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[–] mofoburrell 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

The CDC person mentions "urine and sweat". There are other things besides urine and sweat that will react with chlorine, as well. I.e., even if there were absolutely no urine, you'd probably get red eyes anyway.

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[–] Aardvark 1 points 10 points (+11|-1) ago 

I like that multiple elements on this page in night mode are urine colored.

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[–] purr 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

It's the same way on the regular theme.

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[–] michaelma4 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

good thing we aren't swimming

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[–] chundernuts 1 points 8 points (+9|-1) ago 

That strong 'chlorine' smell you sometimes get in a pool is actually chloramines, produced by the chlorine reacting with urine, faecal matter, sweat etc. :)

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[–] Saint947 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

Chlorine oxidizes nearly anything. With a big enough surface area of water, you're going to get organic particles just by sheer volume of air. Exponentially moreso outside.

Stop trying to gross people out. This is like the "fecal plume when you flush the toilet" bullshit from Digg.

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[–] voiceofflawedlogic 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Thank goodness it's probably my urine.

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[–] Kukbahlam 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

While peeing in the pool is disgusting, it is not the most common cause of red eyes. Any major PH imbalance will cause red eyes. Most of the time this is caused by the Cyanuric acid in chlorine tabs. Tablets are highly acidic and if you own a swimming pool in the south, you know that keeping a 3.0 chlorine takes a lot of tabs. Then add in the fertilizer people drag in from the grass, the spilled beer in the hot-tubs, insects, leaves, etc.

Most public pools don't use tabs but still have a hard time keeping the PH in check because standard tests are inaccurate and require "math" to determine the amount of chems required to achieve balance... and if you add too much, the PH swings the other direction and you get the same symptoms.. Lets say you have a 100,000 gallon public pool and you have a PH of 8. To achieve a neutral level of 7.2 you would need to add 4.1 gallons of Muriatic Acid. You cant just pour it in, you have to disperse it as widely as possible or it will impact your total alkalinity too much/quickly. You can't do this during the day while people are swimming.. So you have to do it after closing.... and that poor kid that makes $8 an hour as a lifeguard is defiantly going to wait around an extra hour to get this all correct. Right? I could also drone on about Total Alkalinity but this is already a small book.

I have a feeling that the reporter took Dr. Michael J. Beach's comments out of context &/or only printed the most sensational portion.

TL;DR - Pool chemistry is complex and reporters only seem to care about headlines.

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[–] xianghua 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Gross. Great post!

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[–] cyberpunk 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Well, that's something I never wanted to know.

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[–] TeddyKGB 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

And people ask me why I don't use the pool at my apartment complex. It's one big skanky petri dish.

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[–] Tawm 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

A Petri dish is filled with a medium that promotes cell growth. If the complex maintains its pool properly, it pretty much has bleach in it that kills any nasty stuff on contact.

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