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[–] plankO 3 points 20 points (+23|-3) ago 

All came from Europe or those of European descent

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[–] Spankydickerson [S] 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

You have spotted the pattern here.

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[–] plankO 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Ever read Hugh Aldersey-Williams Periodic Tales? It's an entertaining book

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[–] Thisismyvoatusername 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

What about the elements whose color is not on the key?

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[–] cosmic_climb 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

Synthetic. Or already so rare they've never been found outside of Earth I guess. Like actinium (Ac) which is found naturally on Earth in quantities of "5 nanograms of 228-Ac per one tonne of thorium."

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[–] UlyssesEMcGill 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Why is Radon that non-color?

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[–] Thisismyvoatusername 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

My first assumption was maybe they were not naturally occurring, but I found a couple similar graphics that showed which elements those are and they were not the same.

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[–] Blkbox 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Thank you. I had the same ?

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[–] obvious-throwaway- 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Their color is not on the key because you should never hire a woman to do a man's job.

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[–] MannKepetry 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

its probably only created through decay of heavier elements

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[–] punchingtrees 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

I know science is always just a “best guess so far” but being able to observe light that travelled for millions of years and then make a determination of what elements came out of an event with stars is pretty incredible.

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[–] TheBuddha 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

It's not too complicated, actually. It's not just 'light' but electromagnetic radiation that is emitted and you can tell the source by the spectrum it occupies. We've known the basics since we first threw copper filings into a fire.

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[–] HorseIsDead 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Its not that simple, you need to build incredible instruments to measure that shit.

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[–] GOMAD_OR_GFYAD 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

How did they determine the percentages coming from one source vs another?

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[–] CallASpadeASpade 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Probably by determining how much of each element is created in each event, then estimating the number of those events.

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[–] Lafall 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

yeah I think the guys at NASA and other nerd astronomers in Europe, Russia, Japan etc were able to point telescopes to space and watch types of collapsed exploding stars and Supernova, stars like SN1987A being one example give off a signature finger print, where you can measure the elements in the light curve and look at half-life of Cobalt decaying to Iron, isotopes of Nickle and other heavier elements. The discovery of radioactivity in the late 19th century showed that some nuclei spontaneously transform into nuclei with a different number of protons, thereby producing a different element. Later measurements are confirmed by other international teams of scientists checking different spectra by space gamma-ray, radio, X-ray telescopes taking measurement of the small fraction of radio active decay and what elements are present in the surrounding gaseous Nebulae around the exploded star. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope images, have taken Deep Space pics of supernova in the 15 years from 1994 to 2009 of one single star, showing the collision of the expanding supernova remnant with a ring of dust/debris gas around the star...watching the interaction of the exploded star and the cloud of debris also provides more information again. Supernova Remnants http://hubblesite.org/news/35-supernova-remnants Hubble News

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[–] rwbj 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Without explaining the science behind it (which gets into quantum mechanics and all other sorts of fun things) you can tell the elemental composition of hot bodies (along with their relative proportions) based on the light they emit. The term is astronomical spectroscopy. As a fun factoid, we 'discovered' helium on the sun before (1868) we discovered it on Earth (1895). Interestingly enough, at the time helium was discovered on the sun astronomers did not understand why the emission lines worked.

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[–] unclejimbo 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

So my chrome-vanadium wrench set is mostly thanks to exploding white dwarfs? Does that mean they count as dwarven?

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[–] belrial 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Dwarven wrench of overtorquing. I'm not a mechanic I'm a D&D nerd. haha

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[–] 13Buddha 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Informative, concise, easily understood in this format. Thank you for posting.

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[–] Thereunto 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

It's worthwhile to note that some elements transmute into eachother, such as cosmogenic C14 being produced by cosmic radiation bombardment of N14.

N14 (n,p) C14

Interestingly, parts of the uranium decay chain are shown in grey. They likely should have the same colouring as uranium.

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[–] fatbag 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

interesting

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[–] Ryan2460 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

very interesting, thanks

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