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[–] ArsCortica 1 points 25 points (+26|-1) ago 

This goes to show that even the most haughty noble is willing to associate with the common rabble if you excercize enough pressure on him.

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[–] TheHolyGrail 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I love these personifications of the elements. Aloof.

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[–] KingMortales 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Well, at least he wasn't salty afterwards. That's pretty metal.

[–] [deleted] 2 points 1 points (+3|-2) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] MyDrunkAccount 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago  (edited ago)

1. Check ego

So true. Voaters, quik psa, if you ever feel your ego slippin, remember how you voted for Trump and how he keeps winning. Remember how every time he wins there is literally autistic screeching and gnashing of teeth coming from the losers. Remember what it felt like to smile, and learn to get used to the feeling. Exercize that ego back to the size of a planet and use it as a tool to push progress forward again!

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[–] stretched_girl 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

But what is it good for? Granted, ti's cool and all, but what does it matter? Will stable helium compounds going to be useful for something?

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[–] The_Cat [S] 0 points 23 points (+23|-0) ago  (edited ago)

The use of this is not in the compound itself, it gives us a better view of how chemistry works and helps us finetune our models.

The thing is, the way atoms interact with each other is extremely complex. We have fairly good models and we're starting to get pretty good at predicting material behavior based on computer simulations. But if we want to push these further into the realm of the unknown, we need weird exotic cases like this to test our models. If it predicts the correct behavior, we know we're on the right track. If it doesn't, it can give us an indication about what's missing. I can go in more detail if you like.

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[–] Jixijenga 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Hey, you're cool.

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[–] johnholio 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Yes, please - more :-D

*edit -if time permits

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[–] stretched_girl 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

If you gave me more detail it would just glaze my eyeballs. This was enough information for now. I appreciate the insight you provided. I didn't take chemistry in HS and have just started a college chem course. I wish I'd had the HS background, now. I chemistry is very opaque to me unless I have it in front of me and see the reactions. I sure hope this gets easier.

Thanks, The_Cat!

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[–] TheHolyGrail 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Hopefully it wont be utilised in weaponry. Since I imagine, between the state of stability and instability, there is a great quantum shift.

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[–] Viropher 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

In addition to what The_Cat said, it also opens up entirely new classes of materials to test and produce. What if,because of this,we discover a method of making a stable,room temperature superconductor? New chemistry and new physics opens all sorts of doors to new technology.

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[–] stretched_girl 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Ah, okay. I'm not the science research sort. Thanks! And thanks to @The_Cat, too!

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[–] murraryrothbard 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

Imagine that, new discoveries and research cause us to have to rethink the consensus viewpoints.

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[–] RonaldMcShitlord 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I love seeing kids fresh from their college physics and chemistry classes having their irrefutable beliefs crushed by new scientific discovery. "But Dad, I went to college and so everything I learned must be 100% true right? I know better than everyone else right?"

This is almost as fun as the crybabies screaming at the universe because it turned out the EmDrive works and that Newtons third law is not actually a law.

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[–] rwbj 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

I think the great thing about science is that once anything of any academic worth and merit is put forth on the table it tends to rapidly become the consensus view.

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[–] murraryrothbard 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Except when science and politics mix academic worth flies out the window.

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[–] J_Darnley 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

They say it is stable but if you release the high pressure does the compound remain?

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[–] The_Cat [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Probably not, many phases are only stable at high pressure. But it's still highly interesting to map out full phase diagrams.

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[–] TheHolyGrail 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I like to think of Helium as an oddball. ahaha

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[–] 8014471? 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

This is a very misleading title.
Nobel gas means it does not undergo a chemical reaction. ie. it does not have a CHEMICAL bond with other species.
ALL materials have physical interactions, this includes Van der Waals forces.
Helium is still so inert there are still zero examples of it participating in a chemical bond.
This is still very interesting, but my point being, if you believe the title 'forget what you've learned' it would seem that had already happened.

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[–] The_Cat [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

You're not wrong, and the title is of course oversensationalized. But I don't think your comment is very relevant. There's no clear distinction between what constitutes a chemical bond or a physical interaction. Especially when you get to high pressure, our conceptions of what makes atoms stick together gets all kinds of muddled. I don't think it's very useful to dogmatically stick to our preconceptions of how atoms should bond or not when we call something "bonding" or not.

EDIT: Apparently I wasn't entirely correct here, see below.

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[–] 8015180? 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago  (edited ago)

You are correct that a chemical bond is a somewhat arbitrary definition, but the the low energy induced proximity interactions of VdWs are physically different than the sharing of electrons in a covalent or ionic bond. If covalent bonding exists it effects the symmetry of the atom centers and such the spin and paring of electrons, as well as higher energy transitional states. These can be experimentally interrogated using various spectroscopic techniques such as EPR, IR, and Raman. As for ionic bonding an extreme disparity of the valence bonding electron must exist ( >7 in relative electronic density) which denotes a fairly arbitrary distinction between ionic and covalent. It is unlikely this can be tested experimentally in this particular case and should be then investigated via computational means.

Edit: "And, curiously enough, the compound appears to form without any chemical bonds to hold it together" This is a statement from the researchers. This is very interesting and must be explained in terms of physical chemistry. In short, a helium compound was made, but a chemical bond with helium was not.

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[–] 8015168? 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Came here to say this. It's more like a crystal or salt.

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[–] can_of_wurms 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

10 million atmospheres

for some strange reason

Hurr durr

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[–] heroinwinsagain 2 points -2 points (+0|-2) ago 

the earth isnt spinning 1000 miles an hour. otherwise how would planes travel west?

vanishing point. water doesnt bend around a ball. water is always flat.

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[–] The_Cat [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

  1. Not sure if troll or idiot
  2. Not relevant