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[–] ShinyVoater 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

From the paper:

The test campaign consisted of a forward thrust element that included performing testing at ambient pressure to establish and confirm good tuning, as well as subsequent power scans at 40, 60, and 80 W, with three thrust runs performed at each power setting for a total of nine runs at vacuum.

They used less power than some common lightbulbs. Why didn't they put at least a kilowatt into it - something a decent computer power supply can provide with ease? As much as I want to believe, it reeks to high heaven of cherry picking.

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[–] Xeros 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That's a really smart point. The experimental apparatus doesn't seem to crazy to build so hopefully its debunked or confirmed soon.

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[–] littul_kitton 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Because the device is a resonator. Once a microwave photon is injected into it, it bounces around numerous times before being absorbed by the walls of the apparatus. I would not be surprised to learn that the average number of bounces (Q factor) is 100, which would give them a resonator power of 10,000 watts. If Q were 1000 and they put in 1000 watts, the resonator power would be a million watts. At some point the high voltages will start causing electric arcs inside the apparatus.

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[–] The_Cat 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

That's really not how any of that works.

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[–] prairie 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

You gotta operate in the noise to hallucinate it working. Your suggestion would make it fail spectacularly.