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[–] jnr 0 points 22 points (+22|-0) ago 

Also, you have to accept the license terms before creating an account. So this is not an issue of using a Microsoft account instead of a local account. This is also not conditional on using their cloud storage. The policy covers the entire device and all connected devices.

They built a front door into the OS and you can't lock it. You either accept it, or don't install it.

Obviously there are things like encryption and firewalls people can use to try and circumvent, but that doesn't make this okay.

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[–] tribblepuncher 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

that doesn't make this okay.

I'm surprised there seem to be a lot of people who don't get this. Especially people who want to close holes with registry hacks - those are the sort of things that forced updates obliterate as security holes.

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[–] jnr 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

It's become very easy to shrug these things off. I admit I've done it before. It's hard to turn down a free OS, especially something akin to getting Win7 when it first came out. That's what Microsoft and companies alike are banking on - apathy.

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[–] bisaya 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I think those registry hacks are more placebos than anything else at this point.

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[–] ITACHI 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

So if I don't use a MS account, they'll stop spying on me?

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[–] jnr 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

There's no guarantee what they'll do. To be fair, the snippet quoted from the privacy policy includes some conditions, like abiding by legal request to disclose the information. But they also include language that's vague like, "enforcing the terms governing the use of the services."

How does Microsoft enforce the terms by looking at your private data? How do they know they need to look at the data? Do they just randomly check to see if people are using the software correctly? What is the mechanism they use to look at this data?

The policy in an of itself is not limited to Microsoft accounts, so local accounts have just as much potential to be spied on.

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[–] Foobarbaz 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

So this is not an issue of using a Microsoft account instead of a local account.

As best as I can tell this is not the case otherwise the government and businesses would be at risk. Local accounts should be safe from this provided you don't enable the appropriate services.

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[–] jnr 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I would imagine they'd handling things differently for enterprise versions. Even if they aren't specifically doing this for local accounts the core issue is that they will access, disclose and/or preserve your personal files under certain conditions. They've made it part of their blanket privacy policy, not something that specifically states "when stored on our servers." It's outlandish at best, and to make users accept this policy just to use the entire OS is absurd.