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[–] Professor_de_la_Paz 1 points 26 points (+27|-1) ago 

My main concern is that we get overconfident. Never get over confident for any reason.

[–] CapinBoredface 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

When I was little, maybe 6, I got into a fight with my older brother. He beat the shit out of me and I cried.

My oldest brother sat me down and told me "Never go into a fight expecting not to get hurt."

That stuck with me ever since. You can be confident in yourself and know that you aren't coming out clean at the end.

[–] Professor_de_la_Paz 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Oh hell yeah, that is the truth. We've had this talk a few times here - no one wins a fight. The very best you could hope for is seriously bruised knuckles that will hurt like hell for days.

[–] midnightblue1335 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

"The way of the warrior is resolute acceptance that he may die." ~Miyamoto Musashi

When a man fights, and he is truly ready to die, he is a dangerous adversary- he's automatically willing to go further, fight harder than the guy who is afraid to die or get his nose broken or whatever.

[–] Professor_de_la_Paz 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I learned that quote as the "...resolute acceptance of death."

[–] Plant_Boy 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

That's why the states lost against Vietnam.

[–] midnightblue1335 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

False. Overconfidence played a role in prolonging the war, but we lost the war at home, not in 'Nam. The American people were forcing our military to fight with one hand tied to their nuts, while the enemy used whatever means necessary to defeat us. That's the primary thing that lost us the war.

We wouldn't execute suspected VC 'civilians' for fear of the media backlash. The media was more powerful than our military, and the media was aligned AGAINST the USA at that time, as well.