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[–] OldTrux 6 points 13 points (+19|-6) ago 

Have you talked to people who have tried to use their healthcare in Canada? I have several friends there and have heard some horror stories about waiting for almost a full day to see a doctor on more than one occasion.

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[–] TFP191 2 points 15 points (+17|-2) ago 

I'm from Canada I've had two life saving procedures and paid 0$. Ask anything you want about our system. Have close personal friends/family working as doctors, nurses and EMTs if looking for specifics.

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[–] Vladimir_Putin 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

Ah so looks like nobody wants to ask, I will.

If you have to wait a day like this man thinks you do, I'm assuming it's because what you told them is happening is not important? Like, if you told them you've broken an arm it won't take a day right?

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[–] Gargilius 1 points 5 points (+6|-1) ago 

...only a whole day? so Canada's system doesn't suck nearly as much at their European counterparts.

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[–] SmashedFinger 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I think waiting a full day is at the very least acceptable when you don't have to literally be afraid of going bankrupt from having a doctor's visit to check on an issue.

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[–] OldTrux 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Not compared to what I have now. I can walk in and be seen by a doctor within minutes or can make an appointment to see my doctor some time this week. Not show up and spend a day sitting in a waiting room missing work.

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[–] Amateur_Wizard 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I can assure you that that person wasn't deemed sick.

We have the CTAS system here, it's a fluid triage system here.

Meaning, if you NEED a doctor, you will be seen.Its not first come first served. If you've been waiting 45 minutes because you've been deemed a 3, then a MI/ MVC comes in... you'll be waiting longer. Protip: ambulance trips will NOT increase the likelihood of you being seen first either.

If you aren't being seen at a hospital, it's because you've been graded according to your health status AND if you've waited more than an hour and live in a decently large city, you are a fucking twat.

There are urgent care clinics and walk in, and whatever else to take care of you.

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[–] OldTrux 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

It was Quebec....so not exactly a small city. Anecdote though it may be.

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[–] CowWithBeef 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

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[–] RAMASULE 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Take fatties out of the graph and remap it.

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[–] DoucheBagMcGee 2 points 9 points (+11|-2) ago  (edited ago)

I had to go to the hospital this week in a country outside the US. I seen a doctor, was given antibiotics and some other cold meds.

Since I'm not a citizen, I had to pay full price. The total cost was 90$. Normally citizens would only pay 1/3 of that. The lady at the counter commented that she never seen a bill so expensive. I chuckled a bit and nodded.

Also, it was a walk-in at 6pm.

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[–] Reddiggoat 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

TIL walk-in services cost more than regular in pay-to-win healthcare systems.

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[–] DoucheBagMcGee 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Mostly because anything outside of business hours is an emergency room visit. That's 500$ simply for talking to a doctor in an emergency room.

What a lot of my well-meaning fellow Americans don't get is that healthcare is better pretty much everywhere else. They just have never left their state, let alone their own country to find out.

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[–] Redditsdead 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

It's different province by province, but I hate our healthcare system in Alberta. Our doctors don't want to live anywhere but Edmonton or Calgary, so we rarely get a competent doctor in the rural areas. They all leave for the city as soon as their contracts allow.

I recently had to deal with the system and I was extremely frustrated. I hadn't been in years and had one major issue and 4 minor ones to ask about. After I explained the major issue, she was done with me. Would not address any of my other concerns. Said I'd have to come back for each one, as they are paid per visit.

Our system is not one to aspire to.

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[–] Anoxim 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Do you have a family doctor or did you just go to ER? I can discuss multiple issues at once with my family doctor in fact I saw him last week about my gastric issues as well as my mental health and he addressed all my concerns and I'm scheduled to see a specialist for a scope.

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[–] Redditsdead 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I cannot get a family doctor. Just cannot happen. I've tried for years. Women with kids even have trouble getting one around here.

I went to the walkin clinic where I got treated that way, then went to ER afterwards as I got better service there. I'll only go to the ER now. I might actually try to get a family doctor in Edmonton, 3 hours away. It'll be a better Doctor than I'll get around here.

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[–] Grumpy_Old_Man 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

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[–] Anoxim 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

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[–] pcy623 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

If it bleeds it leads.

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[–] BoiseNTheHood 11 points 3 points (+14|-11) ago 

You've read the spin, now here's the reality:

Confidence in single-payer health care is also eroding in Canada. An August poll commissioned by the Canadian Medical Association found that 78 percent of Canadians over 45 are worried that they won’t be able to access care when they need it. Eighty-one percent of older Canadians say they are worried about the quality of care they will receive.

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/393679/many-failures-single-payer-sally-c-pipes

Single-payer’s cheerleaders cite Canada as proof of the system’s superiority. It’s a foolish fetish: Our northern neighbor’s health-care system is plagued by rationing, long waits, poor-quality care, scarcities of vital medical technologies and unsustainable costs. That’s exactly what’s in store for America if we follow Canada’s lead.

As a native of Canada, I’ve seen this reality firsthand. To keep a lid on costs, Canadian officials ration care. As a result, the average Canadian has to wait 4½ months between getting a referral from his primary-care physician to a specialist for elective medical treatment — and actually receiving it.

Mind you, “elective treatment” in Canada doesn’t mean Botox or a tummy tuck. We’re talking about life-or-death procedures like neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery or cardiovascular surgery.

[...]

The Center for Spatial Economics, a Canadian research outfit, estimates that wait times for just four key procedures — MRI scans and surgeries for joint replacement, cataracts and coronary-artery-bypass grafts — cost Canadian patients $14.8 billion a year in excess medical costs and lost productivity.

Nor is Canadians’ treatment close to “free”: Patients may only have to pay a nominal fee when they get treatment. But the typical Canadian family pays about $11,300 in taxes every year to finance the public-insurance system.

[...]

Because of the low quality of care and long waits in their home country, many Canadians come to the United States for medical attention — over 42,000 in 2012.

Many of these are part of Canada’s political elite. Single-payer may be good enough for their constituents, but it’s apparently not good enough for them.

http://nypost.com/2014/04/16/the-false-promise-of-single-payer-healthcare/

"Back in the 1960s, (Claude) Castonguay chaired a Canadian government committee studying health reform and recommended that his home province of Quebec — then the largest and most affluent in the country — adopt government-administered health care, covering all citizens through tax levies.

The government followed his advice, leading to his modern-day moniker: "the father of Quebec medicare." Even this title seems modest; Castonguay's work triggered a domino effect across the country, until eventually his ideas were implemented from coast to coast."

Four decades later, as the chairman of a government committee reviewing Quebec health care this year, Castonguay concluded that the system is in "crisis."

"We thought we could resolve the system's problems by rationing services or injecting massive amounts of new money into it," says Castonguay. But now he prescribes a radical overhaul: "We are proposing to give a greater role to the private sector so that people can exercise freedom of choice."

http://civitasreview.com/healthcare/father-of-canadian-health-care-admits-its-a-failure/

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[–] DoucheBagMcGee 3 points 8 points (+11|-3) ago  (edited ago)

I posted this elsewhere in the thread, but I'll post it here because you're full of shit:

I had to go to the hospital this week in a country outside the US. I seen a doctor, was given antibiotics and some other cold meds.

Since I'm not a citizen, I had to pay full price. The total cost was 90$. Normally citizens would only pay 1/3 of that. The lady at the counter commented that she never seen a bill so expensive. I chuckled a bit and nodded.

Also, it was a walk-in at 6pm. That's supposed to be impossible, according to you, right?

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[–] rspix000 [S] 7 points 3 points (+10|-7) ago 

Talk about spin, Hoodie. Your top links are always about "confidence/fear" of the populace which is of course driven by the propagandists owned by the plutocrats that profit on the sickness of the populations. Good luck with that, Hoodie. Regardless of "fears" the objective results are better.

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[–] BoiseNTheHood 5 points 3 points (+8|-5) ago 

The actual people who use the system aren't exactly positive or upbeat about its future, but of course you know better than actual Canadians. And, of course, anything that goes against the Marxist narrative must be a big "plutocrat" conspiracy instead of the truth.

If the objective results were better, there wouldn't be thousands of Canadians streaming over the border to get American healthcare every year. Period, full stop, end of story.

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[–] wilwilwesly 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/10/what-if-america-had-canadas-healthcare-system/381662/ "What's more, 57 million fewer people would go without medical care because of the cost. "Roughly 40 percent of both insured and uninsured U.S. respondents spent $1,000 or more out-of-pocket during the year on medical care, not counting premiums," the report authors write. (Though, it's worth noting that the data for the report was collected before the full implementation of Obamacare, which dramatically expanded health insurance coverage in the U.S.)" The links you are posting are all from extremely conservative news sites and Canada ranks above the US i basically all healthcare rankings

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[–] redditrunbyfascists 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

This sounds like manufactured fear to discourage americans from going single payer and having a healthier society.

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[–] wilwilwesly 13 points 3 points (+16|-13) ago 

It's pretty obvious that universal healthcare is the better system.

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[–] OldTrux 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

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[–] redditrunbyfascists 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

and 100% of them report not going bankrupt and losing their life savings.

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