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[–] dwhipwhipplez 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

I think this is the general effect due to restriction on funding. When you restrict the resource competition increases. Competition not always a good thing as we can see it leads to cheating if the incentives are perverse or resources are scarce.

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[–] rwbj 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago  (edited ago)

There's also the issue of the powers that be want to naturally fund 'things that matter.' The problem is that we don't know what will matter. What's the square root of negative 1? Any grade schooler can tell you it doesn't exist and, thanks to years of mathematical research we now all take for granted, any science graduate can tell you... it's complex.

Bad puns aside, imaginary numbers first began to be formalized in the 1500s. And they seem, at a glance, to just be mathematical mental masturbation. But eventually we'd come to discover them to serve key functions in electrical engineering, quantum mechanics, rotational systems, and so much more. At the time of the day everybody might have been all about funding a way to make horses move a little faster... but spending time pondering the math behind the square root of -1?

This issue bastardizes competition for funding even more since it is basically impossible to really determine what is valuable and what is not.

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[–] dwhipwhipplez 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Ya thats certainly an issue. No days its, why go to the moon or mars? Whats the point? Playing with science can seem as useless as any art. You are doing it cause its fun and you are just trying to figure something out. Its just a game. Will this song make money? Will this theory, tool, discovery mean anything, make money? Ya I totally get that.