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[–] ggolemg 0 points 57 points (+57|-0) ago 

But consumers are unlikely to receive any money from the fine, which will go instead to the U.S. Treasury, said the agency official.

There's the reason it's even happening.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 28 points (+29|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] HilariouslyViolent 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I'm not really versed in class actions, but is the right waiveable? I swear I've seen contracts that try to have you waive your ability to participate in class action suits.

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[–] AustNerevar 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Not possible. AT&T users sign away the right to participate in a class action suit when they sign their AT&T contract. you can only seek retribution through small claims or by arbitration.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Einmensch 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

What check? As others have pointed out this is a fine, not a class action lawsuit.

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[–] Apoplectic1 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

We need to file a suit to have any claim on money from them. This was just a fine, much like one you would have to pay for getting a speeding ticket.

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[–] Entitilitus 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Occupy Wall Street?

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[–] Quatroking 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

And they would be ignored :(

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[–] openmind 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

So consumers will ending up paying for the fine through higher fees. If fines go anywhere else than to the customers/injured then the system will be abused by whoever is getting the funds. At least if the fines could be used by customers legal fees for a class action.

How can anyone expect punitive fines going to the treasury NOT to be abused sometimes? Some fines will therefore be unjust, distort the market and make conditions worse for consumers when the intention was to improve the environment.

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[–] reshp1 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

If it goes to investigating more ISPs, I'm ok with that.

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[–] openmind 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

It should have gone to the customers since that $100 million will end up being charged to customers via higher prices. This punitive system just forces ATT to change their language and charge customers more. If the ISP market is to be improved then more competitors have to be encouraged to serve the market.

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[–] Cid 0 points 19 points (+19|-0) ago  (edited ago)

The whole thing with the internet and the FCC aside, the FCC does take certain things seriously. If you break their rules they will fine the fuck out of you, which is really the only reason I supported the decision to begin with. This was inevitable considering that for too long ISPs have pretty much done whatever the fuck they wanted.

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[–] anonomale 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

As much as I appreciate that $100 million is a lot of money, from an article I just Googled: "Second-quarter 2014 net income attributable to AT&T totaled $3.5 billion, or $0.68 per diluted share, compared to $3.8 billion, or $0.71, in the year-ago quarter"

Regulatory agencies that can fine corporations should have penalties as a percentage of revenue (not profits). I can only imagine the legal battles that need to go on behind the scenes in instances like this. For an entity like AT&T with billions at its disposal and is far better equipped to contest charges levied at it than any individual would ever be able to, the resulting penalty should be significant enough to actually discourage the illegal behavior in the first place.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] boazdm 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

It's easy to look at a company that makes $4 billion and say "$100 million is a drop in the bucket - not a real fine."

Keep in mind that the goal of the fine is to stop them from doing it again, not to put them out of business. It comes out to 2.5% here.


How much do you make a year? I'm going to assume $50k. 2.5% of that is $1250

What happens if you get pulled over and get a $200 ticket for texting? I'm guessing you'd be kinda pissed, and then maybe think twice next time you want to text while driving.


Hopefully AT&T will think twice before they throttle people.

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[–] openmind 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This is going to end in tears and make internet access more expensive not better and faster. Whichever agency receives the funds from the fine will eventually end up abusing the system. Consumers will pay these fines through higher prices while ATT just changes the language on their products.

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[–] makingreen 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago  (edited ago)

It's about time.

I dream of a system where an entities rights and responsibilities are proportional to their power or influence. Mega corporations such as ATT should be forced to operate with absolute transparency, and any wrongdoing should be punished to the furthest extent of the law. I also believe the C level employees and any enployee directly involved in the transgression should bare personal liability, but I doubt that will ever happen.

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[–] gigantor 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

I swear to god they throttle my internet, however when I do online speedtests, it is accurate. Not sure how I can prove it.

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[–] samuraichococat 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

fun fact, its been proven that the majority of online speed tests are QOS/traffic shaped through ISP's now so in other words when you run a speed test, your ISP has routing and traffic rules to give that traffic priority so you see better results then normal usage.

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[–] AntiSqueaker 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

Yep. Speed test shows I have 4-5x "faster" internet than even my fastest DL speed on any website. It's bullshit and in any other industry would be labeled as false advertising.

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[–] solidwhetstone 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Is there some kind of speed test that gets around this?

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[–] manapot 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Speedtest traffic can be prioritized; giving faux results.

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[–] Picalo 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Easy way to find out, go to AWS, get a free server (I don't remember their speed but its blazing all around) and download a file/upload a file (probably upload first...cause then you can dl it) and see what your speeds are. AWS is awesome all around and I bet will give you a true representation of your speeds.

Please remember that downloading from say majorgeeks.com could be slower than a speed test just based on the nature of their setup. They could have only allocated 1Gb of download for all their users, which means you might see less than 300Kb/s for a download. We use two different hosting companies for our sites and one regularly is slower than the other. It isn't because TWC is throttling us, its because our hosting providers are sometimes slower than we want due to website usage.

Not saying they aren't but this is more likely the case.

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[–] odinist 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

The site speedof.me will give you a much more accurate idea of your speeds.

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[–] SellTheSun 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

To put this in perspective, AT&T earns over $360 MILLION USD PER DAY in revenues.

This fine is really just a slap on the wrist.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AT&T

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[–] Quawonk 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Exactly. It's nothing. I think these things should be a percentage of revenue, like 20%. Something that'll really sting, no matter how rich the company.

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[–] cyberpunk 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I got a text from them once for getting to 90% of my unlimited data plan.

I must've really been streaming a hell of a lot of Spotify to stream an infinite amount of data!

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[–] Jinisnotmyname 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

This fine is nothing for a company that made $6.2 billion in net income.

I expect quality of service to decline unless there's new powerful legislation to protect the consumers.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Pawn 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I have UL internet it's the bee's knees.

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