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[–] Computergeek01 8 points -4 points (+4|-8) ago  (edited ago)

Number bonds are easy though? It teaches the kid to memorize the groupings instead of counting on their fingers like a lot of you morons are still doing and it instinctively teaches subtraction at the same time. For example, the number bonds for 5 are 2 and 3, or 4 and 1. By visualizing these groupings early on the child learns to associate 2, 3 and 5 for example and then when they see 5 - 3, the 2 pops right into their head. It's like Factoring, but for addition. Honestly there is nothing so complicated about any of this that someone with at least a 3rd grade reading level would have trouble.

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[–] NoisyCricket 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This logic is well covered in more traditional methods (number trees, finger multiples, and LCD, for example) which don't distract with coloring and other idiocy provided here. What you're saying is that this poorly teaches, having replaced, what more traditional methods innately cover and fundamentally require before progression is otherwise allowed. Which actually is what one expects from Common Core.

Surely this is partly explained by the ever dropping average IQ since the 1970s; causal rather than effect.

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[–] Computergeek01 2 points -1 points (+1|-2) ago 

I don't remember "finger multiples", but CC incorporates the other two in this lesson in fact. Hell, you're looking at a number tree in this post, the only difference is that it's a much smaller set then what you probably remember. It's kind of funny that you would attack the coloring stuff, based on the kids hand-writting this is like first grade where coloring books and crayons are still very much part of the lesson plan.

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[–] weezkitty 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Number bonds are easy though? It teaches the kid to memorize the groupings instead of counting on their fingers like a lot of you morons are still doing and it instinctively teaches subtraction at the same time. For example, the number bonds for 5 are 2 and 3, or 4 and 1. By visualizing these groupings early on the child learns to associate 2, 3 and 5 for example and then when they see 5 - 3 as a simple example the 2 pops right into their head. It's like Factoring,

Fair enough. But what the fuck does the rest of it mean then? None of it is obvious at any reading level

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[–] Computergeek01 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

That's because you're just seeing the assignment. If you were to look at the textbook or even the kids notes it gets more clear.

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[–] Reverse-Flash 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Gee, thanks for stopping by with your monthly comment. This is one of your best.

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[–] watts2db 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

after you defined terms like number bonds then yes it makes more sense. however the way the problem instruction was written it was unlike your post nonsensical (to be clear your comment makes sense but the homework problem as written does not)