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[–] gazillions 3 points 29 points (+32|-3) ago 

How long will it take for someone to dig into that and find out it's another giant subsidy scam of some type?

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[–] LewsTherinTelamon 3 points 13 points (+16|-3) ago 

Well, they manufacture in the us with massive subsidies on their gigafactories. Then they turn around and sell the tech they manufactured overseas. Seems like the same old scam.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Ghetto_Shitlord 2 points 4 points (+6|-2) ago 

Well a certain section villifies anything that is not "traditional dirty power" so what do you expect?

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[–] killercanuck 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Or a giant room full of hamsters.

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[–] carnold03 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I didn't even think Australia had Hamsters. I'd always figured if something like that was cooked up down there, it would either be abo's on exercise bikes, or 'roided out Kangaroos in hamster wheels.

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[–] Crashmarik 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

SW Australia's grid was mamothly f'ed over

http://reason.com/blog/2017/09/18/in-australia-as-renewable-surge-the-pric

Doing just about anything was bound to help. So you have the usual cycle of demanding "clean" power then needing to fix it

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[–] AnthraxAlex 0 points 12 points (+12|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Adding reserve storage to the grid is a good idea. That said I'm not so sure about batteries at this scale. It would probably be more efficient to pump water uphill into a reservoir to store power and tap power by letting water out through hydro electric generators. There are a few other ways it could be accomplished as well such as giant flywheels. Think a fly wheel as large as a house and weighing in at several hundred tons.

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[–] Thisismyvoatusername 1 points 9 points (+10|-1) ago 

Pumped-storage hydroelectricity is far too mainstream to get people excited, though. It is hard to get huge new subsidies from the government and accolades from the environmentalists for approaches that are already in wide use.

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[–] Gorillion 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Greenies have been very careful to demonize hydroelectrics around the world. Muh environmental and natural beauty impact and all that. Though it's the best option for raising the 3rd world up from their fuckass status.

These days I just assume that Greenies are actually serving the globalists and hydro has been specifically suppressed, because it's too effective and would keep niggers in their own countries.

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[–] webrustler 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

The main advantage of the Hornsdale Power Reserve (Tesla battery), is its ability to provide power in milliseconds, before other backup power comes on.

First, the power plant responded to the grid frequency challenge before the offending coal plant actually finished tripping itself from the power grid. That’s not like telling the future, but it’s so fast you’d start questioning things.

And secondly, it finished its work of stabilizing the grid and shut back down before the regular backup plant even started its work. Because of the slower nature of fossil fuels generator, literally spinning up a massive turbine, they’re designed to deliver far more energy than is needed to the power grid. As a form of insurance.

That said, hydroelectric storage is a great conventional means to store large amounts of energy, especially in off-peak times. Recently a wind power station of this type was built near here that combines hydroelectric storage with the notoriously unreliable wind power. It's supposed to be able to switch from storage to 16 MW generation within 30 seconds and have a storage coefficient of efficiency of 80%.

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[–] P8rtsUnkn0wn 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Those ideas still wouldn't be as quick as an actual battery bank. Also, alot more moving parts means alot more system maintenance.

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[–] AnthraxAlex 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Lithium batteries only have a life time of a few hundred cycles so your looking at replacing the entire stack completely in something like 2 or 3 years.

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[–] Alwaysmakingprogress 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

There’s one somewhere that’s basically flatbed train cars full of concrete blocks, excess power pulls them up a hill, and then they generate power coming down.

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[–] Germ22 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

sounds interesting, do you have a link for that?

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[–] roznak 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

How long will those batteries last?

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[–] ruck_feddit 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

I'm no fan of the guy, but those batteries will last thousands of cycles over the course of a decade or more.

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[–] Fuckyounigger 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

How long is a cycle

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[–] Camulos 5 points 3 points (+8|-5) ago 

Not long enough I suspect.

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[–] DeliciousOnions 3 points -3 points (+0|-3) ago 

That was my next thought as well. Maybe two or three years?

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[–] ruck_feddit 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

They're probably 18650's, but I don't know for sure. Typically thousands of cycles with the management features running on site. After a while the total capacity is reduced, but they still work fine.

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[–] RevDrStrangelove 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

LOLWUT. I'm a power lineman. Powerlines are what I do for a living and none of this adds up.

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[–] Gorillion 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Ever worked in Wichita?

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[–] RevDrStrangelove 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I used to work with a guy that had that song as his ringtone.

He was a douche.

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[–] Alwaysmakingprogress 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

Read about California’s rolling blackouts a few years ago, and imagine if they had giant battery packs to turn on when a megawatt was five figures. Seems plausible to me.

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[–] Bad_Idea_Bob 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

rolling blackouts were a manufactured crisis to purposely cause instability, uncertainty, and allow companies to price-gouge their customers.

Enron

they could have done the exact same for the power delivered from these storage centers. Unless every house had backup batteries, the crisis would have developed in the same way. Hell, they still could have fuxked with the power delivery to prevent any home from charging up its batteries

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[–] ruck_feddit 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

They could all watch tv for one hour... super.

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[–] elitch2 1 points 6 points (+7|-1) ago 

I call bullshit. If you pay attention to the wording of the article, you will see that they are being disengenuous.

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[–] jonlom 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

Correct. Tesla will maximize their initial funding based on their incredible efficiency and savings. Then when the contracts are signed the unforeseen additional expenditure will cost taxpayers hundreds of million of dollars.

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[–] Gorillion 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yep, the service contract is where the real profit is.

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[–] I_Ask_Questions 2 points 4 points (+6|-2) ago 

It is.

These cunts are subsidised as fuck by our government. Our electricity bills are so fucking expensive thanks to these retards and their "renewable energy goals"

they refuse to consider that renewables cannot sustain our needs nor are able to produce the output required for the country.

we actually need to move power between states because of this. large areas experience frequent black outs because they are trying to run on.

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[–] Ghetto_Shitlord 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Source? My home is exclusively wind powered. The only failures have been caused by the legacy power company being a shit corporation and not maintaining lines.

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[–] elitch2 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

Oh yeah, I know. I lived in Adelaide for ten years.

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[–] BumbleTummy 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Do you know why gas prices are climbing? Because they weren't making enough money, production was booming, refineries were cranking out refined oil and (as a byproduct) gas like crazy, and so they decided together to decrease production, in order to push the price of oil back up. This is like TV manufacturers deciding that TV's are getting too cheap, so to make more money, they decrease the available inventory of TVs available in stores...

The Power Companies are going to do the same. They are not going to voluntarily go out of business.

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[–] 12740438 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

They are not going to voluntarily go out of business.

They are not going to voluntarily compete. There is also no competition for the physical grid. Here they drive around all new trucks every year, and never want for a single thing that their captive customers can't buy for them.

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[–] Inconceivable2 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Tesla is succeeding at Capitalism. A lot of comments here say how terrible that is. Is there a full blown commie infiltration on voat or something? Or are they just trying to say Capitalism is really, really, really great... unless it helps Elon Musk.

Not sure what people are thinking... or maybe emotions are getting in the way of thinking?

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[–] Cat-hax 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

"zero emissions" I guess it never needs to be charged then.

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[–] Kannibal [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

powered by a lot of hot air.

Australian desert, after all . . .

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