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[–] kronal 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

As someone who used it for years as my main OS is not veteran friendly either lol The UX basically sucks, although the customization is great, most of the time you just want to get your things done, not fiddle with your OS. Customization also requires you to know how to configure your stuff properly and lack of that could be a security problem.

Now I tend to enjoy Windows 8.1 because it makes me more productive, and gives me the best of both worlds, that is some applications that aren't available on Linux and ported open source ones.

As a side note, access to free applications is nice (and you get that on Windows and MacOS X, too), but some alternative to established products are simply not as good, and in general tend to have worse user interaction. You end up "paying" for them with the extra time you spend, it's not a panacea.

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[–] batteriesnotincluded 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

As someone who used it for years as my main OS is not veteran friendly either

If you find modern linux hard, I'm not sure if you qualify as a veteran.

It was bad in the mid 90s. Now its quite easy, and there are heaps of documentation, tutorials, videos, clubs, free helpdesks, etc.

alternative to established products are simply not as good, and in general tend to have worse user interaction

The argument about 'established products' is legit, but the OS it favours depends on the product. If you want to run the Cadence suite, you're going to need to run AIX, Solaris, or Linux. If you want to run the adobe suite, you'll need Windows. If you're stuck on final cut pro, you'll need OSX.

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[–] kronal 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

If you find modern linux hard, I'm not sure if you qualify as a veteran.

Normal stuff is not hard, it is just backwards really, most open software lacks horribly on the user experience department. When I install an OS I want to use it to get things done, not spend a reasonable amount of time having to fiddle with it, it becomes a liability. Even finding drivers can be a pain sometimes. You may not pay money for it, but pay with your time, assuming you do know how to configure it as you want and in a secure way, which most people probably don't.

My problem with it is not with being "hard", is as I said the user experience. With that I don't mean text terminals vs GUIs, I mean I don't want an OS I can customize to no end. I want an operating systems that gets out of the way, that is just a means to let me do my work, and that's it. I don't want even to have to realize if using my OS is easy or hard I just want to get my stuff done. Windows is not perfect but it's much more usable, specially on the later versions, and OS X also seems much better in comparison to most Linux distros.

Said that, the veteran part was a joke, while I have a decent amount of experience with it, it's not my intention to actually claim to be or even desire to become a professional sysadmin or whatever it is called.