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[–] Terkan 4 points 197 points (+201|-4) ago 

"In spite of"? Perhaps you meant "because of"? In spite of means "Even though" So you'd be saying "even though many people want to switch, lets give them commands to make it easier" That doesn't make too much sense.

"Because of the sudden interest in switching from Windows to Linux..." let's give them commands to make it easier.

That one sounds much better

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[–] 2181483? 3 points 43 points (+46|-3) ago 

I came here to make sure someone said this.

Have an upvoat!

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[–] motoguy [S] 0 points 53 points (+53|-0) ago 

Yep I fucked up. Cant English on Mondays.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 10 points (+11|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] dannyduchamp 2 points 25 points (+27|-2) ago 

I think the saying he mixed it up with was "in light of".

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[–] 9-11 9 points 2 points (+11|-9) ago 

hey instead of a thread about linux commands and helpful tips, lets discuss how cool it is to be a grammar nazi and upvoat this guy over anything helpful and on-topic?

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[–] White_Raven 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I think he meant "in light of". That makes perfect sense.

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[–] hi5enigma 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

He probably meant "in light of"

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[–] Terkan 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Oh yeah that's a good one

[–] [deleted] 2 points 37 points (+39|-2) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] Caboose_Calloway 0 points 23 points (+23|-0) ago 

The average user runs into a problem every once in a while and looks up a solution on Google. The problem is that the solution is given on the command line, because this is the most unambiguous way of giving instructions. So if the user has no experience with the command line this may be pretty intimidating. This is why every user needs a bit of command line training. Just enough to not be intimidated by it.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] WhiteTigerScream 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I spent over half a day trying (and failing) to install linux mint, and this was my reaction exactly. Most of the stuff I saw was this command/line stuff and I had absolutely no clue what I was looking at. It also didn't seem relevant since I was trying to install linux in the first place, but now I realize that you can still do command line stuff in the installation-GUI. Not sure if it would have helped, but it would have been a lot less intimidating and confusing.

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[–] Kaizervonmaanen 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

But if they have a problem they might copy paste it. But by teaching it as something necessary it just makes it scary

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[–] MadWorld 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Couldn't agree more. Being able to do daily tasks for free and without breaking a sweat is very important. If they start messing with terminals right from beginning, it will most likely piss their asses off when things break. No one should spend hours or days trying to fix it.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] kyprioth 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

If I do wanna do stuff like use console commands and stuff, should I be going for something other than Mint?

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] glimmandenymf 0 points 24 points (+24|-0) ago 

kill -9 [PID]

Also, if you want to kill a program running in a window, you can run xkill and then click on whatever you want to kill.

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[–] SpaceLizard 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I prefer "pkill [processname]" if it's something simple like java or firefox. Also you should use -15 instead of -9 first to give the process a chance to shutdown properly. -9 should be used as a last resort.

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[–] woobie 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

-9 should be used as a last resort.

This is important, thanks for calling it out. On most distros I think -15 is the default, so you are usually good without specifying a flag.

One other flag that is useful imho is -1 which just has the process dump and rebuild its memory cache without having to fully restart.

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[–] ninjai 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I never use -15... Because AFAIK it's always the default. So instead of kill -15 Firefox, it's just kill Firefox. Also I never use that because 90% if the time the process never dies when just kill us issued

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[–] The_Westener 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

What is the "9" for? Just "kill [PID]" works too.

Yes, IAMA Mintn00b

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[–] anon0 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago  (edited ago)

"kill" is the slightly unfortunate name given to the command to send a signal to a process. Signals are a way for linux to interrupt a process for various reasons, like tell it to do something. Many different signals exist, and they each have a number. If the process has a signal handler for that specific signal, the program code in that handler will be run by the process. Otherwise, a default action will be taken. There is no way to handle or block SIGKILL though, it always just terminates the process. SIGKILL is the signal with code 9, that's why kill -9 sends it.

Read more about signals here
And here's a list of all signals

EDIT: To answer your original question, the default signal for the kill command, when you just do kill <pid> seems to be 15, SIGTERM, which makes sense because what this does is allow the process to quickly clean up resources and terminate itself if it cares to. Of course this may not always work, like if the process is misbehaved, or if was the middle of a sensitive action, it may have temporarily blocked the signal, waiting for it to be delivered later.

TL;DR: Try kill <pid>, and if that doesn't work, do kill -9 <pid>

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[–] Beers 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

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[–] SpaceLizard 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

-9 will send a SIGKILL signal that is pretty much guaranteed to kill he process. -15 is what you want to use if you need to process to shutdown normally

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[–] Phekka 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That's cool! I don't know how I missed xkill before, but this will be nice. I've mostly been using htop to F3 search for the process and then F9 and use my arrow keys to kill it off. This will be quicker, thank you.

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[–] Hellreaver 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

In mint and Ubuntu, I set xkill to ctrl+alt+x so it's always available In settings, under keyboard, shortcuts, add Command: xkill

[–] [deleted] 1 points 16 points (+17|-1) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

[–] [deleted] 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] defab67 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Note that grep can also be used to search for text in files:

grep "some phrase or regular expression" *

will search the text of all files in the current directory (because of *), and report which ones contain the pattern.

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[–] GreatAlbatross 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

/etc/init.d/networking restart does the same job of taking an interface up and down. Needs root/sudo.

It's not something you really want to do regularly over SSH, but it means you can restart an interface, and load new config, without terminating the session.

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[–] 2181249? 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago  (edited ago)

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[–] MobieP 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Taggin' this!

[–] [deleted] 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] fuckingkike 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

"xkill" and click the dead window with the little skull and crossbones cursor.

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[–] motoguy [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I wanted the highlight the PID process. Often times, when the name of the program is not clear, you may have to go the ps aux | grep [name] route to actually find the program that is running. It helps to know that every program has a PID associated with it.

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[–] waylon531 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

or you could just use pgrep

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[–] Kadivs 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

kill `pidof firefox`

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[–] 0x0000 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

killall can be used with a process name too, and is useful in case there's multiple instances running that's hanging up. I learned that one before pkill and has used it instead of it.

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[–] fackyuo 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

ctrl alt delete from a terminal will reboot the computer.

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[–] kaizeb 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Ha I just installed Linux Mint today and am playing with it now. I think I will hold off on the command prompt for now but will save this thread for later reading once I gain more experience. So thanks for starting this thread.

About restarting the GUI, I guess that is like killing Windows explorer.exe in task Manager when it freezes? I read in one of the startup docs about new features that you can press Control-Alt-Escape to restart the desktop GUI if it is frozen. I hope I remember this if it ever freezes.

Linux Mint is really pretty and intuitive to use. It seems to have tons of functionality out of the box. I was also pleasantly surprised to find that my everyday Office documents open in LibreOffice - that was a real unexpected bonus! Also the game I just bought - Pillars of Eternity - is available for Linux! That's the next thing I have to try out.

I do have to say that installation was a real pain and took me forever to figure out how to install it dual boot with Windows. I was able to shrink the Windows partition and then create a swap partition and root partition, but only after tons and tons of reading and scratching my head. But it installed easily and flawlessly after that.

P.S. I am an old retired guy so this is challenging and fun a the same time.

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[–] ninjai 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

In mint if you press alt+f2, then enter the letter r and press enter it restarts the GUI. When all goes to hell you gotta reisub. I remember this by calling it ree-sub. But you hold alt+print screen, then while holding those keys press r, e, I, s, u, then b. This will kill everything and reboot as gracefully as possible.

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[–] TheGreatNico 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

Raising elephants is so utterly boring. Also, only works if you are using qwerty

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[–] umilmi81 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Back in the day DOS was the operating system and windows 3.1 was a process that ran inside the operating system. Now Windows is the operating system and the command line (DOS) is an application that runs inside of Windows.

Linux is kind of like the old DOS days but better. The command line in Linux is called a shell. Both the shell and the GUI interface run as equals in the operating system. Shells are incredibly powerful. The only thing that stopped windows from being truly great was the lack of a powerful shell. Microsoft eventually release PowerShell. Some people say PowerShell great, but I just think it's weird.

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[–] freedumbz 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

sudo apt-get update

Do this once a week peeps. Learn to love it. Or you could automate it. But this is more fun.

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[–] Menche 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

That's not relevant to linux in general; apt-get is specific to debian and its many derivatives.

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[–] CurkyHangles 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

While I agree with you, considering this is a "getting started" post, I would guess that most users are going to end up in a debian based distro. A new user that is thrown into an Arch installation or has to compile something in gentoo is going to put down linux pretty quickly.

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[–] ReverendJ1 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Shouldn't you toss in a sudo apt-get dist-upgrade after this? update just updates your package list from the repos.

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[–] pepepepepe 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Sometimes you need to input confirmation of certain tasks like when you need to update a config or update your bootloader, the latter being a step I messed up so often that it was the main reason I gave up Debian-based distros. Arch Linux has a reputation for both overwriting configs and causing serious xorg problems on updates but I've never encountered either of these issues in the year plus I've been using it.

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[–] freedumbz 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

That's the fun of teaching yourself - you're going to learn different things than if you do what everyone tells you.

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