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[–] ShitpostingRetard 1 points 71 points (+72|-1) ago 

I'm pretty sure this is how half of all zombie movies start.

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[–] 9-11 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

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[–] Doomking_Grimlock 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Ahhh, Good Ol' Red Skull. He knows what wealthy, egomaniacal despots want. <3

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[–] airbreather02 0 points 27 points (+27|-0) ago 

That sounds like a really great idea.

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[–] Kaizervonmaanen 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Yes, it does.... This is pretty cool

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[–] SkepticalMartian 2 points 18 points (+20|-2) ago 

Came in to see the Hollywood-inspired knee-jerk reactions. Was not disappointed.

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[–] PlasmaDistortion 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

We would like to nominate you to be the intern on this glorious and totally safe project!

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[–] SkepticalMartian 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Were I a biologist, I'd be all over this. Be among the first to study a 30,000 year old virus? That really sounds like a career-making once in a lifetime chance for someone in the discipline. Of course, this is /v/science. Most comments here have nothing to do with science. This place is in dire need of stricter moderation.

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[–] o_V_o 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

Came to make a comment about the clichéd Hollywood-inspired knee-jerk reactions. Was kinda disappointed.

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[–] brokenmonkey 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

This is like the science version of Jackass.

"Hay, I'm Johnny Science and this is re-animating a 30,000 year old giant virus from the frozen wastelands of Siberia!"

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[–] Jesuislegrandezombie 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

"Hold my beer!"

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[–] ChaoticNeutral 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

If the virus is that old the odds are that we have a decent chance at being immune. The genes of the descendants of the people that survived the plague show changes as a result.

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[–] 3226 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Maybe not. Organisms tend to lose immunity over time if it's not needed. Kind of like biological streamlining. You can even see it on a cellular level. You can apply antibiotics to a strain of bacteria and cause them to develop resistance, but if you then leave that same strain to multiply without the antibiotic being present, they eventually lose their resistance again. There's almost like a biological 'effort' to maintain resistance to things that gets dropped as soon as it's no longer needed.

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[–] ShinyVoater 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

With human immune systems based primarily on exposure, it's pretty much guaranteed we'll be vulnerable if it can target us. However, given that human viruses tend to have very tiny genomes, I'd suspect it'd have a hard time being pathogenic, with a lower virulence than on ones we're used to(universal genome shrinkage seems unlikely without an evolutionary advantage).

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[–] ChaoticNeutral 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That's a fair point. I was also thinking song the lines of it possibly being a weaker version of viruses we fight off all the time. Our immune system has evolved for the last 30k years, the virus hasn't.

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[–] Kaizervonmaanen 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

99.9999999999% of all viruses don't touch humans at all. There are viruses everywhere, only a tiny tiny tiny minority makes us sick, it is highly unlikely we would get sick and they would still keep it in a controlled environment.

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[–] NeedleStack 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

You guys are making too much out of this.

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[–] Doomking_Grimlock 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago  (edited ago)

JESUS FUCK MAN!

Just...just...FUCK!

Where did you get that mask? WHERE DID YOU GET IT? You need to burn that fucker. Right FREAKIN' NOW!

Ninja Edit: Sidebar, did anyone happen to count how many people died in that episode?

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] jimibulgin 1 points 3 points (+4|-1) ago 

What could go wrong? /s

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[–] Clayton 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Looks like this isn't the first time they done this.

In 2004, US scientists resurrected the notorious "Spanish flu" virus, which killed tens of millions of people, in order to understand how the pathogen was extraordinarily so virulent.

I find this very fascinating. What we have here is the opportunity, and my the looks of it the goal, to create vaccinations and cures for diseases that have been eradicated in the chance they could always come back.

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