I would think she would of learned her first year that simple fact.

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[–] BB-3 1 point 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

Is this the one you were referencing?

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[–] Mox1Harkonnen 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Fascinating article. Certainly ethnic cleansing and genocide must always be off the table when discussing human beings. Irrespective of all other considerations. I am sure we can work something out, education is the key, stone age mentality can be replaced.

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[–] CinderBiter ago 

Holy shit, no fucking wonder. You'd think someone would have shared this shit just to make it apparent what's going on... but that'd be racist. I can't believe the Europeans thought these people would make good slaves, it's a total liability

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[–] IslamicStatePatriot 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Whites, Asians and I assume probably Arabs all have neanderthal DNA to varying degrees with Europeans having the most. Africans have zero. What they do have is this so called ghost dna that is from some unknown archaic hominid that has yet to be identified. Some Asians, in the south east I believe and Polynesia have a touch of a third hominid I believe denisovan.

We are genetically different from blacks. Simple as. Fuck this we are all the same bullshit it simply isn't factually correct.

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[–] waringi ago 

There is that fucking Justin Wren guy. He has mental issues.

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[–] xiego 0 points 24 points (+24|-0) ago 

I’m not sure why but I know that not letting them starve incentivizes them to do absolutely nothing. Same in the USA, really.

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[–] TheTrigger 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Because they know that their actions don't have any serious consequences. This enables people of lower intellect to get ballsy and/or lazy.

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[–] slowcrash101 ago 

If you think our "aid" goes to "feeding" anyone, you're dreaming. Colonialism would have never worked had the natives not been willing to sell out to get an edge on their native enemy. In other words they were easy to enslave precisely because they were already weakened from in-fighting.

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[–] MikeGolf 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

We know why they need whites to tell them how to build, farm, clean, and not be apes: 1. Very low IQs. They are unable to learn 2. Very lazy. Could be that they just give up because learning is hard. 3. Cultural reasons. Africans find dancers, singers, and softball players as there perfect mate. Intelligence is not "sexy". (Fyi this cultural rot is leaching into every American culture via the (((media))). Turn it off)

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[–] TheTrigger 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I've noticed everyone's vocabulary going to shit, over the past few years, including my own. To the point where it's an active struggle to not oversimplify speech. I blame nigger "culcha."

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[–] Birdbrain ago 

I call that the niggerization of America. It is a real and on going transition.

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[–] EpiPendemic 2 points 0 points (+2|-2) ago 

My vocabulary has exploded since I started listening to podcasts all day. I listen to pseudo intellectuals with extensive vocabularies and after awhile you absorb words and they become part of your vernacular without you even noticing. On one hand It is great because I can convey and articulate my thoughts with great ease, but on the other hand, often people are intermediated or annoyed with me because I am new info know it all. I am much better at speaking than I am writing I like to shitpost IRL face to face and drop cryptic jew pills bahahhahahha

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[–] geovoat [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I can't stand to watch most tv.

Only old shows.

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[–] slowcrash101 ago 

They work hard when ripping people off is involved. You would not believe the amount of drive and hustle they have when there is the possibility of conning people out of money.

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[–] satisfyinghump ago 

People who have lower IQs tend to get bored more frequentIt's possible they are simply too stupid to get an education.

Look at the more successful nignogs in Europe or America. What do they have in common? Their skin tone is lighter, they have white DNA.

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[–] slowcrash101 ago  (edited ago)

Possibly because the feeble minded cannot create the mental associations needed to imagine a way they can benefit from information. Much easier to learn something, or do something when there is an emotional incentive. What Bruce Lee meant when he said "we need emotional content" in other words, things that we interact with have to impart emotional content for us to truly engage them and that emotional engagement 'creates' behaviors.

How many people work their ass off in school because of a fear of failure?

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[–] Birdbrain 0 points 17 points (+17|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This passage was supposed to have been penned by Charles Darwin. I am sure many will chime in to debunk him as the author. I really don't give a fuck who wrote it. It is spot on.

"Since the dawn of history the negro has owned the continent of Africa - rich beyond the dream of poet’s fancy, crunching acres of diamonds beneath his bare black feet. Yet he never picked one up from the dust until a white man showed to him its glittering light. His land swarmed with powerful and docile animals, yet he never dreamed a harness, cart, or sled. A hunter by necessity, he never made an axe, spear, or arrowhead worth preserving beyond the moment of its use. He lived as an ox, content to graze for an hour. In a land of stone and timber he never sawed a foot of lumber, carved a block, or built a house save of broken sticks and mud. With league on league of ocean strand and miles of inland seas, for four thousand years he watched their surface ripple under the wind, heard the thunder of the surf on his beach, the howl of the storm over his head, gazed on the dim blue horizon calling him to worlds that lie beyond, and yet he never dreamed a sail.” – Charles Darwin<

But we was Egyptians and sheet ju know?

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[–] Wedhro 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

If you think about what many people at stone age level of technology made with their scarce knowledge, such as Inca's stone masonry and astronomy, or Polynesians' navigation, you really wonder why the heck only black decided to stay in early Neolithic. If it's not the lack of resources (on the contrary) or the excess of natural disasters (nothing on continental level), there's only one sensible answer.

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[–] badpunsinagoofyfont 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

All other civilizations had an environmental push to improve.

Europeans, Asians, North and South Americans, and Middle Easterners all had to advance as a species to survive.

Why would sub-Saharan Africans advance when they were already surviving well enough by just doing what they were doing?

If anything, Africa was too mild and resource-rich. Their better environment worked against them.

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[–] Fagtardicus ago 

too many resources and few stressors produce niggers every time

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[–] AinzOown ago 

Beautiful.

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[–] mean_dot 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago 

It's 'cause Whitey stole all the "good" ones for they selves.

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[–] geovoat [S] 0 points 1 point (+1|-0) ago 

Lol!

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[–] Birdbrain 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

This article is long. In fact it is so long I will have to post it in several separate posts to show it all, but if you really want to understand the differences in the races, and why their behavior seems at odds with your view of the world and how it operates you should take the time to read it.

How Africans may differ from Westerners By Gedaliah Braun

I am an American who taught philosophy in several African universities from 1976 to 1988, and have lived since that time in South Africa.

When I first came to Africa, I knew virtually nothing about the continent or its people, but I began learning quickly. I noticed, for example, that Africans rarely kept promises and saw no need to apologize when they broke them. It was as if they were unaware they had done anything that called for an apology.

It took many years for me to understand why Africans behaved this way but I think I can now explain this and other behavior that characterizes Africa. I believe that morality requires abstract thinking—as does planning for the future—and that a relative deficiency in abstract thinking may explain many things that are typically African.

What follow are not scientific findings. There could be alternative explanations for what I have observed, but my conclusions are drawn from more than 30 years of living among Africans. My first inklings about what may be a deficiency in abstract thinking came from what I began to learn about African languages.

In a conversation with students in Nigeria I asked how you would say that a coconut is about halfway up the tree in their local language. “You can’t say that,” they explained. “All you can say is that it is ‘up’.” “How about right at the top?” “Nope; just ‘up’.” In other words, there appeared to be no way to express gradations.

A few years later, in Nairobi, I learned something else about African languages when two women expressed surprise at my English dictionary. “Isn’t English your language?” they asked. “Yes,” I said. “It’s my only language.” “Then why do you need a dictionary?” They were puzzled that I needed a dictionary, and I was puzzled by their puzzlement. I explained that there are times when you hear a word you’re not sure about and so you look it up. “But if English is your language,” they asked, “how can there be words you don’t know?” “What?” I said. “No one knows all the words of his language.” “But we know all the word of Kikuyu; every Kikuyu does,” they replied. I was even more surprised, but gradually it dawned on me that since their language is entirely oral, it exists only in the minds of Kikuyu speakers. Since there is a limit to what the human brain can retain, the overall size of the language remains more or less constant. A written language, on the other hand, existing as it does partly in the millions of pages of the written word, grows far beyond the capacity of anyone to know it in its entirety. But if the size of a language is limited, it follows that the number of concepts it contains will also be limited and hence that both language and thinking will be impoverished.

African languages were, of necessity, sufficient in their pre-colonial context. They are impoverished only by contrast to Western languages and in an Africa trying to emulate the West. While numerous dictionaries have been compiled between European and African languages, there are few dictionaries within a single African language, precisely because native speakers have no need for them. I did find a Zulu-Zulu dictionary, but it was a small-format paperback of 252 pages.

My queries into Zulu began when I rang the African Language Department at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and spoke to a white guy. Did “precision” exist in the Zulu language prior to European contact? “Oh,” he said, “that’s a very Eurocentric question!” and simply wouldn’t answer. I rang again, spoke to another white guy, and got a virtually identical response. So I called the University of South Africa, a large correspondence university in Pretoria, and spoke to a young black guy. As has so often been my experience in Africa, we hit it off from the start. He understood my interest in Zulu and found my questions of great interest. He explained that the Zulu word for “precision” means “to make like a straight line.” Was this part of indigenous Zulu? No; this was added by the compilers of the dictionary. But, he assured me, it was otherwise for “promise.” I was skeptical. How about “obligation?” We both had the same dictionary (English-Zulu, Zulu-English Dictionary, published by Witwatersrand University Press in 1958), and looked it up. The Zulu entry means “as if to bind one’s feet.” He said that was not indigenous but was added by the compilers. But if Zulu didn’t have the concept of obligation, how could it have the concept of a promise, since a promise is simply the oral undertaking of an obligation? I was interested in this, I said, because Africans often failed to keep promises and never apologized—as if this didn’t warrant an apology. A light bulb seemed to go on in his mind. Yes, he said; in fact, the Zulu word for promise—isithembiso--is not the correct word. When a black person “promises” he means “maybe I will and maybe I won’t.” But, I said, this makes nonsense of promising, the very purpose of which is to bind one to a course of action. When one is not sure he can do something he may say, “I will try but I can’t promise.” He said he’d heard whites say that and had never understood it till now.

As a young Romanian friend so aptly summed it up, when a black person “promises” he means “I’ll try.” The failure to keep promises is therefore not a language problem. It is hard to believe that after living with whites for so long they would not learn the correct meaning, and it is too much of a coincidence that the same phenomenon is found in Nigeria, Kenya and Papua New Guinea, where I have also lived. It is much more likely that Africans generally lack the very concept and hence cannot give the word its correct meaning. This would seem to indicate some difference in intellectual capacity. Note the Zulu entry for obligation: “as if to bind one’s feet.” An obligation binds you, but it does so morally, not physically. It is an abstract concept, which is why there is no word for it in Zulu. So what did the authors of the dictionary do? They took this abstract concept and made it concrete. Feet, rope, and tying are all tangible and observable, and therefore things all blacks will understand, whereas many will not understand what an obligation is. The fact that they had to define it in this way is, by itself, compelling evidence for my conclusion that Zulu thought has few abstract concepts and indirect evidence for the view that Africans may be deficient in abstract thinking.

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[–] Birdbrain 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago  (edited ago)

How Africans may differ from Westerners cont. 1

Abstract thinking

Abstract entities do not exist in space or time; they are typically intangible and can’t be perceived by the senses. They are often things that do not exist. “What would happen if everyone threw rubbish everywhere?” refers to something we hope will not happen, but we can still think about it. Everything we observe with our senses occurs in time and everything we see exists in space; yet we can perceive neither time nor space with our senses, but only with the mind. Precision is also abstract; while we can see and touch things made with precision, precision itself can only be perceived by the mind.

How do we acquire abstract concepts? Is it enough to make things with precision in order to have the concept of precision? Africans make excellent carvings, made with precision, so why isn’t the concept in their language? To have this concept we must not only do things with precision but must be aware of this phenomenon and then give it a name.

How, for example, do we acquire such concepts as belief and doubt? We all have beliefs; even animals do. When a dog wags its tail on hearing his master’s footsteps, it believes he is coming. But it has no concept of belief because it has no awareness that it has this belief and so no awareness of belief per se. In short, it has no self-consciousness, and thus is not aware of its own mental states.

It has long seemed to me that blacks tend to lack self-awareness. If such awareness is necessary for developing abstract concepts it is not surprising that African languages have so few abstract terms. A lack of self-awareness—or introspection—has advantages. In my experience neurotic behavior, characterized by excessive and unhealthy self-consciousness, is uncommon among blacks. I am also confident that sexual dysfunction, which is characterized by excessive self-consciousness, is less common among blacks than whites.

Time is another abstract concept with which Africans seem to have difficulties. I began to wonder about this in 1998. Several Africans drove up in a car and parked right in front of mine, blocking it. “Hey,” I said, “you can’t park here.” “Oh, are you about to leave?” they asked in a perfectly polite and friendly way. “No,” I said, “but I might later. Park over there”—and they did.

While the possibility that I might want to leave later was obvious to me, their thinking seemed to encompass only the here and now: “If you’re leaving right now we understand, but otherwise, what’s the problem?” I had other such encounters and the key question always seemed to be, “Are you leaving now?” The future, after all, does not exist. It will exist, but doesn’t exist now. People who have difficulty thinking of things that do not exist will ipso facto have difficulty thinking about the future.

It appears that the Zulu word for “future”—isikhati—is the same as the word for time, as well as for space. Realistically, this means that these concepts probably do not exist in Zulu thought. It also appears that there is no word for the past—meaning, the time preceding the present. The past did exist, but no longer exists. Hence, people who may have problems thinking of things that do not exist will have trouble thinking of the past as well as the future.

This has an obvious bearing on such sentiments as gratitude and loyalty, which I have long noticed are uncommon among Africans. We feel gratitude for things that happened in the past, but for those with little sense of the past such feelings are less likely to arise.

Why did it take me more than 20 years to notice all of this? I think it is because our assumptions about time are so deeply rooted that we are not even aware of making them and hence the possibility that others may not share them simply does not occur to us. And so we don’t see it, even when the evidence is staring us in the face.

Mathematics and maintenance

I quote from an article in the South African press about the problems blacks have with mathematics: “[Xhosa] is a language where polygon and plane have the same definition . . . where concepts like triangle, quadrilateral, pentagon, hexagon are defined by only one word.” (“Finding New Languages for Maths and Science,” Star[Johannesburg], July 24, 2002, p. 8.)

More accurately, these concepts simply do not exist in Xhosa, which, along with Zulu, is one of the two most widely spoken languages in South Africa. In America, blacks are said to have a “tendency to approximate space, numbers, and time instead of aiming for complete accuracy.” (Star, June 8, 1988, p.10.) In other words, they are also poor at math. Notice the identical triumvirate—space, numbers, and time. Is it just a coincidence that these three highly abstract concepts are the ones with which blacks—everywhere—seem to have such difficulties?

The entry in the Zulu dictionary for “number,” by the way—ningi—means “numerous,” which is not at all the same as the concept of number. It is clear, therefore, that there is no concept of number in Zulu.

White rule in South Africa ended in 1994. It was about ten years later that power outages began, which eventually reached crisis proportions. The principle reason for this is simply lack of maintenance on the generating equipment. Maintenance is future-oriented, and the Zulu entry in the dictionary for it is ondla, which means: “1. Nourish, rear; bring up; 2. Keep an eye on; watch (your crop).” In short, there is no such thing as maintenance in Zulu thought, and it would be hard to argue that this is wholly unrelated to the fact that when people throughout Africa say “nothing works,” it is only an exaggeration.

The New York Timesreports that New York City is considering a plan (since implemented) aimed at getting blacks to “do well on standardized tests and to show up for class,” by paying them to do these things and that could “earn [them] as much as $500 a year.” Students would get money for regular school attendance, every book they read, doing well on tests, and sometimes just for taking them. Parents would be paid for “keeping a full-time job . . . having health insurance . . . and attending parent-teacher conferences.” (Jennifer Medina, “Schools Plan to Pay Cash for Marks,” New York Times, June 19, 2007.)

The clear implication is that blacks are not very motivated. Motivation involves thinking about the future and hence about things that do not exist. Given black deficiencies in this regard, it is not surprising that they would be lacking in motivation, and having to prod them in this way is further evidence for such a deficiency.

The Zulu entry for “motivate” is banga, under which we find “1. Make, cause, produce something unpleasant; . . . to cause trouble . . . . 2. Contend over a claim; . . . fight over inheritance; . . . 3. Make for, aim at, journey towards . . . .” Yet when I ask Africans what banga means, they have no idea. In fact, no Zulu word could refer to motivation for the simple reason that there is no such concept in Zulu; and if there is no such concept there cannot be a word for it. This helps explain the need to pay blacks to behave as if they were motivated.

The same New York Times article quotes Darwin Davis of the Urban League as “caution[ing] that the . . . money being offered [for attending class] was relatively paltry . . and wondering . . . how many tests students would need to pass to buy the latest video game.”

Instead of being shamed by the very need for such a plan, this black activist complains that the payments aren’t enough! If he really is unaware how his remarks will strike most readers, he is morally obtuse, but his views may reflect a common understanding among blacks of what morality is: not something internalized but something others enforce from the outside. Hence his complaint that paying children to do things they should be motivated to do on their own is that they are not being paid enough.

In this context, I recall some remarkable discoveries by the late American linguist, William Stewart, who spent many years in Senegal studying local languages. Whereas Western cultures internalize norms—“Don’t do that!” for a child, eventually becomes “I mustn’t do that” for an adult—African cultures do not. They rely entirely on external controls on behavior from tribal elders and other sources of authority. When Africans were detribalized, these external constraints disappeared, and since there never were internal constraints, the results were crime, drugs, promiscuity, etc. Where there have been other forms of control—as in white-ruled South Africa, colonial Africa, or the segregated American South—this behavior was kept within tolerable limits. But when even these controls disappear there is often unbridled violence.

Stewart apparently never asked why African cultures did not internalize norms, that is, why they never developed moral consciousness, but it is unlikely that this was just a historical accident. More likely, it was the result of deficiencies in abstract thinking ability.

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[–] Birdbrain 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

How Africans may differ from Westerners cont 2

One explanation for this lack of abstract thinking, including the diminished understanding of time, is that Africans evolved in a climate where they could live day to day without having to think ahead. They never developed this ability because they had no need for it. Whites, on the other hand, evolved under circumstances in which they had to consider what would happen if they didn’t build stout houses and store enough fuel and food for the winter. For them it was sink or swim.

Surprising confirmation of Stewart’s ideas can be found in the May/June 2006 issue of the Boston Review, a typically liberal publication. In “Do the Right Thing: Cognitive Science’s Search for a Common Morality,” Rebecca Saxe distinguishes between “conventional” and “moral” rules. Conventional rules are supported by authorities but can be changed; moral rules, on the other hand, are not based on conventional authority and are not subject to change. “Even three-year-old children . . . distinguish between moral and conventional transgressions,” she writes. The only exception, according to James Blair of the National Institutes of Health, are psychopaths, who exhibit “persistent aggressive behavior.” For them, all rules are based only on external authority, in whose absence “anything is permissible.” The conclusion drawn from this is that “healthy individuals in all cultures respect the distinction between conventional ... and moral [rules].”

However, in the same article, another anthropologist argues that “the special status of moral rules cannot be part of human nature, but is . . . just . . . an artifact of Western values.”

Anita Jacobson-Widding, writing of her experiences among the Manyika of Zimbabwe, says: “I tried to find a word that would correspond to the English concept of ‘morality.’ I explained what I meant by asking my informants to describe the norms for good behavior toward other people. The answer was unanimous. The word for this was tsika. But when I asked my bilingual informants to translate tsika into English, they said that it was ‘good manners’ . . . .”

She concluded that because good manners are clearly conventional rather than moral rules, the Manyika simply did not have a concept of morality. But how would one explain this absence? Miss Jacobson-Widding’s explanation is the typical nonsense that could come only from a so-called intellectual: “the concept of morality does not exist.” The far more likely explanation is that the concept of morality, while otherwise universal, is enfeebled in cultures that have a deficiency in abstract thinking.

According to now-discredited folk wisdom, blacks are “children in adult bodies,” but there may be some foundation to this view. The average African adult has the raw IQ score of the average 11-year-old white child. This is about the age at which white children begin to internalize morality and no longer need such strong external enforcers.

Gruesome cruelty

Another aspect of African behavior that liberals do their best to ignore but that nevertheless requires an explanation is gratuitous cruelty. A reviewer of Driving South, a 1993 book by David Robbins, writes:“

Victim of Rwandan violence.

A Cape social worker sees elements that revel in violence . . . . It’s like a cult which has embraced a lot of people who otherwise appear normal. . . . At the slightest provocation their blood-lust is aroused. And then they want to see death, and they jeer and mock at the suffering involved, especially the suffering of a slow and agonizing death.” (Citizen[Johannesburg], July 12, 1993, p.6.)

There is something so unspeakably vile about this, something so beyond depravity, that the human brain recoils. This is not merely the absence of human empathy, but the positive enjoyment of human suffering, all the more so when it is “slow and agonizing.” Can you imagine jeering at and mocking someone in such horrible agony?

During the apartheid era, black activists used to kill traitors and enemies by “necklacing” them. An old tire was put around the victim’s neck, filled with gasoline, and—but it is best to let an eye-witness describe what happened next:

“The petrol-filled tyre is jammed on your shoulders and a lighter is placed within reach . . . . Your fingers are broken, needles are pushed up your nose and you are tortured until you put the lighter to the petrol yourself.” (Citizen; “SA’s New Nazis,” August 10, 1993, p.18.)

The author of an article in the Chicago Tribune, describing the equally gruesome way the Hutu killed Tutsi in the Burundi massacres, marveled at “the ecstasy of killing, the lust for blood; this is the most horrible thought. It’s beyond my reach.” (“Hutu Killers Danced In Blood Of Victims, Videotapes Show,” Chicago Tribune , September 14, 1995, p.8.), The lack of any moral sense is further evidenced by their having videotaped their crimes, “apparently want[ing] to record ... [them] for posterity.” Unlike Nazi war criminals, who hid their deeds, these people apparently took pride in their work.

In 1993, Amy Biehl, a 26-year-old American on a Fulbright scholarship, was living in South Africa, where she spent most of her time in black townships helping blacks. One day when she was driving three African friends home, young blacks stopped the car, dragged her out, and killed her because she was white. A retired senior South African judge, Rex van Schalkwyk, in his 1998 book One Miracle is Not Enough, quotes from a newspaper report on the trial of her killers: “Supporters of the three men accused of murdering [her] . . . burst out laughing in the public gallery of the Supreme Court today when a witness told how the battered woman groaned in pain.” This behavior, Van Schalkwyk wrote, “is impossible to explain in terms accessible to rational minds.” (pp. 188-89.)

These incidents and the responses they evoke—“the human brain recoils,” “beyond my reach,” “impossible to explain to rational minds”—represent a pattern of behavior and thinking that cannot be wished away, and offer additional support for my claim that Africans are deficient in moral consciousness.

I have long suspected that the idea of rape is not the same in Africa as elsewhere, and now I find confirmation of this in Newsweek:

“According to a three-year study [in Johannesburg] . . . more than half of the young people interviewed—both male and female—believe that forcing sex with someone you know does not constitute sexual violence. . . . [T]he casual manner in which South African teens discuss coercive relationships and unprotected sex is staggering.” (Tom Masland, “Breaking The Silence,” Newsweek,July 9, 2000.)

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[–] SearchVoat ago 

This comment was linked from this v/whatever submission by @Dontpanic.

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[–] goatsandbros 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Everyone knows, but most aren't honest about it.

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[–] Race_War_Now 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Yup, most either blame it on other things or simply do not consciously think about the why's in the first place.

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