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[–] roznak 0 points 107 points (+107|-0) ago 

This comes in combination with Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise users’ ability to permanently disable automatic updates which are forced upon consumers and shows the growing divide between how Microsoft is treating consumers versus corporations.

They are lying, I cannot disable automatic updates on my Windows 10 Pro. I can only delay it for 7 days tops.

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[–] arrggg 0 points 75 points (+75|-0) ago 

Yes, they are lying. You cannot stop the Enterprise LTSB version from making connections out either. This is easily proven with wireshark.

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[–] lbruiser 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

making connections out either

Firewall rules. As far as Enterprise, WSUS and you manually check updates first. However I am not working in a Win10 environment (yet) so I might be wrong. Currently we are blocking telemetry updates, the sites that do call out (from telemetry) just in case, and are going through each update (we always did anyways) that gets pushed from our servers.

E: it seems like I may have been a little unclear. I mean a physical firewall. Not the software one Microsoft bundles their OS with.

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[–] gottobekind 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This can't be blocked via local hosts.conf ip/port blocking or various other router or software based blocking? I'm sure it has all been tried, but I'm completely out of the loop on this issue. Thanks in advance for any insights!

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[–] Vailx 0 points 54 points (+54|-0) ago 

...after that, the "later" option goes away, and it makes you racist.

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[–] ginx2666 0 points 29 points (+29|-0) ago 

Joke's on them - I was plenty racist before W10.

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[–] Oknatora 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

Aha, I see what you did there.

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[–] HoneyNutStallmans 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I AM RENDERING

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[–] iamrage 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

You can, but you need to go to services and completely disable windows updates at the root. Works a charm.

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[–] ChillyHellion 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

A lot of sources will point to the ability to set a connection as a "metered connection" which will disable "most" automatic updates from coming through on that connection; however, this doesn't prevent security updates and you can only set a wireless connection as "metered".

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[–] Troll 11 points 84 points (+95|-11) ago 

Yes it can. Install one of a 1000 distributions of Linux or FreeBSD or OpenBSD or NetBSD and MS can eat a dick.

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[–] turdovski 44 points 35 points (+79|-44) ago 

Linux sucks though for the average user. I tried it, I really really really wanted it to work as I fucking hate windows spying.

My mouse has no drivers, so i can't reassign buttons or disable the mouse led. There were some weird ass commands you could try in terminal..but ... i don't have time for that.

The display drivers are fucked so my 144hz display couldn't display at that refresh rate.

I couldn't figure out how to control the fan speed on my laptop.

I have multiple monitors with different resolutions, so need a different dpi on each screen - which windows 10 allows you to do, couldn't figure out how to do it in ubuntu or mint.

Every single one of the things mentioned has an easy to use gui interface in windows, in linux you need to use the terminal. Yes linux is powerful and great, if you know how to use the terminal, which 99.999% of people don't want to and don't have time to learn.

[–] [deleted] 44 points 72 points (+116|-44) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 0 points 31 points (+31|-0) ago 

This depends on a lot of variables. Some hardware just plain sucks to use Linux on. Ironically it tends to do better when you're using slightly older stuff - often the most cutting-edge hardware won't have drivers updated for it yet. It also depends on the distro. For example, pure OSS advocates shun any proprietary drivers, but many distros include it anyway, and while the former is philosophically pure, the latter is more likely to support the hardware.

I have heard many stories of people who installed it for their mother/grandmother/other-technologically-disinterested relative and it worked fine. I believe them, but not every story is going to turn out that way.

All that said, I'd like to know precisely when you tried it. While driver problems are part of the nature of the beast, I have not heard of a mouse that was incompatible with Linux in decades.

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[–] luckyguy 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago  (edited ago)

You are using it beyond the average user. In windows when you want to do something different you are just as likely to run into trouble. The difference is that you've had time to figure it out on windows, and what you've settled with in your environment was effected by what was easy in windows. There were likely many times you struggled to get what you want in that environment. And possibly times you've even given up. Your experience with linux just happened to be doing that with multiple things at the same time dealing with it in an environment you aren't familiar with. Average users can use linux for average things and doing non-average things takes a little more work just as it would on windows. Windows and Linux both have their few not so average things that they've managed to make easy. You never know what your system might have become if you had been using linux the last 4 years.

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[–] fackyuo 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

then you can suffer with the rest of the windows "average users"

really? you cant turn off your mouse led?! SUCH A TRAVESTY.

"use the terminal, which 99.999% of people don't want to and don't have time to learn"or deal with your shitty "im so lazy that i need to have to be spoon fed" operating system :)

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[–] darkmuffin 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

I like Linux a lot. I'd switch back to it on my laptop if I could use MS products on it. I use Outlook and OneDrive extensively between my three machines because it syncs so well, but Google tells me they're not really supported. My laptop is primarily used for school. LibreOffice doesn't support Mendeley (it says it does, but it doesn't) and my degree uses APA which is an absolute nightmare to format in LibreOffice, but a breeze in MSO.

Microsoft is really good at software but shit at operating systems.

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You might be interested in Codeweavers Crossover office. I used it several years ago for a project, and it was quite impressive. Granted, that was quite some time ago so it may be nowhere near as good now, but it left an impression on me that's lasted that long, so you may want to give it a shot to try to run Word on Linux. Failing that, you might consider VirtualBox, which is actually pretty darn good.

Just a few options you might consider.

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[–] roznak 1 points 64 points (+65|-1) ago 

By default Windows 10 Home is allowed to control your bandwidth usage, install any software it wants whenever it wants (without providing detailed information on what these updates do), display ads in the Start Menu (currently it has been limited to app advertisements), send your hardware details and any changes you make to Microsoft and even log your browser history and keystrokes which the Windows End User Licence Agreement (EULA) states you allow Microsoft to use for analysis.

Having a key logger in your Windows is just evil!

[–] [deleted] 1 points 52 points (+53|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] luckyguy 0 points 17 points (+17|-0) ago 

I think Bill Gates should keep his emails published live to a public server.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] arrggg 0 points 38 points (+38|-0) ago 

It also uses multiple hard coded IP's to connect to, so it can get around dns issues and blocking via the hosts file. It is very determined to send the information it gathers home. This is the definition of malware.

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[–] Taka 1 points 22 points (+23|-1) ago 

Try saying that on Reddit. Really. Anytime my post contains the phrase "Windows 10 is malware" I end up with AT LEAST -10 comment karma.

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[–] Vailx 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Evil is literally the default install. I bet turning it off is some DMCA violation too or something lol.

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[–] 3074655? 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

That's only in the EULA for the Technical Preview and Insiders Program. Not the main release.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 58 points (+58|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 0 points 24 points (+24|-0) ago 

Hopefully the answers are:

  • "Yes"
  • "Yes"
  • "Right away sir, wouldn't you know it, that was just an intern mistake hahahahaha"

Respectively.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Vailx 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I'm more curious how to run the Euro version whenever that comes out. I'm sure Microsoft will go through great efforts to prevent that from happening...

I'm assuming they'll just special case it for Europe, of course.

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[–] HoneyNutStallmans 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

ENTER: region locking

Coming to an OS near you

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[–] KingMortales 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Don't you remember the Xbox One? Totally couldn't change it, nope not at all...(1 month later) all changed guys!

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[–] 3dk 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

For once, the EU might be useful for something.

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[–] Sosacms 2 points 35 points (+37|-2) ago 

The flood to Linux can't be stopped either. For anyone on the fence, I've been on windows my whole life and holy shit has Linux changed over the years.

The interface is more user friendly than windows, depending on the version/style, and installing drivers has gone from hours of digging around to one simple go fetch what i need command. Open source FTW. I wish every aspect of society was open source. Utilize all those who simply want to make it better.

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[–] DolphinPiss 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

As a decades long dual-booter the biggest issues with linux are the lackluster video/music editing software and the lack of proper AAA gaming support. Once the MacOS emulator project is properly polished the only thing stopping linux from gaining a huge market share will be gaming. I don't think valve has the capitol to compete with Microsoft in that space but ill remain optimistic. I really fucking hate window$

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[–] Sosacms 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Ya, gaming is a big deal. Personally I'll limit my pc gaming to Steam and Linux only just to avoid windows and other gaming services. Maybe that will motivate developers to extend to Linux.

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I think SteamOS may (key word - may) do a good bit to fix a lot on that. Especially if they do something like license CodeWeavers' software for Windows compatibility - I haven't used it in quite some time but it was pretty good code when I did, and I think they have a game-oriented special version.

That said, I think there's one other big problem that people don't address - software. A lot of the time, the software that ships with the distro is what you get. You may get things like patches for security problems, but you're not necessarily going to be getting packages with major upgrades. This may have changed over the last several years, but I've always gotten this impression and I've used Linux for years. Under these conditions, .deb and .rpm software from other sources can be somewhat iffy in terms of support, especially if they're only made for one specific distribution (e.g. a .deb for Ubuntu may have a nasty surprise for you if you try it on Debian, or on another flavor of Ubuntu, or on the wrong version of Ubuntu).

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[–] collator 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Lack of serious editing software is the only thing that's holding me back. Davinci Resolve is available on Linux but as an NLE I'm not sure it's a contender yet.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] klongtoey 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

what's the ideal linux set-up for a notebook - which version of linux, and any particular pc/mac best suited for linux?

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[–] dijit 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Just grab linux mint, it's probably going to work and it's painless.

cheap notebooks use a lot of weirdly engineered drivers that the manufacturer writes drivers for on windows, but that's not true on Linux, so if it's a cheap laptop, your mileage may vary.

Mint can get you set up to dual boot windows in no time though.. if you don't want to take the total plunge.

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[–] TheTrigger 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

FWIW, I have an HP Elitebook and everything runs perfectly in Linux, right out of the box; even the touchscreen. Actually, pretty sure it uses less battery power, too.

My Dell Bluetooth mouse didn't need to be setup, either. It was, hilariously, easier to get working on Linux than windows. No fidgeting with drivers or anything.

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

The ideal setup for a notebook for Linux would be to buy it from the specialty manufacturers who can guarantee everything on the system will work with Linux.

If you want something that costs less, I would suggest checking out /v/linux and asking. I'd give you advice myself, but I'm a bit behind on what particular hardware does and doesn't work. However, I would suggest Mint or Ubuntu, since they seem to be some of the better distros in terms of automatic hardware support.

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[–] eraptic 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Dell and Thinkpads have very good mileage on Linux

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[–] phaither 1 points 20 points (+21|-1) ago 

When you create a product to bad, you have to give it away for free. The funniest thing, 10Million stupid people still use it

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[–] Caboose_Calloway 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

Reminds me of the banners on this old game

Jets'n'Guns for those wondering, it's a side scrolling shooter.

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

Lest anyone say "it's just system health data," "system health data" can very easily be argued to include just about any data on the system.

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[–] T8nker 1 points 11 points (+12|-1) ago 

I switched to Linux months ago, this no longer affects me

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[–] tribblepuncher [S] 1 points 10 points (+11|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Actually it does.

The next version of UEFI has "upgrades" to secure boot that mean that it no longer needs to be possible to disable in order to comply with the standard. In fact, tablet makers are explicitly forbidden from having it possible to turn off Secure Boot.

It is not unrealistic that this will affect you when you have to cough up a ton of extra cash for system firmware that ensures you have an off switch so you can boot a kernel that isn't signed by Microsoft, and it's not out of the realm of possibility that new hardware without firmware that's been disabled for "security" just won't be readily available at some point.

Unfortunately it seems like I'm the only one that ever brings up that fun little side effect of all this. Hopefully it won't come to bite us all in the ass, but I'm not optimistic.

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[–] T8nker 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

I've gotten rid of MS completely, I don't run a dual system.

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[–] pepepepepe 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The larger Linux distros like Ubuntu and Fedora are still officially supported in SecureBoot. Still not acceptable in the slightest but at least it's not hopeless.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] PM_ME_YOUR_ESSENCE 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

There will always be vendors who are willing to compete with the Dell's of the world, and offer a system that will allow booting to Linux.

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