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[–] derram 1 points 9 points (+10|-1) ago 

https://archive.is/6N3kC :

Companies Can’t Legally Void the Warranty for Jailbreaking or Rooting Your Phone | Motherboard

'For years, cell phone manufacturers fought to make jailbreaking a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. '

'After losing the DMCA fight, cell phone manufacturers tried a different tactic to dissuade users from jailbreaking their phones: They strongly implied or outright said that jailbreaking your device would void the manufacturer’s warranty. '

'It’s unclear how often manufacturers actually try to void a warranty on a jailbroken phone. '

'As far as I can tell, OnePlus is the only major cell phone manufacturer that explicitly notes that rooting your phone does not void the warranty. '

'Jailbreaking an iPhone or rooting an Android phone gives the user the ability to install custom operating systems that are not approved by device manufacturers or carriers. '

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[–] mark132012 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

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[–] BirdPoo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This can't remain this way, otherwise it would be to simple to remove the onboard spyware. I gaged so hard after learning that jailed IOS needs to activate the precise location service to set the systemtime.

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[–] bob3333 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Companies CAN legally void your warrantee for rooting your phone UNTIL forced by a court not to. There's a difference between the mere existence of a law and its enforcement. Businesses view consumer protection regulations the way criminals view gun laws.

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[–] thephantompoop 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

By all means, take them to small claims court. You might get enough money for a set of brand new phones. If they happen to show up they'd have spent more money and time than they would by just fixing the damn phone in the first place

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[–] bob3333 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Winning requires a sympathetic judge. I learned the hard way that the law doesn't matter when I was a teenager and my employer bounced a paycheck. I sued in small claims court and the owner came into court and simply told the judge, "I don't know who this guy is and I don't own this company." Even though I had documents from the Secretary of State's office certifying this person as the owner of the business, and the bounced check, the judge dismissed the case without even allowing me to speak.

That's how it works most of the time in the United States. If you're suing a business, you are committing the crime of offending the "job creator" class.

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