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[–] Marquistador 0 points 63 points (+63|-0) ago 

I've always wanted to become familiar with and use Linux...I'm gonna make it a goal to try it out within the next few months.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 35 points (+35|-0) ago 

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[–] midasz 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

If you guys like I can make a quick youtube video on how to get a relatively easy distribution working, through dualboot or virtual machine. It's worth spending a couple of hours on. I'm on Arch but only because I like tinkering with my install a lot. If you install something like Ubuntu or Mint/Elementary you'll have minimum upkeep. Less than Windows anyways. Most stuff works out of the box.

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[–] GenghisSean 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

There are some really good casual distros too (and they make installing it pretty easy). Ubuntu and Mint are probably the most popular, but I think Zorin is cool.

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[–] raydeen 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Unless you're running something super duper new or something super duper old, any decent consumer focused Linux distro should pick up all your hardware on the first shot. Maybe there will be some little hold out with a printer or webcam, but that should be easily searchable for a solution. I recommend any of the Debian based distros simply because of the sheer amount of software available and its ease of installation. This would include Ubuntu and Mint. Also, go for an LTS release as it will be supported for three to five years as opposed to eighteen months (*buntu versions). Mess around with a copy in VirtualBox first to get a general feel, and then do some research or try a live CD/DVD to see how well your system handles it. This won't touch your main OS unless you decide to install.

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[–] ReanLu 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I switched a few years ago and the only skill I needed to "learn" was how to google properly. Really, there are dozens of forums out there and every single issue I've run into, someone else has inevitably had and there are usually 2-3 ways to solve it, depending on your comfort level.

I suggest Linux Mint to get started, and I would also dual boot to keep an older version of windows available to you, just in case you should need to flip back and forth for specific applications.

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[–] Beers 0 points 26 points (+26|-0) ago 

Linux can be really beautiful. Don't wait. Also, install Guake, its cool lookin.

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[–] Marquistador 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

2 more weeks and I'll be DONE with grad school. Then awwww yeeeeeah, I'm diving in!

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

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[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

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[–] Monkeyman 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I've been thinking of jumping ship to Linux mint for some time now, this might be the final straw. How difficult is the transition from Windows for the average user?

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[–] JesTheRed 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

Do it in a VM. Oracle is free.

Once you've got the hang of it, boot your VM off a Clonezilla ISO, write the OS to a file on an external disk, then restore it to your PC with a Clonezilla CD/USB boot.

For bonus points, reverse the procedure and put your old Windows install in a VM on your Linux rig for those rare Win apps.

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[–] Marquistador 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Nice! This is the stuff I need to know. I gotta start looking in to all of that. Hah. Definitely want to make sure to set up a fail-safe.

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[–] MysteryMeat 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This is genius!

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[–] Pinyaka 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I wouldn't transfer a system from a VM to an actual computer. There are lots of kernel differences between running as a guest and running as a host. Just do a fresh install of whatever distro you've chosen.

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[–] AssaultMonkey 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Pst. /v/Linux. Come on over.

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[–] Marquistador 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Done and done.