4
60

[–] demi_god_dylan 4 points 60 points (+64|-4) ago 

This is what happens when your government is run by people primarily in there 50's and 60's and live in a world where a 5 year old computer is considered old.

4
26

[–] stretched_girl 4 points 26 points (+30|-4) ago 

People in their 50s and 60s began online life. The internet didn't spring up all of a sudden from nothing at all. They were using dial up BBSes and international message networks from the early 1980s.

The problem I see is that the ones with the loudest voices are the ones who have the least understanding.

0
36

[–] yergi 0 points 36 points (+36|-0) ago  (edited ago)

They were using dial up BBSes and international message networks from the early 1980s.

Not true in execution. You would have had to been a major nerd to be doing this in the early 1980's. Most people (99th percentile) did absolutely nothing of this nature.

2
8

[–] demi_god_dylan 2 points 8 points (+10|-2) ago 

You have a valid point but you said they began online life, but since the 50's and 60's things have changed a huge amount, and our current politicians don't understand that, they dont understand what computers are capable of now. We aren't in the 1980's anymore and dial up level internet connectivity is no longer enough.

Mind you I don't blame them, when i'm 60 I wont understand any of the computer industry which is precisely why I shouldn't be making decisions on whats acceptable by the time i'm that old.

0
0

[–] jeegte12 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

People in their 50s and 60s began online life.

no, a few people in their 50s and 60s began online life.

a few people used dial up in the 80s. that's extremely significant.

0
18

[–] WakkoWarner 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

The problem is not the age, but the fact that most politicians know nothing beside politics. To become a politician all you need is support from like-minded people, and most of the times all what you really need to have support from people is throw enough money at it (ads, campaigns, commercials, propaganda, etc). You don't have to be intelligent to be a successful politician, you don't even have to have a diploma, nor have any kind of knowledge.

So we ended up having a bunch of idiots who know nothing about anything, nor care to know anything at all. And these are the results.

0
1

[–] luckyguy 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Why are we even making a legal distinction between high speed and low speed internet. Shouldn't all communications be equally free. Anything that's good for high speed interent is good for low speed internet and likewise the other way. Something dirty is going on any time that happens and that's what needs to be addressed.

Just leave the technology alone congress.

0
1

[–] umilmi81 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Regulatory Capture. Few people noticed that the cable companies where very supportive of Net Neutrality. Once the government regulates the internet they don't need to worry about new startups or competition.

0
0

[–] drdeadringer 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

in a world where a 5 year old computer is considered old

Honest question: how may weeks after manufacture is a computer considered "old" these days? Last I heard it was 6 months.

0
0

[–] demi_god_dylan 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The minute they roll off the production line there is something better to be found, but I doubt it's six months, that seems pretty long.

1
28

[–] Doomking_Grimlock 1 points 28 points (+29|-1) ago 

Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, here I am, stuck in the middle...

0
13

[–] BottomLine 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

...called a clown by the jokers, and a joker by the clowns..

0
2

[–] Doomking_Grimlock 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

God damn if that ain't the truth!

0
2

[–] jeegte12 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

just know that the clowns and jokers are outnumbered; they just have bigger sticks. we'll realize that all our smaller sticks can make one bigger than theirs, we just haven't discovered the right adhesive yet.

0
0

[–] Doomking_Grimlock 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse! What am I gonna do with it? Well, make glue out of the hooves and eat the rest I guess.

0
1

[–] drdeadringer 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

So...

  • The Joker tells the thief that there must be some way out of here; Batman says otherwise.

  • Clowns from space try to kill me with popcorn guns and blood-sucking cotton-candy wraps.

How can Malcolm in the Middle help me now?!?

0
0

[–] Doomking_Grimlock 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

...did you just make a reference to the movie I think you did?

1
20

[–] fcsuper 1 points 20 points (+21|-1) ago 

In the 70's, 300 baud was considered all that will ever be needed. "300" is a bigger number than "5", so let's make that the high speed definition. /s

0
29

[–] MotherfuckingSausage 0 points 29 points (+29|-0) ago 

The fact that a select number of seniors with almost zero understanding of today's technologies are attempting to stranglehold our Internet access, is more threatening and terrifying to me than any terrorist could ever hope to be.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 17 points (+17|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

2
-2

[–] BobbyLoblaw 2 points -2 points (+0|-2) ago  (edited ago)

So getting blown up is less frightening to you than low quality Netflix streams?

I think you are being a bit over dramatic.

0
3

[–] Professor_de_la_Paz 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Man, my 14,400 BPS modem was BADASS!

0
1

[–] NeedMoarGuitars 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It sucked using 300 baud in the 70s. 2400 was where thing started to get fun. :)

I wish consensus in this thread was "some of our lawmakers don't know anything about tech" instead of the "old people suck and don't know tech" bs. Whippersnappers, old people invented computers, and networking, and going to the moon. I'm still in awe of the slide rule generation.

0
16

[–] lbruiser [S] 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

0
26

[–] lbruiser [S] 0 points 26 points (+26|-0) ago 

Congress has struggled to understand the internet for a long time, and a group of six US senators joined a chorus of ignorance today when they submitted a letter to the FCC criticizing it for changing the definition of high-speed internet, The Hill first reported. Last January, the FCC made an obvious and reasonable decision to raise minimum download and upload speeds for "broadband internet" from a measly 4Mbps/1Mbps to 25Mbps/3Mbps. It's important that the government have a reasonable definition of broadband that keeps pace with evolving consumer use, otherwise laws governing deployment of internet according to those standards become essentially useless.

Of course, ISPs that enjoy monopoly conditions in many markets across the US don't like being told to provide better service for their customers, and from the beginning, their Republican allies on the commission panned the new definition. At the time, FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly said people could wait to enjoy 4K television for a few more years, and warned that increasing standards could lead us down a slippery slope toward a definition of broadband that supported "interplanetary teleportation."

"The letter is almost hilarious in its deep misunderstanding"

Today's letter from Steve Daines (R-MT), Roger Wicker (R-MS), Roy Blunt (R-MO), Deb Fischer (R-NE), Ron Johnson (R-WI), and Cory Gardner (R-CO) is almost hilarious in its deep misunderstanding about how people actually use the internet and what they need. The senators say that the 25Mbps standard is unnecessary because, for example, Netflix only recommends a download speed of 5Mbps for HD video, and Amazon only 3.5Mbps. (The recommendation for 4K video from Netflix is actually 25Mbps, but we suppose lawmakers agree that nobody should enjoy Ultra HD content yet.)

"Congress consistently uses ISP talking points"

The senators say they are "concerned that this arbitrary 25/3 Mbps benchmark fails to accurately capture what most Americans consider broadband," and that "the use of this benchmark discourages broadband providers from offering speeds at or above the benchmark." If these sound exactly like talking points from Verizon, Comcast, and other major ISPs, that's because they are: Comcast loves to tell Americans that they don't need faster internet, and ISPs join together every time they are about to be regulated to say that regulations will chill their future investments. Ars Technica reported that Republicans in Congress echoed ISP spin about network investments in hearings over net neutrality, but then just three months after the net neutrality rules took effect last year, Comcast posted earnings that showed its capital expenditures actually increased by 11 percent. So the idea that creating a standard will discourage ISPs from meeting that standard is total nonsense.

On a more practical level, probably everyone who has broadband knows that what the ISPs tell you you're getting isn't actually what you get. "Network congestion" and other invisible factors often deliver speeds well below an internet service plan's rating. In fact, virtually all of the major ISPs in the US, including Time Warner Cable, Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon, which collectively serve the supermajority of broadband customers in the country, reportedly deliver speeds anywhere between 1 percent and 23 percent slower than advertised. Furthermore, anybody who lives with family or roommates knows there's no way in hell that their household internet connection is being used to stream one Netflix show at a time and nothing else. Suddenly that "25Mbps" standard, which could be delivered as slow as 15Mbps or below in actuality, is also being shared by several people who are using the internet for a variety of purposes simultaneously. Once again, Congress' ideas about the internet just don't add up.

0
7

[–] drakesdoom 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

The happiest I ever was with internet service I had 6/1, but in actuality I received 6.5/1.5 all day every day with 20-30ms ping. I was also the only user.

If all service was that reliable it would be a major improvement.

0
1

[–] E-werd 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

This is a great way to get the law to pay attention to voat. Don't do this. This is bad. You posted an archive link, that's enough. It's one thing to copy an excerpt from the article, but this is the whole damn thing.

0
0

[–] BobbyLoblaw 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

"The recommendation for 4K video from Netflix is actually 25Mbps, but we suppose lawmakers agree that nobody should enjoy Ultra HD content yet." God forbid you can't stream in 4k.

0
12

[–] Pawn 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

The standard should be 1GB, that should be plenty for any future expansion.

0
14

[–] Tbear05 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Even that is still small thinking of what we could be capable of. Once we put a limitation on our technology, then that's as far as we are going to go.

0
0

[–] 1moar 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Correct.

0
9

[–] novictim 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Today's letter from:

Steve Daines (R-MT),

Roger Wicker (R-MS),

Roy Blunt (R-MO),

Deb Fischer (R-NE),

Ron Johnson (R-WI), and

Cory Gardner (R-CO)

is almost hilarious in its deep misunderstanding about how people actually use the internet and what they need.

0
3

[–] lbruiser [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

This comment really should be further up.

If you are in one of these states, vote the jackass out please. -Signed the Internet.

0
8

[–] pyres 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

They left out the part where it's only "up to 5mbps"

1
7

[–] coolmoe 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

I think its funny that NASA has a roadmap to mars and we cant even get broadband to the midwest. But then again those ISP's do help fund their election campaigns exactly for these reasons. Overcharging users for crappy internet is exactly what these guys want.

load more comments ▼ (40 remaining)