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[–] TimeLoopedPowerGamer 1 points 44 points (+45|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Try the Linux Mint distro*. As easy to use as Ubuntu, it avoids a lot of the annoyware and bad usability decisions that Ubuntu currently has. One warning: they don't allow full-version upgrades. When 18 comes out, if you're using 17 you need to do a clean (re)install of the entire OS. Of course, if you're installing Linux correctly, that is really, really easy to do. Just put your user partition in the right place to begin with and there's no data loss, and few if any config things that need to be redone.

That sounds scary, but Ubuntu borking up on in-place, full version upgrades has been a major issue, so it is likely a good idea to not even support doing that.

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[–] Ronjoe 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Mint also has a Debian edition that doesn't need reinstalling and will continue to receive support as long as Debian does (so, forever).

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[–] ReanLu 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This is the right answer.

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[–] snakepaws 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This is the solid choice, but would you recommend it for a new user, really? I think Ubuntu-based, even though Ubuntu itself is Debian-based, is a little easier for the average person when it comes to troubleshooting and getting things working out of the box. More stuff by default, which is good and bad, ease of use, etc. To be fair, I haven't messed with Mint's Debian Edition, so a lot of that friendliness found in the Ubuntu family may very well be present.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] the_spectre 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I'm confused by your comment.

What doesn't recognize which partition?

Also, what did you use to make the USB drive? If it wasn't Rufus, you should use Rufus.

Most likely you either:

A) don't have your USB correctly set up for UEFI

B) have a weird partition table

C) used the wrong partition type (for Linux, use an ext system. Preferably ext4. Also, save about 4 GB after that for swap.)

D) your USB is UEFI but you're using legacy boot. On that note, do you use Win 8? Do you have an SSD? Do you know whether you've got UEFI set as default? Is secure boot enabled? (You'll have to disable it.)

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[–] LordCobalt 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

If you're using a UEFI machine intended for Windows 8 then you may want to ensure you fully disable secure boot. That leads to no end of headaches in my experience.

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[–] jakeinator21 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I personally just used different drives for each OS, then when I boot I select the boot source of whichever OS I want to use.

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[–] TimeLoopedPowerGamer 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Some of that seems off about the USB bootable device partition. Others replying have good answers on those issues.


As for dual booting, for ease of setup just make sure your bios is updated first. Install Windows on a clean disk with a large unused area left after partitioning for Windows (usually means advanced setup to get this done--otherwise just use a Linux utility disk to partition as a step "zero"), then just install a modern Linux distro over it.

Make sure to get your partitions straight. Google a guide for your distro to get the types right, but usually you at least want a "/home" that isn't your "/" partition. Then you can reinstall new versions over that "/" without wiping out data or (most) settings.

The default Linux dual-boot installer settings will usually install a boot menu you can use that'll "Just Work." I haven't had to screw with that for years now. Hope that helps.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] TimeLoopedPowerGamer 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Another good option.

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[–] DownloadedYourCar 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

That might be true, but 17.2 is an LTS (long term support) release & currently has 4 years of updates/support left, after those four years you can then get the next LTS & enjoy another 5 years of updates. You really shouldn't run a system for more than a few years before doing a clean install anyways.

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[–] TimeLoopedPowerGamer 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I get what you're saying, but that's not how desktops work. LTS means nothing to desktop users. In six months, there will be something 18.x does for 3D video and sound driver support (or lots of CLI bullshit to setup). People want it because Skyrim will run 30% better, and they hate CLI bullshit (as they should) so they'll upgrade then, not in a few years. Or something like that.