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[–] GuyIDisagreeWith 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

We need to start a rumor that licking concrete will work like eating mushrooms. It'll be the new Tide Pod.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Slayfire122 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Have you tried soaking all the walls and shit with strong bleach water?

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[–] BlueDrache 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I always try to be the cheerful dude when making concrete as well.

My issue is ... Why did they use a picture of iron-spalled concrete?

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[–] Stayedclassy 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Because hairline cracks are less interesting.

What I cannot understand is typically we go to great lengths to limit the amount of organics in concrete. Now they are saying they want to add it back in?

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[–] Dfens 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

He said concrete can fill it's own crack with a fun guy. Huh huh

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[–] Inconceivable2 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Interesting. I wonder how much this will increase the cost (nothing about that in the article). Also not mentioned is how long the fungi can survive while encased in concrete.

Other researchers have actually produced a commercial product which uses a particular strain of bacteria which, in similar fashion, reacts to the presence of water and forms limestone to seal cracks. A spray-on version is already available commercially with 2 other variants, a repair mortar for structural repair of large damage and an admixture for new construction concrete, still undergoing tests. They have already been used in Ecuador and elsewhere in the world so this seems much closer to reality than the fungi. The bacteria can lie dormant for 200 years until activated by water (i.e., a crack in the concrete opens and exposes the bacterium to humidity or rain).

“We did a project in Ecuador where we made a concrete canal and irrigation system with self-healing concrete,” Jonkers said. “We are doing tests all over the world in developing countries where they realise that though this is more expensive than current tech, they see the profit because they will have to avoid repair down the line.”

Initial costs are higher, 100 Euro per cubic meter versus 70 Euro for "standard" concrete. But the benefit of having a longer lasting structure and reduced maintenance costs more than makes up for the increased initial costs. The cost will, of course, go down with widespread adoption (economies of scale) and improved techniques or processes.

Self-healing concrete already commercially available

Whichever technology wins in the end is less important than the outcome: finally ending potholes, ensuring bridges, canals and tunnels last as long as possible with reduced maintenance costs and improved public safety.

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[–] NeoGoat 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I fungal spores are amazing; I presume they would last decades under reasonable conditions, like no extreme heat or UV radiation. I spent a few minutes doing a web search and was amazed to find nothing until I typed "fungal spore longevity"; "fungal spore survival" had proved fruitless. Anyway, it can range from days to over 30 yrs, according to https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=cDfLBAAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA447&dq=fungal+spore+longevity&ots=oqV1z22k0Y&sig=VnedzGxWjG8Hg507Eqab6jj9h_w#v=onepage&q=fungal%20spore%20longevity&f=false

I would also think the fungus could repair small, slow cracks, but would be useless against large ones. I'd say if it (or the bacteria you mention) can fill the small cracks at sufficient speed, they won't grow. Larger stresses would cause larger problems.

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[–] Inconceivable2 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

30 years. Hmmm. The bacteria can survive 200 years. I am glad they did this research, though. Without constant improvement we will stagnate as a species. Only by researching different ideas and approaches can we avoid stagnation and decline (see Roman Empire) so I'm all for it, even if it leads nowhere. "If we fail to try, we guarantee failure."

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[–] crustyjuggler 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Lol. This reminds me of the concrete in Wolfenstein: the new order

http://wolfenstein.wikia.com/wiki/Über_Concrete

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[–] strange_69 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Who needs nano-machines when you have fungus.

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[–] Inconceivable2 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Technically, fungi are just that... only biological instead of technological

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[–] BoraxTheFungarian 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

Sweet deal.... Now we just need to select the right mix of fungi and take this idea to the extreme for indoor environments to actually be beneficial to people instead of fucking digusting disease vectoring shitholes.

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[–] lord_nougat 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

9 out of 10 Fungarians approve!

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