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[–] Baconmon 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Not totally related to this submission completely, but I was pretty disappointed with this new star trek series cucking them selves out to leftist progressive bullshit, but I wanted to tell any one that doesn't already know about that "Orville" show that started this month, it is an actual space show and is light-hearted and not pushing any retarded agenda and I thought the episodes so far were pretty great..

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[–] CowboyXero [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I think I might just binge that once it reaches Netflix. I usually like whatever Seth MacFarlane puts out there.

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[–] DukeofAnarchy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Major Grin's Orville Ep. 4 review: https://youtu.be/JUA128pGjZE

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[–] DinoRider 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This made me think about ancient stories and mythologies that were never at any point copyrighted. Many of these are used today in film, television, video games, books, etc. When audiences see a movie titled “King Arthur” in 2004, and then a very different movie called “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” in 2017, they understand that these are unrelated re‐tellings of the same basic story.

Look at the television and film adaptations of Batman. People see a new Batman production with new actors and a different style and immediately know that this is a new version of Batman, not part of the last one they saw.

New fictional stories can be shared the same way. The only thing an original creator should do is restrict who can call their production an official part of the original franchise.

Let’s say you made a few productions in a series called “Star Battles”. If anyone else saw these, got an idea for some short films to add to the series and wanted them to be an official part of it—canon—they would need your permission to call it that. Without your permission, they could still use the name “Star Battles” for their productions. They could also use the characters and setting however they like. The only thing they could not do is state in any way that their stories are a part of yours.

So long as the new films featuring Batman did not state that they were a part of the Dark Knight series, or any of the many comic book adaptations, we understood perfectly well that they were a new, separate version of Batman.

At first I thought kick‐backs for the original creators were unnecessary, but they make a lot of sense when you consider a major studio picking up a small, independent story and using their superior budget to bring it to a huge audience for the first time. If those stories were a part of earning millions of dollars, they owe that original creator part of whatever they earn. If the original creation is not important enough to warrant a kickback, they should be able to make a profitable film without it.

The thing I like about your idea is that it involves people getting away from extending copyrighted franchises and into making their own, which is what all of these talented fan film makers should be doing. It’s not that hard to come up with the premise for a sci‐fi series. It’s the stories and characters that make a series great and they don’t need the exact setting of some already famous series.

You also don’t need to be completely original to have your own new franchise that you own the rights to. If there are aspects of your favourite franchise that you like, borrow them. Include them in a different way. Star Wars wanted to have ships that zip around the galaxy like Star Trek, so Lucas included that but called it “hyper drive” instead of “warp drive”. The new series “Orville” is a great example of writers taking almost everything they liked—or wanted to parody—about Star Trek but changing things enough to make it an original fictional franchise.

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[–] dontforgetaboutevil 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Wow man this is really great work. I love the name and the framework you are laying out. The way it kind of forces collaboration between different pseudo-studios instead of just outright competition is going to make for some really awesome stories. This could really take off to because I think the characters that will eventually become commodities.

That might actually be a bad thing though because it would break the ability of the character to stay true to their establish nature. But bending a character over on itself will probably cause a major drop in it's commodity worth and so most content users/creators would probably avoid it.

I have to say though that I don't think it would be a good idea to make any deals with a major studio. It might sound religious or something but I think it would be best to sever that tie forever. Sciborg should be it's own universe and leave the foul polluted universes of hollywood behind.

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[–] CowboyXero [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yanno, I had thought about that. That did occur to me. I know CBS and Paramount would not be invited to the negotiating table at all ever for anything I ever write. Really, though I don't think this forces collaboration more than encourages it as an act of defiance that Hollywood would be powerless to stop. I would really hate to force anything especially while calling it open source because I see so much potential to create something great but if I were to say want one of your characters in on one of my works, I would want you to work with me on the script because you know the canon better than I do but at least with this, it leaves a door open so that if your character needed my character even for a collaboration for an episode or a movie, it would be inconsequential to my own canon because he or she would just be there to help drive your story along. If it does become something consequential then that's when you and I collaborate on it, credit going where it's due. That's the actual intent of it. If it would compromise storyline, then other alternatives could be explored.

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[–] dontforgetaboutevil 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Force might have been the wrong word. Nobody would be forced because they just don't have to use your characters at all. But if they wanted to then the two studios would need to collaborate so that the integrity of all properties can be maintained. I used that word though because a lot of times people are really independent and won't work together at all unless there is a mutual need requirement.

Having people collaborate for mutual need is a lot better than seeing them fight it out in courts with lawyers. That crap has ruined so many stories and whole fictional universes. Frankly it has been the greatest plague on creativity ever known with show after show and idea after idea just wiped off the map or locked up in some warehouse somewhere.