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[–] Intestinal_Parasites 0 points 42 points (+42|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's so fucked that this is even a discussion. Planned obsolescence is such a horrible concept, followed by making it illegal to fix the device.

Why don't they just start lease programs.

[–] [deleted] 5 points 13 points (+18|-5) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] Tokyofpv 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

Wish I could do that but Buffalo have locked me out.

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[–] axiotomaton 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Why don't they just start lease programs.

Like most software you mean, according to their EULAs?

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[–] Pawn 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

lol and the whole "you bought a license, not a product" bullshit.

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[–] dalek_caan 0 points 21 points (+21|-0) ago 

Sometimes, my gadget won't work because a capacitor is bloated. I have a box full of capacitors. I think it is obviously that I change it myself. I'm pretty sure 75% or more of old electronic failures is because of faulty capacitors. I don't want to buy a new gadget with some new features that I don't need, I just want to keep my old one. It wouldn't surprise me if somebody will be sued for "illegal modifications" after replacing a component in his TV from an older, similar TV.

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[–] dabork 0 points 19 points (+19|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Congratulations, you are the consumers electronics manufacturer's worst nightmare. I bet you also make small repairs to your car when you're capable, which means the auto industry wants you dead too.

There is way more money to be made by forcing you to buy new shit. They've been doing it with cars for 20 years with a clusterfuck of sensors and computers all controlling parts hidden under plastic or completely inaccessible, and now they're moving on to the rest of the shit you buy. They're taking care of the software side with "licenses" that forbid you from making any modifications including replacing the software, one of the best examples being the current proposal in the FCC to make it illegal to modify routers and modems with custom firmware. The claim is that it will prevent people from breaking regulations by increasing signal strength, but any half-educated person knows it's really a cash grab and a chance to force you to use compromised firmware since the largest networking manufacturer in the world (Cisco) has confirmed NSA backdoors in its equipment. Then they take care of the hardware side with proprietary screws, voided warranties, threats of legal action, or proprietary parts that can't be acquired without a special license or being an "authorized" repair person (like that code you need from the dealer to program that $300 key fob for your car that you bought online for about $20. But don't worry, an authorized mechanic will program it for you, for about $250.).

Welcome to the future, where you don't own anything you buy and everything is just being licensed for use.

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[–] dalek_caan 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I totally agree with you. I was very angry when I heard about FCC.. a custom firmware can do wonders. I'm really curios and somewhat sad about how we'll can use the hardware in future. Maybe someone will have the bright idea to transform the hardware product in a service with monthly subscription..

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[–] murphytheoptimist 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Electrolytic Capacitors are probably the worst components as far as product lifetimes go. The electrolyte either gasses off or leaks out of cheap caps which cause them to fail. They are probably one of the easiest parts to replace as well.

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[–] confusiondiffusion 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

There's no urgency to replace the electrolytic because it works long enough to sell. It's so sad.

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[–] acceleraptor 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

When it comes to TV's and monitors, I think your estimate is a touch conservative. They still use cheaper, shorter lifetime capacitors because it saves them a packet. The difference in cost (retail) is sometimes a factor of twenty per capacitor ($0.20 vs $4), and they use more than a few. Source: I used to work for an electronics recycler who had a generous secondary revenue stream selling repaired tv's/monitors.

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[–] dalek_caan 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Thanks for the info!

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[–] jnrandoms 3 points -3 points (+0|-3) ago 

I hear ya

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[–] ximian 0 points 17 points (+17|-0) ago 

We also need to get away from the concept of making devices impossibly slim - that right there is an excuse for the manufacturer to entomb all compnents in epoxy. Need to repair anything? sorry its sunk in glue to make you phone thin and all held up.

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[–] ThisIsntMe123 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

I don't get why this is up for debate. The only thing that the "right to repair" should do is void the rest of the manufacturer warranty.

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[–] tanzmeister 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

"busted component called a capacitor"

Well, now I know what their target audience is for this article.

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[–] NewtAgain 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

Everyone should know what a capacitor is... i'm pretty sure that was part of my high school physics curriculum

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[–] tanzmeister 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

exactly, like, I understand tech writers speaking to a less educated audience, but come on

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[–] pangaea 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

With used or off-brand devices, replacing them is often cheaper than having them fixed I've found.

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[–] KarmaYoga 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Unfortunately are are right. Alot comes down to how readily available parts are (for instance e fails to mention how long the shipment from eBay took) and how valuable your time is.

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[–] pangaea 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

If I only paid $70 for a tablet, I wouldn't spend $90 to have it fixed. I've been through this once before.

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[–] waldojim42 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Should we have the right to repair our own electronics? Absolutely. And we do. No one stopped him. They didn't help him, but that is for a good reason.

Not everyone should do this. There are many, many, many morons in the world. Sadly, it seems, most live in the U.S. of A. Samsung, rightly, does not trust the average person to be knowledgeable enough to understand what a capacitor is, and does. At least, not enough that they would willingly tell people "hey, just go in here and replace this capacitor that stores a bazillion volts!" (yes, I pulled pulled that number out of my ass because the actual number right now is of little relevance). Too many people don't know, and would sue the moment they got shocked - life threatening or not.

And the article goes on to point out that Dell, and Lenovo give out repair guides... and he is sort of right. But BOTH of those companies are going to say the same thing about the power supplies: "No user serviceable parts inside". It has been that way for a good 20 years, at least. We haven't lost the right to repair, not yet anyhow. They just don't want to be sued by dumbasses.

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[–] idle_voating 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

We need more detailed repair guides that don't tell us lies like there being no serviceable parts inside of a power supply.

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[–] aFrenchGuy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

The thing i liked with Samsung's smartphone: it was easy to repair. Not now, with Galaxy Ax and S6, if you just want to change the charge connector, you will probably broke the screen, it's sad. iPhone still be easy to repair (i'm not an Apple-fan boy, just a technical point of view).

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[–] Lateraltwo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I mean at max it might be 4V, and besides capacitors are measured in uFarads (more commonly for small electronics). But we get your point

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[–] confusiondiffusion 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Filter caps in the power supply go right across the line voltage and are often big. They can give you a nasty shock. Usually the little ones fail first, however.

I think the real danger lies in putting capacitors in backwards, using caps with lower voltage ratings, and creating solder bridges. You can easily start a fire if you don't know what you're doing. Still, I don't see how this is a problem. If you burn your house down because you did something you weren't qualified to do, that should be your own business. We don't need the insides of our houses idiot-proofed.

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[–] Mr_Wolf 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

I always look for a fix before I replace an item, the Internet makes it so much easier now. The only thing I haven't been able to repair on my own so far is a cell phone screen.

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[–] aFrenchGuy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

My job is to repair phone and it's not so hard (except for Sony and worst: HTC). There are some good things to see on iFixit and also on youtube (just type for example: Samsung S5 Screen replacement).

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[–] Mr_Wolf 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That's the exact phone I was trying to fix, watched a bunch of videos. I didn't warm up the screen properly and made a broken screen worse.

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