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[–] draaaak 1 points 52 points (+53|-1) ago 

Linux here I come...

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[–] NNdmt 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

I jumped ship a while ago, the constant having to keep up with anti-malware tools was becoming a pain. Initial configuration can be difficult occasionally, but imo its worth it. Linux mint is pretty good for general desktop use

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[–] draaaak 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Mint aye, I'll check it out.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] DungeonMaster 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Im just going to hop on this top comment and shill for my favorite distro: Manjaro.

Manjaro is just as easy to use and install as mint, but better for gaming due to the ability to COMPLETELY disable the compositor (a thing that messes up games) as a stock feature, which Mint with Cinnamon doesnt have. (you can disable it for sullscreen apps, but everyone knows windowed fullscreen is better and many games HAVE to run windowed)

not only that, but its based on Arch instead of Ubuntu, which is almost unanimously agreed upon as being the better version of linux.

It also stays up to date all the time, unlike Mint where you install a specific version, and then have to install your updates as big patches all at once. Arch has a rolling release that always updates little bits at a time.

As a personal anecdote, I find it runs faster and smoother than mint, and has more features. It also gives me better FPS in games, and works better with WINE.

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[–] TropicalJupiter 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Use the edge drivers and know how set your CPU governers to performance.nobody tells you this shit.

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[–] draaaak 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You're right, I have never heard this before, but there's a lot about Linux I have never heard.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] tomlinas 1 points 35 points (+36|-1) ago 

No comments at all? This is a pretty well written article. The only part I'm curious about is how they think the OS has the power to bypass a proxy -- unless there's some host-guest magic going on in their VM setup, that shouldn't be possible if they don't want it to be. It's completely possible to lock traffic into a proxy or nothing scenario.

It would be nice if there was a more concrete answer about what exactly the requests to Bing are for...

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[–] Disappointed 0 points 32 points (+32|-0) ago 

I just think there's no point using 10 at this point, so i don't have much to say on it.

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[–] riposte 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

about to switch to linux. I'll keep a bootable drive with win7 for gaming however.

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[–] maegris 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

if the Windows OS is setting the proxy, and nothing preventing non-proxied traffic, the software could be written to ignore proxy information/stupid enough not to know how to use it. Which interestingly could be a way to block this traffic by using a proxy and blocking normal 80/443 traffic/all-traffic

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[–] tomlinas 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Ah, I guess that makes sense. My fault for thinking from an Enterprise point of view where if I was installing a proxy or other network traffic modifier I'd also be making sure it couldn't be bypassed :P

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[–] kevdude 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I will not be upgrading to Windows 10. Not going to happen.

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[–] zoetry 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Windows 10 bypasses hosts file rules as well.

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[–] relevantinfoman 0 points 23 points (+23|-0) ago 

I want to know if people are going to start tracking the amount of data companies are sending against their will/without their consent and send them a bill for data that went over their bandwidth caps for that month. Let the megacorporations duke it out with each other.

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[–] Yollasho 0 points 17 points (+17|-0) ago 

Or the "mega corporations" charge you more to not send your data.

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[–] kevdude 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Sounds like an app that would pay for itself.

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[–] dalek_caan 1 points 20 points (+21|-1) ago 

I got it, I got it. if you care about privacy don't use Win 10, otherwise do the upgrade and that's it.

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[–] thijser 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

If you care about privacy you should also watch the updates of windows 7 and 8 as those also received updates that enable the spying.

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[–] SolarBaby 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Do you have any more info on this and how I reverse it? MS just installed a bunch of updates and some of them were "compatibility for future updates" which I suspected something was up about. If you have any info on that please share so I can reverse their evil.

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[–] king_kraken 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Those already spy on you aswell.

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[–] FairyOriginal 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Everybody smile pretty for the ... group photo !!

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[–] dalek_caan 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I'm aware of it. As far as I know, these updates only affect CEIP participants, but I'm pretty sure future updates will don't..

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[–] Quawonk 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You don't think the other ones are secretly spying on you as well? Come on.

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[–] JesTheRed 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago 

Not only has W10 convinced me not to ever use W10, but seeing how MS has decided to simply get naked and crawl in bed with Uncle Sam I'm now stripping the last vestiges of W7 out of my house too. Shitty companies just can't be trusted.

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[–] Quawonk 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

General rule: the bigger the company, the cozier they are with Big Brother.

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[–] insanityfarm 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The sad truth is, the rules of the corporatism game mean companies only get that big because of government. On its own merit, without the protectionist "benefits" the state offers, a company could never grow to the size and scope of the megacorporations we have today. Of course, you can't take without giving something in return. Once a company drinks the government Kool-Aid it's on the hook. "You scratch our back, we'll scratch yours..."

[–] [deleted] 1 points 12 points (+13|-1) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

[–] [deleted] 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] NotAnUndercoverCop 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Hide my ass gave up lulz sec. Has PIA ever been known to 'give up' anyone?

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[–] shirtlords 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Intel is also their bitch.

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[–] diodine 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This article is bullshit. I just got up and this is gonna be a mess, but here goes:

  • There are no negative rings. The security descriptor (CPL, stored in CS register) is 2 bits wide. -2 to 3 would require a 3rd bit.
  • Processors literally can not run these 2 extra processes at once. It would require 2 extra CPU cores that are hidden from the OS so that it does not attempt to hijack them.
  • "Memory Controller Hub" is not even a thing. It's called the Memory Management Unit and it has been inside the CPU all the way since the 286 - not to mention there weren't any MMUs available for the original 8086. You can't read the 0x1FF80000 because every OS ever has paging and is preventing you from reading it yourself.
  • This "creepy janitor" is actually a set of ASICs on the motherboard itself. They don't run code - they're a complex set of transistors who have no knowledge of code. These have always existed because the original 8086 did not have enough pins on its 40 pin die to support every possible I/O module. x86 has always been a huge mess of backwards compatibility...
  • There is no module to map this "creepy janitor"'s code into 0x1FF80000. If there was, you could desolder the ROM chip from the motherboard and read it yourself.
  • Mapping code into such a low region in memory is bound to cause countless problems for operating systems. Every OS would have to take a long step over this to avoid it.
  • Intel HATES memory mapped I/O so much. If anything, these registers would be accessed using IN/OUT.
  • If an attacker really wanted to do damage, they could modify the microcode. Thing is though, the data is encrypted from Intel/AMD and is decrypted by the CPU when the BIOS sends it, so we don't know how to hack it or if it's been hacked or if it's doing bad things directly from intel. There's a great PoC on page 18 by Defuse Security on how malicious microcode can break Linux's secure random number generator. In theory microcode can do anything, but only Intel knows how to exploit it.

EDIT: The concept is there, but the article is very very wrong. In reality, it allows you to hide code - yet another crevice in the rock wall that is rootkit. The article makes it out to be a CPU problem when in reality it is a motherboard problem (more specifically one of the controllers on the board).

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[–] Gamio 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Not really, I don't doubt thats a part of it but I'd say the main incentive for this kind of crap is good old fashioned marketable data. Microsoft has wanted to beat Google pretty badly for the last 5~10 years, Google is a "your targeted advert here" company that happens to run several services including a web search, Microsoft wants to get a piece of that action and if possible keep their biggest competitor as locked out as possible.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] FairyOriginal 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

...Who let the dawg out ?!?!

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[–] binglederry 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

I have decided to skip Windows 10 until all this privacy violating bullshit is uncovered and properly disabled. Felt a bit like playing whack-a-mole.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] xXx_yolo-swagbl4ze_x 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago 

If it has the newest update, no. It's uninstallable though.

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[–] B00k3r_D3w1tt 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Do you have the KB number for it?

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[–] DungeonMaster 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Win8 was never OK...

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