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[–] Ifaptocomments 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

He graduated with a Mechanical Engineering degree which is the most physics-oriented engineering degree. Let's not lie, there's plenty to attack and mock Bill over than his once-real qualifications.

A mechanical engineering degree probably only covers basic mechanics and maybe some E&M but not at any sort of a deep level that lends understanding to the actual physics. He probably learned some watered down equations and basics.

So a list of physics subjects he can't comment on: quantum mechanics, thermodynamics (beyond absolute basics), E&M, Relativity (General and Special), anything related to biophysics or condensed matter, and anything science that is not mechanical engineering.

It frankly would have been better if he had a degree in chemical engineering.

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[–] 8890195? 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago  (edited ago)

A mechanical engineering degree probably only covers basic mechanics and maybe some E&M but not at any sort of a deep level that lends understanding to the actual physics. He probably learned some watered down equations and basics.

No, it goes pretty strong into mechanics, that is a strong foundation for the discipline and incredibly important for most ME fields. Yes though, E&M is very basic for all engineers unless you're an electrical engineer.

not at any sort of a deep level that lends understanding to the actual physics.

I think this is absurd. Yes, it isn't on the same level of a physicist, but I can tell you that a mechanical engineer, who has to learn more physics than other engineers, will understand more of physics at a higher level than many biology graduates who barely take hard-line physics. As a mechanical engineer, I knew more about physics than my best friend who went into biology... and her classmates. That was pretty common.. but yes anecdote.

quantum mechanics,

Agreed. Which is completely irrelevant to a science show because no one is gong to teach a bunch of kids quantum mechanics.

thermodynamics

Untrue. You learn a great deal about thermodynamics as a ME. This is even more true for MEs who go into the aerospace, automobile industry, energy, or HVAC industry. I think you're underestimating how much mechanical engineers learn thermodynamics; we all learn a great deal about thermodynamics and heat transfer principles.

E&M,

True. Only electrical engineers go far in-depth into this. But that's true for pretty much every STEM person who isn't an electrical engineer or physicist.

Relativity

True; but this is something that largely only applies to theoretical science as the effects of relativity are insignificant for most human experiences. And those who work in the aerospace industry (such as with satellites), end up learning about relativity because it becomes important to their job.

anything related to biophysics or condensed matter

And this would be meaningless, so yes. But how many chemists learn a great deal about biophysics? I doubt chemical engineers learn a lot, if anything, about biophysics.

anything science that is not mechanical engineering.

Mechanical engineering isn't a science. Mechanical engineering is a discipline that utilizes physics, which mainly includes the fields as I described in another part of this thread, which I'll quote below.

within the physics realm of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics (which includes aerodynamics), kinematics, force and energy in every conceivable way, and materials science

spacebreaker.

It frankly would have been better if he had a degree in chemical engineering.

Really? Chemical engineering is even more focused on the chemistry aspects of science. If he took a degree in chemical engineering, his scientific understanding would be mainly towards chemistry... how would that be ''better''?

Edit: In terms of things learned, MEs learn mechanics/kinematics the most, for obvious reasons, thermodynamics the second most, for thermal stresses, engines, and power generation, and fluid mechanics the third most for similar reasons as the previous.