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[–] Wonderboy 52 points 258 points (+310|-52) ago  (edited ago)

I really don't think so. Most of the things people are getting upset over are, to be perfectly honest, blown out of proportion.

From a different thread:

•The P2P is **ONLY **to share updates via your OWN NETWORK.

•Telemetry - this is nothing new, Microsoft has collected logs and crash data from their OSes and Software for years. Even Apple does it with OSX. But if you are that paranoid download NTLite and remove Asimov.

•Real-Time Protection is there for a reason, to protect people. You can turn it off for varying intervals but yes it turns back on automatically to keep you protected. If you install a 3rd Party Antivirus like Trend Micro, Avast, etc. Windows 10 automatically disables Windows Defender.

•Cortana is a Web-Based service. The volume of data needed to make it work properly would not fit on most computers. But if you are that paranoid you can turn Cortana and Web Search off. On the taskbar click on the Magnifier icon, then click the Sandwich Icon top left, then click settings and turn Cortana and Web Search off. Then right click an empty space on the taskbar, click search and then hidden.

•Content-Suggestions - Yes the ads are there, but you can go to Settings>Privacy>Manage my Microsoft advertising and other personalization info - This will open a webpage in your default browser. Once signed in you can turn off Browser-Ads (from Microsoft), and OS ads (from Microsoft)

•WiFi Sense - This is really easy to turn off, go to Settings>Network & Internet>Manage Wi-Fi Settings and turn off "Connect to networks shared by my contacts

•Automatic Updates (Forced Updates) - these can easily be turned off as well - go to Settings>Network & Internet> Advanced Options and turn on "Set as metered connection". This will have to be done for every network you connect to so don't forget.

Edit: There's a lot of talk about MS "keylogging" everything we type. That's just not true as there is no evidence of any key logger in the files (they're pretty easy to spot seen as every antivirus is has heuristics designed to spot these things). What it does do though is use phrases and words you type into things such as Cortana or your browser and feed them back to MS to improve autocomplete and the relevance of Cortana answers. This is also the same as what Google and Apple do with their products. You can also opt out of sending feedback to MS by going 'settings > privacy > feedback & diagnostics'.

I get that everyone has their backs up about CISA and an Orwellian society but lets take things based on evidence rather than drawing conclusions from speculation and possibly even the desire to make companies seem as evil as possible at the moment.

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[–] Redeyedjedi 6 points 41 points (+47|-6) ago 

Reading my emails is not acceptable. Changing my settings back to what you want is not acceptable. This is not blown out of proportion.

I will be going back to win 7. If this doesnt get fixed i go linux.

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[–] TalkingAnimal 2 points 9 points (+11|-2) ago 

What email service do you use, and why do you think they don't read your emails?

[–] [deleted] 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] ximian 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Dint' Microsoft create an entire campaign vilifying google about "reading your emails"

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[–] mrcanard 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago  (edited ago)

There is still about 41/2 years left on 7. When Microsofts business starts slipping away they'll suddenly become more reasonable.

edit: care to provide a comment to go with the downvoat.

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[–] ineedbettername 33 points 29 points (+62|-33) ago 

Upvoating for visibility and to combat the spread of disinformation.

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[–] xaric 3 points 50 points (+53|-3) ago  (edited ago)

I like the content Wonderboy posted. And I'd like to point out that for all those who "debunked" Windows 10 spying on you with the preview version (who swore those features would be removed), guess what? They weren't.

Still no mention of the Windows 10 key logging feature. That alone is scary and I haven't seen that addressed by those combating disinformation.

I have worked to create BI platforms for companies in the past, and while the information Microsoft is collecting (with the exception of logging your keystrokes) is seemingly benign, I'd like to point out that mashing that information together can paint a very detailed picture of you. And that picture is available to any advertiser who is willing to pay. Example: Even if your physical address wasn't ever shared with Microsoft, your Bing searches and such alone could reveal enough information that, when assembled using smart data analysis, could pinpoint where you live. An example of this can been seen here where a Harvard professor identified 40% of "anonymous" participants in a high-profile DNA study case.

With information collecting like this, it makes it even easier. And here is where it really rubs me the wrong way: The DOJ feels it doesn't need a warrant to get to this information. If it is being collected by a cloud service, then the DOJ feels they have a right to it. In contrast, if that information were to remain on your computer only, law enforcement must obtain a warrant to get it.

Are people making this out to be a "the sky is falling" scenario? Yes. But I don't think we should ignore the implications of what is happening slowly but surely.

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[–] RevanProdigalKnight 1 points 10 points (+11|-1) ago 

I missed "to combat" the first time I read your comment, it made for an entirely different meaning. Perhaps I should get my eyes checked... again.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

[–] [deleted] 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] Wonderboy 4 points -3 points (+1|-4) ago 

If you choose to use another antivirus (even free) the real-time protection is disabled. It's only there if you have nothing protecting you at all, in which case I can't understand your objection to a base level of protection higher than 0.

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[–] fuckthisshitagain [S] 4 points 6 points (+10|-4) ago 

Thanks, this is really informative.

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[–] plankO 3 points 112 points (+115|-3) ago 

Linux has ad free solitaire btw

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[–] umilmi81 3 points 18 points (+21|-3) ago 

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[–] insert_name 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

I'm surprised there is an actual clip out there that perfectly describes the situation.

Ah the internet...

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[–] HermanTheGerman 2 points 5 points (+7|-2) ago 

Windows 10 too, just not from Microsoft.

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[–] lbruiser 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

In light of this ad solitaire shit, you know TONS of malware authors are going to target this opportunity to infect people's PC with a "Ad free, free solitaire game". Poor grandmas everywhere are going to get infected.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

[Deleted]

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[–] plankO 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

don't forget cards.dll

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[–] escape 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

So does Windows...?

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[–] writingandsmiting 1 points 50 points (+51|-1) ago 

I sure hope so. I'll be taking my own Linux virginity this weekend.

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[–] on_the_nightshift 0 points 24 points (+24|-0) ago 

If you haven't already decided on a flavor, check out Mint (Cinnamon). It works great on a USB HDD that I can plug into my work laptop and boot to, without messing up my work (read: locked down) Windows machine.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Womb_Raider 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Can you effectively avoid a network filter using this? Are they OS-specific?

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[–] ForteFleur 2 points 0 points (+2|-2) ago 

This isn't bad advice, but Mint is a little behind on security updates -- that's why I switched away from it.

In addition, most distros can work on USBs, not just Mint, and I don't think it'll work any "better" than any other distro on a USB stick, either. I used Kali on a USB stick for a while on my work computer as well.

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[–] harebrane 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

My advice is to start off with a flash drive persistent install (lili usb is a great program for creating them, very user friendly) to screw around with it a little bit at first, both to verify that your hardware will work well with linux, and to settle on a distro and desktop that you're comfortable with. After all, reformatting a flash drive repeatedly is faster and easier than repeatedly installing different distros only to find out one or more of them doesn't work worth a damn.

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[–] thouliha 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Check out elementary OS. If mint is windows+ubuntu, elementary OS is OSX+ubuntu.

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[–] AxisOfWevil 2 points 36 points (+38|-2) ago 

I'm sure there will be a wave of new Linux users but I don't think it will be sustained. You'll have some users who switch to Mac as well. In my opinion and from what I've seen, new users will get frustrated and go back. The culture windows fosters is "just buy a new PC". In the Linux world its "fix it yourself or with the community". My bet is on most people do not want to fix it themselves. Don't get me wrong, I'm a Linux user and I'd love for the world to adopt Linux as the primary OS. I'm a realist too and I doubt windows 10 is going to push the world to switch, permanently.

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[–] KinkRaven 0 points 22 points (+22|-0) ago 

Mint linux is what finally pushed me over.

Steambox solves my gaming issue down the road and support in linux is pretty decent now.

I'm just tired of windows crap in general. We don't actually know what any of it does unless the source is open and vetted by trusted actors.

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[–] AxisOfWevil 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Mint is nice. It's not my favorite distribution but it is very user friendly. Just don't try to deploy it over PXE lol. There are work around for a lot of the windows needs. Like pipelight is decent for viewing silverlight sights. I hate to admit this but Office 365, the online version, is pretty good on Linux. I mean it runs in a browser. There are different camps in the Linux world and I'm sure I'll get down voats for this next comment. From experience though, I've learned to ditch some of the built in stuff like icedtea and gone with the commercial stuff (free of course). Also, when all else fails and I really need a Windows box I just start up a VM.

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[–] kaosbane 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I reckon if people used hardware that is in Ubuntu's certified list of hardware, they shouldn't really have too many problems. It's usually hardware incompatibilities that screw things up for me on my Acer laptop, but I've been able to get it to work flawlessly just by googling the problem. It's been working without issue for over 2 years now.

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[–] lbruiser 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

https://system76.com/

There are also companies that sell Ubuntu laptops.

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[–] AxisOfWevil 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

You are 100% right. Most of my Ubuntu problems are from hardware. I remember when UNR came out. Every time an update was installed I had to recompile my wireless drivers. I've recently adopted CentOS and it takes a little more configuration to get it where I need but I love it.

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[–] MarianOnEarth 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It may cause a migration over to mac if they follow the subscription model that I think they're going for. You buy a X years subrscription and then have to buy it again when you upgrade parts or time is up. It might not though because a lot of people are very sheepy when it comes to computers.

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[–] AxisOfWevil 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I can see that

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] AxisOfWevil 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I hate to admit this but I have yet to try Steam on Linux. Then again I'm not much of a gamer. I just keep a VM handy when I need to test powershell.

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[–] Huntard 2 points 32 points (+34|-2) ago 

Didn't happen when Microsoft restarted Longhorn in 2004. Didn't happen with Windows Vista and didn't happen with Windows 8 so I bet it isn't going to happen now.

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[–] on_the_nightshift 0 points 26 points (+26|-0) ago 

I agree with you, but to be fair many of the Linux distros available today are WAY more user friendly than they were even a couple of years ago.

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[–] Bastou 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago 

I think what really prevents a mass migration is not the lack of a user friendly desktop, but the simple fact that it doesn't come pre-installed on new computers. Many casual users don't even know what OS they run on (it's always Windows), and they wouldn't do anything to install a new one if it required them to push a button.

The day computer makers/sellers will offer computers with Linux already installed is the day we can hope casuals may start to consider it.

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[–] cbrunos 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Didn't happen with Windows Vista

It happened for me. Vista is what made me switch and I'm sure other people too.

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[–] anonagent 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

8 is what made me switch to OS X

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[–] pH_ 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Sure, but Windows still controls 91% of the PC market, so it really wasn't a meaningful migration. The vast, vast majority of people:

A) don't care and will stay with what they know (Windows)

B) might care but are as tech savvy as a rock

C) will simply stay on their older Windows versions

Average Joe isn't going to switch to a new OS, deal with compatibility issues and learn the new OS just because they don't like the newest Windows OS that they aren't being forced to adopt anyway.

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[–] escape 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

What was wrong with Windows 8? I thoroughly enjoyed the OS.

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[–] Whatisvlad 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Coming from previous versions of Windows, it was less configurable and a significant departure from the previous UI, making it more difficult to support for IT professionals and a learning curve for beginners - plus more enforced cloud integration, and the whole tiles thing that made it feel like a Fisher Price My First Operating System.

What did you like about it? I haven't heard much praise but I am interested.

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[–] super_d_rawk 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Ha. According to that logic nothing will ever happen. But things happen.

I don't think the masses will ever migrate to Linux. The masses don't understand the culture, they can't possibly take the time to get to know how Linux is put together and that it falls on you to fix your problems yourself.

I can see some gamers migrating to a free alternative OS thanks to Steam. The more games that support Linux, the greater the feasibility of having Linux being the main OS of a gaming PC. My next gaming rig will be running Linux Mint, for instance. Young gamers who move to Linux now may become the game programmers of tomorrow, especially if they have to tinker in order to get their favourite games to work.

I can also see some companies migrating to Linux too. Some people need only a browser in order to work, why not in a free OS?

The vast majority will use Windows until M$ owns their souls.

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[–] stesch 1 points 27 points (+28|-1) ago 

No.

– Linux user since April 1995.

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[–] Bayard 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Can you please tell me what I need to learn to use linux effectively? A few years ago I ran ubuntu on a craptop of mine (no bloatware) to help it run faster. It was the most enjoyable OS I have ever used, and was fast as all hell too. But whenever I ran into a problem I had no recourse but to copy and paste commands into the terminal. How can I avoid such debacles, what should I learn?

This may sound like a moronic question but it really is genuine. I figured you might be a good guy to ask.

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[–] devotedtoneurosis 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Once you use it daily and use a "can-do" attitude when problems arise you learn the simple fixes for most problems, or become comfortable enough with documentation and command-line help(s) that you can fix a lot of things on your own.

In other words, you'll still need to use commands in the terminal, but it'll become second nature and give you freedom on exactly how a problem is resolved, or occasionally have the satisfaction of homebrewing your own workaround!

It gets a lot better when you get skilled enough not to be a forum slave. Of course, helping others on there is always a great practice too!

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[–] diodepain 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Whenever you have problems, don't just look for a quick solution. Research what is wrong with your system and why it's messed up. Eventually you'll have a pretty decent understanding of linux. Then, if and only if you still want to learn more, you should install a distro like Arch and apply the same methods. You'll learn a ton of things you don't even need to know to use linux properly that way.

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[–] stesch 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I haven't answered right away because I wanted others to give you a real answer first.

The problem with the question is that I'm not in education and my way to Linux was very different from any way you need to walk today. I started with a Commodore C64 in 1984. Later it was an Amiga 500 (after that Amiga 3000). I used the CLI and tried shells that were ported/inspired by their Unix counterparts. The transition from Amiga to Linux was smooth.

Today I only use Linux on the server side. My current desktop of choice is a Mac. At work I'm forced to use Windows.

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[–] sodaphish 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Greetings fellow oldfag! May of '95 here. Did you ever run Trans America Linux? HOLY SHIT. My first Linux distro was Slackware.

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[–] stesch 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

My first was Slackware based: SuSE Linux April 1995.

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[–] i_hate_ducks 1 points 21 points (+22|-1) ago 

I'm definitely thinking about migrating to Linux.

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[–] AConsolePeasant 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Sweet. Just make sure to test it out on a LiveUSB or a VM first. I'd reccomend Ubuntu or mint.

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[–] diodepain 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

If you haven't settled on a distro, I recommend Antergos. It's lesser known but extremely powerful as it uses Arch under the hood, but unlike Arch it's extremely easy to install for linux newbies and looks beautiful right out of the box.

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[–] Caboose_Calloway 1 points 20 points (+21|-1) ago 

Anybody remotely tech savvy is likely to at least try at some point.

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