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[–] senpaithatignoresyou 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

A saboteur in Tesla? What are you talking about?

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/tesla-employee-sabotage-illustrates-critical-importance-of-user-permissions/

There was a coder who wrote bad code because they were not promoted. I find that to be bullshit. In IT if you have a good pedigree, and are disrespected in any way, you can leave for a better job in a day. This person could have made a resume, put it out there, and been out the door in a day.

while this sabotage was going on, a lot of investment companies were suspiciously bearish over Tesla, like they knew this was going on. A lot of aerospace companies want to see musk taken out.

Now in the instance of this cave diver, where the hell did he get the money and the means for THREE lawsuits in other countries?

[–] Are_we_sure 1 points 1 points (+2|-1) ago 

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/tesla-employee-sabotage-illustrates-critical-importance-of-user-permissions/

Thanks for this. I wasn't aware of this. However, this appears to an inside disgruntled employee, rather than some coordinated campaign.

Interestingly, the alleged-saboteur, Martin Tripp, claims to be a whistleblower

6/19/18 I was fired by Tesla for providing disturbing information to the media in regards to extremely unsafe batteries/modules, unsafe production methods, and inconsistencies in numbers of cars produced as told by Elon Musk to investors and the general public.

https://www.teslarati.com/teala-former-employee-sabotage-crowdfunding-500k-lawsuit/

Here's something I would like to know what effect Tesla claims the sabotage took. No coder should be able to push their code to a production system without controls. That's the case for everyday honest coders sincerely doing their job. Because while they may fix the one thing they are working on, it may break something else unexpectedly. Or the combination of multiple coders work may break something. This is routine in the software, which is why testing on staging environments before being released to production is standard practice, this is why tools to roll back a code deployment to prior state are standard practice in software.

The saboteur/whistleblower tweeted out several allegations before his lawyer told him to close this account. His lawyer is representing another "whistleblower" against Tesla. https://www.engadget.com/2018/08/15/martin-tripp-tesla-tweets/

Interestingly, both are claiming issues with how Tesla stores raw materials such as copper. Interesting combination of High Tech and Old School metal.

[–] Are_we_sure 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago  (edited ago)

Now in the instance of this cave diver, where the hell did he get the money and the means for THREE lawsuits in other countries?

Why do you think this would take very much money? Especially if his case is strong, many lawyers would take a small fee or no fee upfront as a bet they would might win big money against a billionaire. You know that lawyers often win part of a settlement right?

In a contingent fee arrangement, the lawyer agrees to accept a fixed percentage (often one third) of the recovery, which is the amount finally paid to the client. If you win the case, the lawyer's fee comes out of the money awarded to you.

There are multiple examples of lawyers winning 9 figure contigency fees. https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-biggest-fee-that-a-law-firm-has-received-for-a-single-case#