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[–] EngelbertHumperdinck 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I'm not an astrophysicist, so forgive me if my question sounds incredibly ignorant. But isn't the universe everything that exists, everywhere? How could it expand? Doesn't it already go on forever in every direction? If it can expand, doesn't that mean that there was empty space beyond it's boundaries? So isn't that empty space already part of the universe? Or does it just mean that the physical matter that we can measure is expanding to cover more of the never ending void that is the universe?

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[–] mirimar [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Deep questions. They mean space/time when the refer to the expansion using the big bang as time zero. We cannot know if it goes on forever in every direction as it is impossible to test areas further than the observable universe. Is everything the universe if it is not homogeneous? A lot depends on what it expands into; is it really empty or being pushed aside as our universe expands?

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[–] EngelbertHumperdinck 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I just always thought the word 'universe' meant everything, everywhere. So it never made sense to me that it could move into new territory. In order for me to accept that the universe expands into empty space or pushes something aside, I would have to revise my understanding of the meaning of the word 'universe'. If the expansion refers to only the 'known universe' or 'observable universe', then I guess it makes sense. But then, do we have another word which can refer to everything, everywhere?

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[–] mirimar [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Begs the question how they were able to get a sigma 5 probability in the first place. Science should not be changing this rapidly, it is only ten years or so since the Nobel prize for this.