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[–] level_101 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

Everyone should have known about this at least months ago. I notified the teams I work with about it 3 weeks ago and logged into our teams systems after the rollover to confirm we were working properly.

Amateur hour.

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[–] Northvvait 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Welcome to the modern state of software development, where your users are your testers and code reviews are more about where to put that semicolon than actually paying attention to what the code is doing.

I'm exaggerating, of course. There are no code reviews.

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[–] level_101 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Well put. I have had to support dev groups before.. They were highly resistant to tools like CI that would blame them for breaking the tree. That and refusing to create unit tests. Good stuff.

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[–] sctoor 5 points 6 points (+11|-5) ago 

I'm sure it's the Russians' fault, hacking everything!! /s

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[–] The_Cat 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Leap seconds are a symptom of a very interesting problem. Our timekeeping has become so incredibly good that the earth's rotation is a wobbly mess in comparison. So to keep the two in sync, we need to add leap seconds to account for the slowing of the planet and the irregular hiccups in the length of the day due to earthquakes.

The question is this: do we awkwardly keep patching our superior system of timekeeping forever to match the unreliable rotation of the planet, or will we decouple the two at some point?

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[–] skruf 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I think it's best kept together due to agricultural reasons, if we don't we can risk a point in future where crops are harvested too early or planted too soon and can cause food issues.

Now we are talking about seconds here but eventually in (far) future this can pose a problem.

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[–] Dumb_Comment_Bot 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I wouldn't say agricultural, more of a convenience thing. Most modern agriculture is not based on very specific dates to plant this or that. It depends on meterological data. If the year is going to warm up 10 days sooner for whatever reason, you bet your ass farmers are going to plant 10 days sooner. People just want to wake up at 7:30 when the sun is just peeking out and we even adjust daylight savings time so this holds true. Because gaddarnit if billy bob wakes up at 8:30 to the sunlight instead of 7:30 he gonna be mad. And also timezones. Because goddarnit if people in china would wake up at 3 and go to bed at 6 what the fuck does that mean they have to be exactly like the people in britian and wake up at 8.

Long rant short, please lets get rid of time-keeping its horrible.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] The_Cat 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Tidal friction of the Moon lengthens the day by about 0.0023 seconds per century. But earthquakes and internal processes influence it as well. For example, the 2011 Fukushima earthquake shortened the day by 1.8 microseconds.

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[–] 7442705? 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Good thing I'm not on call and don't have to deal with this.

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[–] ShinyVoater 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Somehow I think that "fix" consists entirely of rebooting the servers.

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[–] damnittohell 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Three times.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] ShinyVoater 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Every so often, the year isn't a perfect 31,536,000 seconds(excluding leap years). So, rather than ignore the error like normal people, the anal people responsible for keeping "official" time add "leap seconds" to keep "official" time in line with "real" time. This is an extreme corner case that most people wouldn't think of when designing systems that invoke time(assuming they even know about them); needless to say, some code is going to be thrown for a loop when that extra second hits(especially if they happen to look at the clock right then).

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[–] aria_taint 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

Russia.

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