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[–] boredTech 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Fun fact, f1 program is flooding the colleges. https://www.happyschools.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/sevis-students-by-state.png

and these international students are taking over seats in the stem fields https://redbus2us.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/OPT-Students-F1-Students-H1B-Visa-2018-Stats.png

and then transfer to the same city that they graduated in

https://www.brookings.edu/interactives/the-geography-of-foreign-students-in-u-s-higher-education-origins-and-destinations/

Forty-five (45) percent of foreign student graduates extend their visas to work in the same metropolitan area as their college or university


So, what's my point? With higher rejection rates (because filling seats with foreigners causes locals to have to compete harder) universities get to amplify their status, and increase their tuition fees. With local seats filled it creates a local skill shortage and a higher demand on h1-bs. The foreigners while here can locate a local job sponsor who will take them on after they graduate, lowering the pay of the employers for that company. And, the cycle just keeps cycling (also, raising the college debt of the locals while making it harder to pay).

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[–] Pwning4Ever 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Regarding stem, yes it's true. We need to gets this stupid idea of going to college for "arts" out. In my computer science classes, the f1 to citizen ratio was far higher than the general admission

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[–] boredTech 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

We need to gets this stupid idea of going to college for "arts" out.

I have no problem with the arts. Do I think that they're nearly as useful to society, hell no, but if it wasn't being used as a communist propaganda platform then I'd have zero problem with people going to college for the arts.

the f1 to citizen ratio was far higher than the general admission

kind of the bi-product of high schools having excessively weakened their mathematics and science programs.

But, to get people into the stem fields you need to raise a desire to work in them from an early age (6-12 years old) and then properly mentor them till college. It's a lot harder to find somebody who is willing to sit indoors at minimum 8 hours a day, doing something that you can't really explain to others (My wife doesn't understand half of the words out of my mouth when I try to explain to her what I do. In the end I have to go low level and just say I make the silicon brick like me.) then it is to get somebody willing to go out and use all of their soft skills and get paid for it.