[–] totes_magotes 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Pinto beans (at least) require a high heat to actually cook. Beans and rice may offer goodly amounts of nutrition but it takes goodly amounts of water to prepare. It's a common mistake by people starting on the prepping path to stock beans and rice without taking into consideration how much water and how much they are willing to eat it.

Your solution is simple. So simple that you might not believe me at first:

You ready?

Canned food.

Yup, canned food essentially lasts forever as long as it's not swollen or rusted through. The color may go a little off and the nutritional value might drop a little but not enough to do you harm and it certainly won't go bad. The expiration date on canned food is to get you to buy more.

So go out, get your cheap cans of food of whatever you like. Canned butter, canned bacon (yes), canned chicken, canned whatever.

[–] DeliciousOnions [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I have plenty of water to go with them (well water with hand pump) but I agree that I definitely didn't expect how boring the food would get over time. Thanks for the tip!

[–] totes_magotes 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Yeah, don't stock what you won't use or eat. Might as well just throw that money away. Also, don't underestimate the power of comfort foods.

[–] PsiloTheWolf 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Ditch the spam and pork sausage. Go wild game and fish. And add any kinds of veggies to it. Brussels sprouts, squash, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, some sauteed mustard greens or kale, mushrooms... beans and rice is just a base, man. You can go anywhere with it.

[–] DeliciousOnions [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

wild game

I'm pretty terrible at it and so never thought of this, but in that extended family there are two guys that bowhunt.

Only problem with most of the veggies on your list is that they're not shelf stable - part of The Big Plan is to keep everyone fed through a 2 month power outage.

[–] PsiloTheWolf 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

As far as wild game, if you start hunting, get yourself a good pressure cooker and learn to can meat. A freezer full of venison wont do you much good in a prolonged power outage, but a cupboard full of canned game and fish sure will.

[–] survey_girl 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

https://www.samsclub.com/sams/augason-farms-freeze-dried-vegetable-variety-pack-4-lb-6-4-oz-pail/prod7160220.ip?xid=plp_product_1_1 (and other stores sell this too... Amazon, Walmart, or straight from Augason Farms)

there are good freeze dried options for most of the veggies listed above. And Augason Farms also offers #10 cans of a ton of fruits and veggies. I keep a couple buckets of these on hand to fortify my rice & beans & pasta.

if your diet is only going to consist of rice & beans and the occasional wild animal, I would highly suggest you get some vitamins to suppliment. If S does HTF there will be a lot of cases of scurvy and other illnesses if people aren't getting regular fruits and veggies.

[–] robot7247 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Got this off another forum and it is really good. It makes 4-6 servings and is 1-pot, everything goes in all at once so quite easy -

1.33 cup basmati or jasmine rice (well rinsed)

2.66 cups water

3-4 tbsp Sofrito seasoning by Goya (in international or Spanish food section of market)

1 can of red beans (well rinsed)

Optional: 4-6 hot links (I used Johnsonville), slice lengthwise then slice into pieces

1 tbsp olive oil

Instructions:

Add everything to large saucepan, stir thoroughly to mix, set burner to high, and as it begins to warm continue to stir so rice does not stick to pan. Once oil warms it won't. When it boils, reduce heat to lowest setting and cover. Set timer for ~16 minutes and for first few watch that it does not boil over. When timer goes off check rice to see if fully cooked, if not recover and check again until it is. Fluff w/ fork & serve.

Start to finish about 25 minutes.

[–] DeliciousOnions [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Sounds pretty good - I'll try this one next!

[–] robot7247 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I've made it 10+ times since I got the recipe, it came out great first time. Goes great with fresh green veggies.

The only mod I made was how I rinsed the rice. The recipe called for changing the water until it is clear. The first time I did that it was 8-10X! Now I just dump the rice in a strainer and hit it with the sink sprayer until it looks mostly clear running off. You have to rinse the rice though, The one time I didn't it was a big clump in the pan and did not separate, glued together.

Also, recipe scales up or down directly, 1 cup rice to 2 cups, 1/2 cup to 1 cup, adjust other ingredients accordingly.

Edit: Do report back when you make it.

[–] pushthis 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Spices are good for changing same dishes. Tortillas. Pancakes, egg and cheese sandwiches, soups, if you have a big dutch oven and a fire maybe some french fries.

Try and fail making stuff outdoors and adapt the recipe. Peanut butter and jelly pancakes(with real ingredients) or dry ramen noodles. An ice chest is a great thing to have. So is butter

[–] Memorexem 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You can get a hand crank grinder, soft boil the beans, let them cool and dry a bit, then grind em into a chunky paste. Add some sorta fat, butter, whatever, and your spices. Sprinkle some half cooked rice in, let it sit for ~30m to soak up as much of that extra moisture as it can, then dip both sides in a ground up rice flour dredge and lightly pan fry.

The key is really walking that fine line of how much moisture is working in it. You need enough that it's not just dry beans, it's also gotta bloom those dried spices, but too much and it'll fall apart when you cook it.

Beans and rice have 1001 uses, but you can only, mentally, handle it for so long. Disguising that is going to be a good idea.

[–] Jobbyweecha 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Tomato paste or salsa added to the beans and rice have been things I've seen suggested to make it more interesting.