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[–] SoaringChickenNugget 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

Sergio Canavero said researchers led by Xiaoping Ren at Harbin Medical University, China, have carried out a head transplant on a monkey. They connected up the blood supply between the head and the new body, but did not attempt to connect the spinal cord. Canavero says the experiment, which repeats the work of Robert White in the US in 1970, demonstrates that if the head is cooled to -15 °C, a monkey can survive the procedure without suffering brain injury.

I didn't read all of the article, only skimmed through, but why didn't they try to connect the spinal cord?

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[–] HorseIsDead 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Because they want attention and no one is smart enough to read the article anymore so they'll just assume it's what they imagine; a complete body change with everything working.

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[–] 0x7a69 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It kind of implies they only have that working on mice.

"... as well as mice that are able to move their legs after having their spinal cords severed and then stuck back together."

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[–] MedicalMountainGoat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

In the mice they specifically call that out, 'their own'. Which is highly impressive. I dont know how the fuck they extrapolate that to mean a human will be able to undergo a similar procedure but into an entirely new body. Absolutely ludicrous.

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[–] tame 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

The dude who they're trying to head-swap wants a new life support system because his body's already dying. Even if he's a quadriplegic afterwards he's still in a better place than if he were dead.

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[–] tribblepuncher 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I'd like to know precisely what the impact is on the head if it is cooled to -15 °C. At that temperature, large quantities of ice should be forming (and eventually the whole thing would freeze solid), which is AFAIK generally disastrous for mammalian tissue. Although there are thoughts of chemicals that may protect against ice or nanite-level repairs, the latter is nowhere near ready for clinical application and I doubt the former is much better.

This just strikes me that even if the human patient survives the initial operation, they'd end up nearly brain dead with a head that's falling apart. If they were lucky (assuming that the real luck wouldn't be a merciful death on the operating table).

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[–] kltpzyxm 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Dafuq

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[–] SegFault 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Why isn't it called body transplant?

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[–] tame 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Because they haven't figured out yet that identity is tied to the brain, not the body.

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[–] Clitorally_retarded 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Someday soon, the 1% will live for centuries, locking in their gains as a permanent aristocracy.

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[–] Loumedia 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Wut..

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