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[–] ShowMeThePunny 1 points 54 points (+55|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Pump the breaks.

There is a big fucking difference between ISPs and Google or Facebook.

If i don't want Facebook to have my data, then I don't go to Facebook. Google is a little harder, since you also need to avoid Chrome, YouTube, Android devices, chrome cast, etc... But you still can avoid them. You essentially "opt in" when you use their services.

You can't say the same for ISPs. You cannot opt out of their tracking without opting out of the Internet entirely. The closest you can get is VPN so all your traffic is encrypted and sent to the same VPN server, but even then they know you are using the VPN.

I'm not saying that protections ever existed, just that your point of comparing them to other "big data" isn't a fair comparison. There should be protections in place to prevent ISP snooping.

Edit: Your story also doesn't make sense. Obama wasn't a legislator in 2016. If he had regulations within executive branch, Trump could undo it with a swipe of the pen like he just did with the EPA. If there was a law passed in December 2016 it was done with Republican congressmen and senators.

Edit2: Just did some research, and the answer is somewhere in the middle. Trump could do away with it, but the law is to stop POTUS Elizabeth Warren from doing this in the future.

I think the best solution is to do some trust busting. Break up the ISPs to inject competition in the market place. If people had options that would allow market forces to allow people to choose privacy vs price vs bandwidth vs datacaps etc.

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[–] MaraAcoma 2 points 4 points (+6|-2) ago  (edited ago)

The quotes are not my words, but of others. I agree that ISPs(and all other services on the internet) should not be allowed to sell your data. I spent a few hours going through the document and it was drafted in 2015 and put into place(but not enforced) on the date mentioned.

As for removing it I view it as redundant as ISPs are already required to do so under 47 U.S. Code § 222.

 

I think the best solution is to do some trust busting. Break up the ISPs to inject competition in the market place. If people had options that would allow market forces to allow people to choose privacy vs price vs bandwidth vs datacaps etc.

This is very much needed it most forms of industry in America.

 

Edit: Here is a report from the other side of the road, for the Isp's themselves. I browsed through it and both this and the 81 Fed. Reg. 87274 have compelling arguments for and against each other. It seems compromise is something we are lacking least we end up with Europe's nightmarish system.

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[–] Saufsoldat 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

The quotes are not my words, but of others

Doesn't matter. You said "It's a scam" thus openly saying you agree with the quotes. Don't spread misinformation and then pull a "it's not my argument" when called out.

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[–] effusive_ermine 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

If people had options that would allow market forces to allow people to choose privacy vs price vs bandwidth vs datacaps etc.

We used to have options like AOL, Mindspring and others, but no more

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[–] therealkrispy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

And what say you about the government? They don't give a tenth of a fuck what search engine, what web browser, what OS you use. It's all compromised. At least Google and Comcast don't have handcuffs.

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[–] ShowMeThePunny 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

The concern is that, for instance, Disney will pay Comcast millions to find out which Internet users are watching Disney movies on Russian websites.

Then Disney takes that list to their team of lawyers, and bring copyright infringement cases against millions of Internet users. That results in thousands of dollars in fines, and yes possibly handcuffs.

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[–] Jixijenga 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Google is a little harder, since you also need to avoid Chrome, YouTube, Android devices, chrome cast, etc... But you still can avoid them. You essentially "opt in" when you use their services.

Haha, it's even easier than that. Just don't load the .js and Google's oh-so-scary antics will cease to apply. There's extensions across multiple browsers that do this very thing and Google hasn't said boo about it since most people just choose to opt-in with apathy. They're not sneakily running around trying to trick you into it, if you don't want to be watched they don't give a fuck because most of our peers play ball.

That makes the case that "Google is the same as ISPs" even weaker.