[–] [deleted] 8 points 38 points (+46|-8) ago 

[Deleted]

[–] [deleted] 0 points 22 points (+22|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] ancientgoat 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

I agree - it wasn't a flaw. Facebook purposely built it in to the app. It takes extra code to 1) gather the location and 2) to publish it in an API call.

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[–] Pandameat 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

This guy understands things. @zzing you clearly didn't read the article. He used information Facebook gathered on purpose. He didn't even expose a flaw but instead pointed out what was clearly a "feature."

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[–] Spirits_ 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

True. But how long would've Facebook needed to "fix" the issue? Would they have reacted at all? It's Facebook after all, they don't give a fuck.

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[–] wesmoc 1 points 11 points (+12|-1) ago 

That is jumping to a conclusion. No one can say for certain what they would and wouldn't do. I've got no love of Facebook, but I can't give them a black mark for a scenario that never happened.

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[–] 654456 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

Then you release it. Give them a fair shot to correct it.

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[–] LordHumongus 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That doesn't matter. You send them the information. When they don't do anything with it and you release it, then they look like the fools. That's called ethics.

The guy this article seemed more interested in releasing an app than asking if the app was ethical.

It's the old "so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn't stop to think if they should"

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[–] TahTahBur 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Exactly: "QUICK! Hire this dude in PR! He'll topple what took years in a single day." -said a Tech blog.

What should have happened: "We should hire this intern because he found a huge flaw in our programming. Thank God - before anyone found out." -said HR.

It's fucked up when the glass is half empty.

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[–] Balrogic 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Closed source platforms are under no obligation to fix problems, no one can fork a fixed version to get around it. Telling them you know about a flaw opens you up to gag orders and other nastiness.

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2532533/malware-vulnerabilities/security-gag-order-against-mit-students-gets-another-day-in-court.html

Raise a big stink in public? Yeah, now they have to change it.

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[–] mr_skeltal 0 points 30 points (+30|-0) ago 

I remember reading that piece on Medium when it came out. Facebook are simply not trustworthy. They have been caught in so many ethically dubious practices that I'm beginning to suspect that they have been co-opted by the US government.

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[–] Disappointed 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

How chilling is it that you don't trust them at all and yet would trust them even less if they were in league with the US government.

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[–] ogcook 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Government has a lot more power to ruin your life or use that information against you compared to have a web company would be able to do.

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[–] shirtlords 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

More like founded by the government, if I remember correctly, didn't they get some cia money early on?

Regardless, I know the us government is going to get my data if they want it. The ad companies though? I know I can keep those guessing.

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[–] axiotomaton 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago 

He also received an email from Facebook’s head of global human resources and recruiting, who told him that his Medium post didn’t meet the high ethical standards expected of interns.

Facebook

high ethical standards

I don't even know what to say. Maybe they hold their interns to a higher standard than themselves *cough*beacon*cough*

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[–] JimBoNZ 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

I came here to post exactly what you just posted. "Ethical Standards" according to NSAFACEBOOK is shut the fuck up, get to your cubicle and let the nice man in the suit and sunglasses fuck you up the arse.

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[–] ForgotMyName 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The ethical standards drop as you move up until you hit CEO status and then you're allowed to kill lions using poisoned hooker meat from the drug-fueled snuff party you had the night before.

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[–] devland 4 points 13 points (+17|-4) ago 

If you had an intern at your company disclose personal user data and even make a chrome app for that purpose then yes, you would also break all ties to that person.

Facebook did the right thing.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 6 points (+7|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] devland 3 points -3 points (+0|-3) ago 

You're telling me that the kid saw private user data being available in the facebook api and said "yeah, sure, seems legit. might as well make this publicly available to everyone in this chrome app I'm making. yep."?

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[–] Spiritreader 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

What the heck. How naive is that?

Facebook said something along the line of:

Yes, we know we have major privacy issues, and our terms of service prohibits scraping the data. So please follow the rules and don't do it.

Nobody cares about the terms of service when they want to abuse privacy data they can get easily. The student did it for a map extension, what would have happened if somebody else discovered it who didn't have just those intentions of making a plugin.

They should've hired that guy or something. But it's more important to keep spying on users instead of fixing flaws nowadays...

So the TL;DR of facebooks response in this article is: Security and privacy flaws are protected by terms of service...

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[–] tribblepuncher 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

So the TL;DR of facebooks response in this article is: Security and privacy flaws are protected by terms of service...

IIRC this card has been played many, many times before this by many companies for a long time. Simple fact of the matter is that most companies really don't give a shit, and they'd rather sue you and pretend problems don't exist than actually fix their security flaws.

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[–] ancientgoat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I agree. They should have hire the goy. Now they risk pissing him off, and having someone else hire him.

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[–] tribblepuncher 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

To Facebook, privacy flaws are features.

I wish I was being sarcastic or snarky. I'm not.

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[–] Quawonk 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yes, features for their buddies at Big Brother.

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[–] wesmoc 2 points 3 points (+5|-2) ago 

I'm no Facebook fan, yet I didn't get what others did out of the article. From how it reads, he created a tool which scraped data from the Messenger app which Facebook claims was against their policy. Despite being contacted by Facebook to "stop doing that", he kept the app up and even went so far as to apply to Facebook (it would normally have come up in the interview process, no? Or did he not mention anything?). When Facebook put 2 and 2 together, realizing who the potential intern was as and their recent history, Facebook pulled the plug to avoid a PR fiasco.

However you spin it, the potential intern isn't exactly a shining star.

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[–] CaptSpify 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Eh, I'd disagree. It's a flaw they've known about for 3 years. If they are exposing that data, and he uses it, I don't see him doing anything wrong. They are the ones refusing to fix it.

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[–] Quawonk 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

No good deed goes unpunished.

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