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[–] theMETA 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

This kinda stinks, as I use 32-bit systems for VMs. As a 32-bit machine, it requires less VM RAM, less system-RAM, and less resources overall.

I tend to use my VMs to test things that I'm pretty sure will break my machine, so that I don't lose anything too important. Now, I don't have that lightweight resource.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] theMETA 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

It's not the 64-bit VM that's breaking my machine, it's everything else I do with it.

Let's say I make a program that treads dangerously close to certain system files. I'm going to write it, then compile/run it in a VM, so I don't bork up my main machine. When making small VMs for this purpose, I've found it best to use smaller, 32-bit machines as they require less resources.

A 64-bit machine will require more RAM on both the guest and host, as well as more processing power. I'm not going to sacrifice all of that to dry-run a simple sketch... I'll just keep backups of my main SSD, and run things from there.

It's a shame they took away such a useful tool, especially with a volatile system like Arch. When an update screwed something up, it was nice to test out "fixes" in a virtualized environment.

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[–] lmkevin 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

As a disclaimer, 32-bit (AKA i386) machines should not be thought of as "old" or "outdated". i386 is an architecture that is cheaper and easier to build than 64-bit (AKA amd64). Some cases i386 out-preforms amd64 on smaller computers.

For you musically inclined folk, amd64 vs i386 is like comparing a 6 vs 12 string guitar. We all know the superior sound of a 12 string, but it'll always be more expensive to make than a 6 string.

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[–] Atarian 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Except 12 strings sound like shit.

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[–] Donbuster [S] 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Took them (and everyone else) long enough...

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[–] Wuttier 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I understand why the creators would choose to go in this direction, as time and money are precious, so might as well focus on the future. On the other hand, I thought it was very welcoming towards older machines, hence the warm welcome of this bare-bones linux. Am I wrong?

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[–] Donbuster [S] 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Arch has always been primarily focused on minimalism, its true, but minimalism in the sense of lack of bloat, NOT minimalism for minimal resource usage and therefore max compatibility. That paradigm is better addressed by OpenBSD, Damn Small Linux, linux from scratch, and, to a lesser extent, debian.

Few machines need 32 bit support. Therefore it's bloat affecting the majority of the arch userbase. Someone will doubtless make a fork that keeps the legacy support.

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[–] 3dk 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

The idea is that those who want 32-bit Arch Linux will make it their own seperate thing, so it doesn't take up resources from the main project.

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[–] tibstibs 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Guess it's time to put something else on my old laptops.

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[–] tribblepuncher 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

FWIW, I'm sure that the classical "tiny" distros will continue to be available with IA32. There are some out there that, though not particularly famous, have "makes old computers useful" as a very critical selling point. Puppy Linux is one, IIRC. I wouldn't be a bit surprised if someone forks Xubuntu for just this purpose, either, when Ubuntu decides to shut down 32-bit production.

Simple fact of the matter is, though, that this is going to probably come to most Linux distros in the not-too-distant future, so dealing with it now is probably a good idea.

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[–] vastrightwing 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Considering you can buy a 64-bit raspberry pi for $35. 64-bit computers are going to be the standard now. You can always use older distributions. I just hope it's a while before 128-bit cpus become available.

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[–] jhaluska 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I just hope it's a while before 128-bit cpus become available.

It's very unlikely you will see them. Moore's law looks like it running out of steam well before we have 65 bits of memory. Even the original AMD 64 only wired up 48 bits of the address lines. The few places that would benefit from 128 bits can be handled under the hood or through SIMD operators.

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[–] vastrightwing 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I wondered about Moore's law. No one ever thinks there's an end to the good times.

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[–] Donbuster [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago