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[–] greenman1 0 points 67 points (+67|-0) ago 

i've watched this whole thing before, really worth it. police are out for convictions, not justice.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Derpy-Growlithe 0 points 35 points (+35|-0) ago  (edited ago)

That last part is simply untrue.

The supreme court case you're referring, Warren v. District of Columbia, only establishes that police cannot be sued for failing to provide protection to people on an individual basis. If you call 911, but get murdered before the police arrive -- your family cannot sue them for their reaction time; if you're kidnapped, and the police fail to find you -- your family cannot sue them.

But in the exact same decision, in fact in the same paragraph, it states that the police's duty is protection to the public at large; that's not saying they have no obligation to protect "anyone. At all. Ever." Additionally, they DO have an obligation to protect certain individuals who have a special relationship with them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_v._District_of_Columbia

Here's a nice article for clarification on the "Public Duty Doctrine."

http://www.policeone.com/police-jobs-and-careers/articles/4913117-Addressing-cops-confusion-over-the-public-duty-doctrine/

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[–] ThisIsCathartic 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Their job is to find people guilty of things.

Yep. This is a very relevant (if long) interview that speaks to that point in many ways. The population needs to understand this behavior is the rule, not the exception.

Joe Rogan Experience #670 - Michael A. Wood, Jr.

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[–] BuckySlims 4 points 0 points (+4|-4) ago 

This mentality is 50% of the problem. If you seriously are that much in fear of a cop, you have done something wrong. Normal people don't stress about talking to a cop, if you are afraid, it's for a reason. If you don't want to be afraid, have a clear conscience, some confidence, and don't put yourself in a shifty situation where you're staring down a cop's gun. My opinion of course, let the 'but.. But... I was doing nothing wrong' roll, you were putting yourself in a bad situation.

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[–] PM_ME_UR_NUDE_PICS 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

Sucks that our legal system is broken like this.

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[–] Wassy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thats why they just shoot first then ask questions. Then it our word vs oh wait nobody -.-

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[–] thouliha 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I watch this at least once a year, or show it to anyone who naively thinks its okay to talk to the police.

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[–] infam0us 0 points 27 points (+27|-0) ago 

Life protip: Yes, you can stay silent during questioning but be sure to say that you are using your right to the 5th amendment. If you stay silent during this process they can actually use this silence as evidence against as an admission of guilt.

"For example, a suspect must announce, “I’m going to remain silent now,” or “I am hereby invoking the Fifth Amendment” during police questioning for legal protection of silence to apply. Without specifically stating an intention to remain silent, prosecutors may portray the defendant as guilty for simply saying nothing."

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2013/06/salinas_v_texas_right_to_remain_silent_supreme_court_right_to_remain_silent.html http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/supreme-court-pre-miranda-silence-can-be-used-as-evidence-of-guilt/

Be careful out there guys...

[–] [deleted] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Tinkerdee 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

Why do we have to announce some rights, while not the others?

Are all the people getting dragged through lengthy trails forget to announce their right to a speedy trail? Oh crap I never announced my right to not have soldiers quartered in my house.

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[–] Kalivm 0 points 27 points (+27|-0) ago 

sometimes it is better to not even call them ... great times

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[–] DishingShitLikeA 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Calling the police gets you in trouble

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[–] Biplane 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This reminds me of a moment i had playing sims 2 a looong time ago. I threw a party in my sims house, i was outside chattin up the honeys and i needed to eat. I walk into the kitchen to find someone had died of starvation trying to get to the fridge. I had no idea what to do. So i called the police...cause murder. They showed up to the house and fined me 100 sim dollars for wasting thier time.

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[–] MiMx 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

right to bear arms

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[–] Odins_Steed 2 points 0 points (+2|-2) ago 

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[–] fglrx 0 points 22 points (+22|-0) ago 

Wow. After viewing mostly American content / news for the last few years, I've at least found out one thing: I'm so fucking glad I don't live in America.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] fglrx 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Still... I prefer my free healthcare, paid vacation and cops trying to help.

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[–] thejustchad 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Forgot a few of the other big cities but other than that, pretty correct

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[–] DishingShitLikeA 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

I want out

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[–] blue_mark_red 2 points 3 points (+5|-2) ago 

Believe it or not it's crappier elsewhere.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] TheButcher 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Because we can remain silent?

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[–] dddsr 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Serious questions: 1) What do they recommend, that you keep entirely silent when questioned by police? 2) If you are a witness to a crime, should you never tell anyone even if it could help someone else out? 3) Does being silent get you in trouble since now the police assumes you are hiding something?

[–] [deleted] 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Subtenko 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Is it ok to explain why you are not talking or could that backfire? Like holding up your hand to symbol the 5th, or saying you plede the 5th or saying you are comfortable only talk to a lawyer.

But if theres some serious crime I would think people would talk. Like some crazy person killing people running around. he went that way!

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[–] Kidder 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This is the most succinct and correct answer here.

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[–] ogeema 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Always remember, The policeman questioning you cannot testify in your defence ONLY in your guilt. So the question is, Why help someone who's job it is to get you to admit guilt.

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[–] yankee_rebel 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Da fuck????? Guess I missed that lesson in law school. No, you can subpoena cops to testify in your def.

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[–] Broc_Lia 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I think the assumption is that if you convince them there really is nothing wrong they might elect to just drop the whole thing and move on to someone else. Trouble with that is, they have quotas and IRL policing isn't like CSI: They don't necessarily want to solve the case so much as build a case. And if you're their best lead, then it doesn't necessarily matter if you're innocent provided they can pin it on you.

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[–] infam0us 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Actually staying silent during questioning can be admission of guilt....."The Supreme Court of California has ruled that a suspect’s silence can be used as evidence of guilt during trial."

Its pretty fucked up, you actually have to say you are pleading the 5th amendment to be safe in all situations.

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[–] Tinkerdee 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

That is incredibly messed up.

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[–] ThatFrancopoli 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

The reason you keep silent is that the police are trained in investigation and interrogation. Your emotions get in the way of common sense and you WILL say something that they can use to implicate you.

Record everything (despite what they say it is legal in public) and say as little as possible.

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[–] ThisIsntMe123 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

But don't be a dick about it*

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[–] TheManLawless 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This video completely changed my perspective on cops. I respect them, but I sure as hell don't trust them to look out for my best interests.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] KillerMech 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I know this is old, sorry for resurrecting it. I honestly believe the majority of cops get into that career field with the best intents. They also become cops knowing that, like soldiers, they will most likely find themselves in a dangerous situation for the good of others. I respect that.

I think what invariably happens though, is that they are put under the pressure of progressing their career and seeing the worst side of humanity every single day. Eventually it takes its toll and they either turn into bad cops, assholes, or drones listening to their leaders and playing the game to advance their career.

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[–] kotassium 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I've seen this video about a dozen times. Very good talk but I still disagree a bit, police are still people like you and me. I've personally experienced 2 different encounters with police where I just talked to them and got out of traffic tickets.

1) Was a girl I hit on her bike, which happened literally in front of an officer. It was a low speed hit (she actually hit the back-end of the car) and I immediately helped the girl and apologized profusely. She wasn't hurt and was appreciative that I was nice about it and the Officer just asked me if it was my fault and her and I were going to handle it. No incident ticket, I bought her a new tire and a helmet(she wasn't wearing one) and the whole thing was resolved. If I had chosen to remain silent things would have been much worse for me with the incident ticket and she really seemed like the type that would throw lawsuits around.

2) Didn't happen to me but my Dad's best friend, who remained silent after an accident as advised by his lawyer on his cell and also was told to not talk to the woman in the collision. After about One and half years in court with her suing him for all sorts of things and him ending up paying out something to the tune of 10 grand. After everything was over and she won he decided to just go talk to her and they got along really well, at that point he learned it was more her lawyer pushing the case and she agreed because and I quote "You just never even apologized, that's all I really wanted."

Admittedly the second story has more to do with talking to a victim but I still feel like not talking so as to not admit guilt applies in a way. Maybe not. My only point is that yeah, it really depends on the situation as to whether you should be talking to the police.

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