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[–] AlexanderMorose13 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This is the love our country needs to stay united and stay together. I'm prepared for when the worst happens. I will do my best to defend my neighbors as much as I can defend myself. I've lived here for 4 years. My neighbors are my family. The old couple down the street gave me a cupcake with a candle on my birthday. I was honored that they even remembered. An armed America is a safe America. Stay safe everyone, God Bless.

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[–] cattarhero 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I know that the AR platform rifles are accurate and easy to operate, but I consider them too delicate and require too much maintenance for a long term survival situation. That and the original ammo was developed as a varmit round. In fact, the military is now considering going to a larger caliber to increase stopping power. I was issued an M16 for a few years in my younger days and I wouldn't want to trust one again if I had a choice. At least back then I had an armory full of gunsmiths to keep it running for me. Now I need something more robust and reliable.

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[–] USAyyye [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Good news is that over the past 15 years, competition and demand has created a renaissance in AR manufacturing. Costs went down, quality went up, features and reliability improved, and more lethal rounds were developed. In other words, the kinks have been worked out to where a good AR can now go thousands of rounds without malfunctions, and without cleaning just lubrication.

Examples of what you can get now: hammer forged tapered barrels, stronger bolts, improved extractors, much better magazines (Magpul and Lancer), smoother triggers, mil-spec buffer tubes, slim and lightweight free float hand guards that extend out 10-15 inches, 600-1000 lumen weapon lights, red dot sights with 5 year constant-on battery life, wobble-free snag-free collapsible buttstocks, vertical or angled foregrips, pistol grips to fit every hand, and a pistol brace (instead of stock) if you want an 10-12" barrel without paying $200 for an tax stamp.

With ammo, you can now get heavier rounds like 77gr that are good out to 700-800 yards and do a nice job at CQB distances, bonded soft point bullets that are known to drop deer on the spot, hollow points, and special all-copper barrier blind rounds. And if that's just too puny, you can go 300 blackout or 6.5 Creedmoor, or step up to a 308 or 6.5 Grendel.

Anyway just saying times have changed and if you handle a good one like BCM, Colt, or Daniel Defense you'll see it's far ahead of the old M16s.

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[–] DarktoLight247 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Handguns require classes and shit in my state. I suggest going to your gun store and tell them what you want it for and they will help you. Shotgun is good to have, can get it the same day with little fuss. My gun shop got me to buy a 9mm upper and a lower separate, to get around hand gun laws and get a short barrel length and walked out same day. Slapped a red dot on and good to go. 9mm has hollow points that collapse and reduce possibility of going through the enemy and into your daughters bedroom. AR15 isn’t necessarily the best home defense gun, it’s better for longer range.

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[–] USAyyye [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

9mm carbines are great for indoors. AR15 will have slightly less penetration through multiple walls (55gr round vs 115gr) but more concussion and noise and single-shot lethality. I can use an AR both indoors and outdoors, though, whereas a 9mm carbine as a sole gun wouldn't be all that useable past 100 yards. All depends on your threats and surroundings. Glad you were able to get the upper and lower separate and bypass that retarded law.

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[–] wasupwitdis 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Good post PATRIOT very informative....however to keep it simple for most who may not have a lot of knowledge of firearms. For home defense short barrel (18-20 in barrel) shotgun why? It has a lot of stopping power it is basically a point and shoot weapon. For someone carrying imo a 38 caliber revolver why? It will get the job done. Has little chance of misfire.as you say training is essential also safety. Dont get me wrong your post is very well put. I am directing this toward those that have little knowledge or experience with firearms but still would like to feel they can protect themselves. If you feel it necessary to have multiple firearms keep in mind to keep calibers matching. You do not want to be fumbling around in a crisis situation looking for the right ammo. I have been a firearms instructor with local LEO for over 26 years. Have taught many classes to citizens and cadets. This is just a simple guideline.......

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[–] USAyyye [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thanks for your feedback. I agree that shotguns have great stopping power and the pump actions are quite affordable. There are a couple downsides that come to mind though.

The first is ammo capacity, being able to hold only 5-8 shells. Against one assailant that's fine, especially if you bunker up in the bedroom with shotgun trained on the door. Against two, maybe. Three is cutting it close. Home invasions are known to involve up to seven or eight people on rare occasion. In the dark, with movement, one is likely to miss as well. So I think higher capacity is pretty important. Better to have and not need than vice versa.

Second is people being prone to short-stroking the pump action under severe stress. That can be fixed with training but it's not as foolproof as semi-auto action. So I'd prefer a semi-auto shotgun in that case. But then you have to make sure your choice of ammo cycles the action reliably, so it's not as flexible ammo-wise as a pump action, and the cost is higher vs pump action.

Third is the spread pattern of buckshot. The size of a fist at room distance. That's tight enough that you still need to aim as carefully as you would an AR or PCC. Down a hallway you might get two foot spread which isn't bad. The issue is that any buckshot that doesn't hit the body will hit a wall and penetrate and possibly go into the neighbor's house. So up close you still need to aim with care, and at distance you'll get buckshot missing and penetrating walls. Can be fixed with birdshot but birdshot shouldn't be used for self-defense anyhow as it'll pepper a perp but not reach the vitals.

With an AR or PCC it's one round where you want it, with good penetration, and follow-up shots are also way faster and easier to control. So you have more precise application of projectiles, which means increased safety for any innocents behind/around the target.

And fourth is range. You're limited to 100 yards at best, 50 more like it. As long as society is stable and the main threat is mere home invasion, range isn't a problem. But if things go south and some psycho is taking pot shots from 100+ yards away, you'd be pinned down. Hitting a small target at that range with shotgun slugs is tough. AR with scope, no problem.

So all in all, as good as a shotgun may be, I think a rifle or carbine with a zeroed scope or red dot is overall more versatile and reliable. You can carry and store more rifle/pistol rounds than shotgun shells. You can reload in seconds and have another 30 rounds at your disposal. You can reach out to 600 yards easily with an AR, etc. That's why I prioritized the rifle or carbine.

38 special revolver, that's a question of revolver vs semi-auto pistol. Revolvers are simpler to operate and there's no slide to rack which may be tough for arthritic hands or weak hands. I guess I'd rather hand an untrained grandmother a 38 special over a Glock 19 for that reason. Downsides are low capacity, 5-6 rounds, and not being able to reload them quickly. Even the Glock 19 has 15+ rounds and mags can be swapped in seconds. I prefer being over-prepared than under-prepared, hence more rounds = better in my view. The Glock also takes 31-33 round mags which is an incredible advantage in a tough situation over 6 rounds.

Just my opinion. Thanks for sharing yours.

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[–] yellowoodneepuks 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Great piece for the un-initiated and the comments are ensightful as well- Thank You!

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[–] LibTearsNoBrakes 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Sawed off shotgun is all you need. You'll take out every motherfucker in the general vicinity.

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[–] LurkMaster 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I'll add many firing ranges allows to try various handguns before purchase. An important thing many forget is to get a hand gun that fits your hand. I have big hands and like a larger grip. Those with smaller hands may prefer smaller narrower grips. The better your grip, the less kick back you will experience.

I strongly suggest new gun owners get some practice shells. use these to become familiar with loading and unloading magazines, dry fire practice and general gun handling.

Then take time to practice, practice, practice....

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[–] USAyyye [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Laserlyte makes a 9mm laser cartridge that fits into your barrel like a round does. When you pull the trigger, it briefly shoots a laser to let you know where the bullet would have gone. You have to rack the slide each time on most semi-autos (unless the gun has second-fire capability) but for practicing at home it's an awesome training tool. That is, draw gun from holster and shoot at a light switch at various distances and from various positions. You start building muscle memory on the draw and aim, and that allows you to point-shoot more accurately when the time comes.

Just be sure to go to the gun range too with live rounds, as controlling recoil for accurate double taps / hammer pairs / controlled pairs is a skill that can only be developed with live ammunition.

The key to shooting a handgun is having a high and tight grip, both thumbs forward, arms rolled in somewhat to apply some counter-opposing torque to your grip to make it even steadier, and squeezing the trigger smoothly allowing the shot to 'surprise' you instead of your anticipating it and subconsciously pulling the aim off target with the flinch response.

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[–] AbjectDynamite 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

My only add is it would be wise to know what the law is in your state for armed conflicts. Where I'm at.. 3ft or less (and preferably much less) is about the range for a reasonable belief of risk of death or substantial bodily harm. The farther the threat is away from you, the less argument you have for realistically being threatened.

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[–] helpfulhuckleberry2 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

3 ft. seems extremely dangerous if they are armed also.

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[–] AbjectDynamite 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I know.

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