[–] IShallNotFear 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Here is the archive of the actual article, not just the tweet: http://archive.is/NL0lD

[–] Vindicator 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

What fuckery is up with that title, do you think? The study isn't about blood drinking. It's about transfusions. Drinking it would literally destroy the benefits. You think this is rampant disinfo?

[–] darkknight111 [S] 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Don’t think so. There is a disease (porphyria I think its called) that can be treated by drinking blood. Likely there is something in the blood that is not destroyed by digestion.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/born-to-the-purple-the-st/

https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2017/09/researchers-find-genetic-mutation-responsible-for-vampirism/ I would not br surprised if some sickos drank human blood. Heme is likely not destroyed by digestion.

[–] Kekmet-Peperoni 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yes its porphyria its also known as the "Vampire Disease" It can be passed down genetically and can be caused by blood drinking, so spirit cooking, and transfusions for youth, are likely why it is prevalent amongst the rich. Also Chlorophyll is a perfect ethical replacement for the heme people with porphyria need to replace, its identical to heme except with an inner ring of Magnesium instead of Iron, which shouldnt matter for this purpose. "Heres where it gets crazy" one conspiracy I heard was that JFK was said to have known about all this and wanted to "go straight" so was killed for it because the Purple Scions of the elites families didnt want this new True Blood they wanted their traditions and rituals. Im not sure how true it is but its interesting.

[–] argosciv 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

/cough

Ottoman-linked/inspired propaganda designed to play on bias/fear/superstition and otherwise sensationalize the contents of the article - given that a good portion of people would just see the headline & image and then either ignore the article content or otherwise let it manipulate their perception thereof.

The study isn't disinfo, but, the headlines and images are specifically chosen in order to mess with the audience - be it just for the sake of click-baiting or deliberate manipulation/distraction.

[–] TrishaUK 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I think this post by SKY News gave the impression of 'drinking blood' because of the vampire fangs they have with their article: Young blood an elixir that prevents age-related diseases, study reveals https://news.sky.com/story/drinking-young-blood-could-prevent-age-related-diseases-study-reveals-11493276 However, you are right its injections LOOK at the following article at the bottom of the page!! Baby poo probiotic 'cocktail' could help fight disease, say scientists
https://news.sky.com/story/baby-poo-probiotic-cocktail-could-help-fight-disease-say-scientists-11480738 - EDIT: It does say 'drinking' young blood - https://nypost.com/2018/09/10/young-blood-could-be-the-secret-to-long-lasting-health-study/?utm_source=NYPTwitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow&utm_campaign=SocialFlow

[–] tyfdt 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

https://www.inc.com/jeff-bercovici/peter-thiel-young-blood.html In Monterey, California, about 120 miles from San Francisco, a company called Ambrosia recently commenced one of the trials. Titled “Young Donor Plasma Transfusion and Age-Related Biomarkers,” it has a simple protocol: Healthy participants aged 35 and older get a transfusion of blood plasma from donors under 25, and researchers monitor their blood over the next two years for molecular indicators of health and aging. The study is patient-funded; participants, who range in age from late 30s through 80s, must pay $8,000 to take part, and live in or travel to Monterey for treatments and follow-up assessments.

Ambrosia’s founder, the Stanford-trained physician Jesse Karmazin, has been studying aging for more than a decade. He became interested in launching a company around parabiosis after seeing impressive data from animals and studies conducted abroad in humans: In one trial after another, subjects experience a reversal of aging symptoms across every major organ system. While the mechanisms at play aren’t totally understood, he said, young organisms’ blood not only contains all sorts of proteins that improve cell function; somehow it also prompts the recipients’ body to increase its production of those proteins. “The effects seem to be almost permanent,” he says. “It’s almost like there’s a resetting of gene expression.”

[–] Piscina 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

This article says that thousands of people across the United States drink blood. Some of these people say the oxygen- and iron-enriched substance gives them energy, and none of the drinkers interviewed have had any ill effects from their behavior.

This gives accounts of people who drink blood. It says:

...human blood was considered a bona-fide medical cure. At the end of the 15th Century... Pope Innocent VIII’s physician allegedly bled three young men to death and fed their blood (still warm) to his dying master, with the hope that it might pass on their youthful vitality.

Later on, it was used to treat epilepsy; the afflicted were encouraged to gather around the gallows and collect the warm blood dripping from recently executed criminals.

The question was not “Should you eat human flesh?” says one historian, but, “What sort of flesh should you eat:

... peaking in the 16th and 17th centuries, many Europeans, including royalty, priests and scientists, routinely ingested remedies containing human bones, blood and fat as medicine for everything from headaches to epilepsy.

Blood was procured as fresh as possible, while it was still thought to contain the vitality of the body.

The blood of the living was considered the most potent. Poor people would gather at executions, paying a small amount for a cup of the still-warm blood of the executed. A 1679 recipe from a Franciscan apothecary describes how to make it into marmalade. More from the same article:

Another reason human remains were considered potent was because they were thought to contain the spirit of the body from which they were taken. “Spirit” was considered a very real part of physiology, linking the body and the soul. In this context, blood was especially powerful. “They thought the blood carried the soul, and did so in the form of vaporous spirits,” says Sugg. The freshest blood was considered the most robust. Sometimes the blood of young men was preferred, sometimes, that of virginal young women. By ingesting corpse materials, one gains the strength of the person consumed. Noble quotes Leonardo da Vinci on the matter: “We preserve our life with the death of others. In a dead thing insensate life remains which, when it is reunited with the stomachs of the living, regains sensitive and intellectual life.”

Romans drank the blood of slain gladiators to absorb the vitality of strong young men. Fifteenth-century philosopher Marsilio Ficino suggested drinking blood from the arm of a young person for similar reasons.

[–] Micheal84 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Well look at this!!

https://www.inquisitr.com/5045445/league-of-legends-players-can-now-a-buy-special-edition-skin-by-paying-with-blood/

This was on the news this week, here in the Netherlands.


"Until just recently, the game ran entirely off microtransactions that encouraged players to purchase upgrades for their champions. However, a new form of payment is being introduced: blood

For players living in the Netherlands, they can choose to donate blood to the blood bank Sanquin in exchange for a player skin. The skin, which is an additional outfit for your player, is called “Blood Moon Thresh.” This prize can go for quite a bit of in-game currency, making it a fitting prize for your life-force."


https://eu.lolesports.com/en/articles/sanquin-brings-first-blood-to-the-netherlands

[–] derram 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[–] shewhomustbeobeyed 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[–] thislionsheart 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I wonder if this has something to do with the banning of Qanon as this normalization of blood drinking has been pretty spread out in the past week . I heard harvard supported it.

[–] Samson134 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

How do they know this? Were there test subjects?

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