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[–] upduck 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Generally I use Visual Studio when writing C++ or C# code on Windows, Notepad++ when writhing Python or scripting on Windows, XCode when writing C++ or Objective-C on a Mac, Eclipse when working with Java, MonoDevelop when writing C# on Linux and vim for everything else on Linux.

The main thing I miss on vim and general text editors is really good code completion and intellisense. When working with a large project, I like to have fast access to things like the members of an object, the parameters of a method and its overloads, the variables currently in scope and so on. vim can do this to an extent with some languages, but doesn't do it anywhere near as well as a full IDE. Also, not much beats Visual Studio's in-built debugging.

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[–] BlueSpeed 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

As much as people dislike Microsoft products, Visual Studio is one of the best if not the best IDE. The latest version even has some basic static code analysis.

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[–] hammer 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Long time VS-user here. I feel like the newer versions of VS are getting bloated. Menus and built-in options have exploded in size. Don't even get me started ON THE SHOUTING MENUS. VS2013 you have to sign-in to use your IDE? wtf?

It's easy to ignore, but lately I've been finding myself using alternatives.

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[–] anonagent 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Eh, I prefer Xcode, VS installs like 500 things that are almost impossible to uninstall, it installs SQL server as if I'd ever want that, and the UI is cumbersome.

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[–] dda 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Great dev stuff...c#, typescript, visual studio.

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[–] catsup 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Agreed. I hope MS implements the features found in Greenhills SW debugger.

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[–] voat4em 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

If you're a vim person, make sure to check out the community edition of IntelliJ with one of the vim plugins available. I really like all the tools provided with the IDE while still being able to edit in vim-land.

I'm sure something similar exists for Eclipse.

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[–] Tiksi 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

I use vim these days. I used to use sublime, before that I tried a few different ides but I'm not nearly as productive with them as I am with vim. With a nice vimrc and a few plugins (NERDTree, SuperTab, fugitive, airline, Syntastic, and a few more, plus all the ftdetect/syntax stuff) I can get most of the advantaged of an ide, (well all the ones I used anyways) and still have a powerful, fast, composible modal editor.

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[–] minionslave 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Can you share you vimrc. I hear about that config file, but I don't know how to set it up.

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[–] Tiksi 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Sure, but a lot of the settings in it are plugin specific: http://paste.click/s/OigyAW

Plus, a lot of what I mentioned is more due to the plugins themselves than my vimrc.

Here's a couple screencaps of what my vim setup looks like:

http://paste.click/mmVhQM

http://paste.click/AmGUee

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[–] tredontho 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You can find a bunch of them on Github.

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[–] ad1217 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I use emacs: it can be a text editor or an IDE. If I wanted, it could also be vim.

Vanilla Emacs is not terribly good, but extensibility is its strong suit, and there are tons of scripts that do basically everything.

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[–] CaptainRex 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Ah, yes, emacsOS - it is all things to all people! You can read mail, surf the web, play games, develop software, and more!

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[–] RandomNumberGod 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

It lacks a good text editor through.

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[–] ad1217 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

surf the web

eww

(That's the emacs web browser, in case anyone doesn't know)

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[–] skeeto 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I use Emacs for everything because I can bend it to whatever workflow I desire.

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[–] gopherfucker 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I use emacs because I just can't get used to Vi/Vim modes. Also I use several programming languages (PHP, Javascript, HTML, Ruby, Go, sometimes C and as of late I've been playing with Clojure) and usually you have to get an IDE for each one or use a subpar text editor which just "works" with everyone. Emacs it's equally powerful for almost any language.

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[–] a-a-ron 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Atom, all the way. It might not be as fast as something with a native UI, but I don't really care all that much. The plugins are the best I've witnessed, and the user community is poppin', not to mention that everything is written in languages I know.

If I'm editing quick config files, I use vim, because it's good at navigation and deleting lines quickly, plus it's really easy to run as root.

I'm a Linux user, and I do (casual) full-stack on the web. I also do a bit of Arduino work too.

Most of my work is done alone ( :( ) but I still like the Git Plus plugin. And I use linter too. But besides that, I don't use an IDE because I don't like the computer managing all of my shit. I want to do that. Although if I ever find an IDE that gives me a good experience, I'll go right ahead.

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[–] RyFy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

For real. The plugin ecosystem for Atom is amazing given how new the whole thing is. Throw a few plugins in place and its my go-to for web development and client-side scripting.

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[–] zyeri 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

vim, or more recently, neovim.

I do mostly Python development (as a student / hobby projects), but I'll be getting into C++ soon for school.

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[–] Craftkorb 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

If you want a no-bullshit, OSS and cross platform IDE for C++, check out QtCreator. (Yes, you can write projects without Qt in there perfectly fine)

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[–] shrugisor 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

PyCharm for Python projects. Atom for everything else.

I love the extra functionality of PyCharm, especially the debugger. But if I'm programming anything else then I'll use Atom because it's so much smaller and faster.

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[–] Silver_Tube 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I too use Pycharm, haven't tried Atom very much, sounds tempting though

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[–] pool_guy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I use IntelliJ with the vim plugin for my Java (Android) work. I can't provide much of an argument for IntelliJ because I've only been a developer for a few years. I have it installed on OSX (work machine), and Ubuntu MATE (personal machine). Android Studio was just getting to Beta when I started doing Android work, I'm so familiar with IntelliJ now I don't want to switch (different shortcuts, etc.).

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[–] anonagent 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I've always used an IDE (Xcode ftw), and aside from editing a few cron jobs/.conf files; I'll never use a command line editor

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