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[–] SecondAmendment 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Hmm. I have an old PHYSICIANS' DESK REFERENCE and an old copy of THE PILL BOOK on a shelf somewhere. I reckon I'll check them both out for the word "adrenochrome." I also will run that 404'd web address thru the old Internet Archive, aka The Wayback Machine. Finally, I'll skim the ole Podesta Emails for this. You never know what you'll find in those emails, no matter how many times you look through them..... TTYL

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[–] TranshumanismSquared 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

The girl who accused Polanski of assault, well it happened in Jack Nicholson's house. It just so happens that is where a tunnel from the playboy mansion leads. It is rumoured that the snuff was filmed in those corridors underground.

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[–] Flat_Truth [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Here is the full address I linked to last night... the specific page on the now suspended site addiction.org. I also found last night info about a study done in the 1950's with 15 test subjects, but not a lot of info.

https://addictionlibrary.org/illicit/adrenochrome-uses-symptoms-signs-addiction-treatment.html

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[–] OhBlindOne 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

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[–] SecondAmendment 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thanks very much, @Flat_Truth. HERE IT IS. https://web.archive.org/web/20151104143746/https://addictionlibrary.org/illicit/adrenochrome-uses-symptoms-signs-addiction-treatment.html Does anyone know how to archive it? I sure as heck don't. But I'm printing the page, for now. Unreal.

I'll get back to you on what PDR and Pill Book said.

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[–] Flat_Truth [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

good job u guys... for whatever its worth, there's the info that was taken down with oddly coincidental timing.

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[–] Flat_Truth [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

If you are going to search the emails, here are some slang terms known to be used for the drug Adrenochrome: drencrom, milk-plus, the korova milk bar, moloko, qrunq, korova milk bar

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[–] SecondAmendment 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Well, golly, you're just the most amazing colleague, @Flat_Truth. I was just fixin' to get in there and start looking. (Got distracted by some family obligations). Anyway, I'll keep you posted. I need to unwind from life so I'll do a little zooming through the Podesta emails. These slang terms are very helpful. In my house? We don't smoke, drink, or take drugs. We don't know much slang, either. So this is helpful. Stay tuned.

(P.S. Was anyone able to archive this page? https://web.archive.org/web/20151104143746/https://addictionlibrary.org/illicit/adrenochrome-uses-symptoms-signs-addiction-treatment.html )

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[–] Flat_Truth [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Was also thinking with regards to the artwork of Alex Podesta... those big white rabbits (apparently doing bad things to little rabbits).... who spends hundreds of thousands of dollars for his "art"? More plausible is the sale of those art pieces is part of a money laundering program.... to wash money from illegal activities such as human trafficking...drugs...etc.

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[–] SecondAmendment 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Here's the Wayback Machine link to the website that was taken down last night: https://web.archive.org/web/20151104143746/https://addictionlibrary.org/illicit/adrenochrome-uses-symptoms-signs-addiction-treatment.html . Can someone archive it ASAP, please? I really don't know to archive. What I CAN do, however, is paste the text from that archived article. Here y'all go:


ADRENOCHROME: USES, SYMPTOMS, SIGNS AND ADDICTION TREATMENT

Adrenochrome Definition

Adrenochrome is an oxidation product of adrenaline. It is a commonly used psychoactive drug from recreational purposes. Adrenochrome gained its popularity from by H.S. Thompson’s movie “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas”.

Adrenochrome is uncontrolled in the United States, it is considered legal to buy, possess, and distribute. It is not approved for consumption by human. There is little known about this drugs and its long term effects.

Adrenochrome Uses

Adrenochrome is used for is visual and auditory hallucinogenic effects. Studies have shown that Adrenchrome use triggers psychotic reactions like thought disorder, derealization, and euphoria. Large doses of Adrenochrome can result in paralysis, the user is complete aware of their surrounding yet unable to function. The effects of Adrenochrome, when taken at therapeutic doses, are much more mild than that of LSD.

Signs and Symptoms of Adrenochrome

An Adrenochrome user may experience euphoria, confusion, a change in train of thought, lack of judgment, poor insight and inability to concentrate. They will seem out of sorts, as if they are suffering from a mental condition, unable to function properly.

While Adrenochrome is not physically addictive, users may develop a psychological dependency on this drug. They will feel as if they can not experience pleasure without its use.

This begins with regular use of Adrenochrome, resulting in them developing a tolerance to the drug which requires larger doses to acheive the desired effects. Prolonged use at increased doses may result in the psychological dependency. Many Adrenochrome users, if not preexisting, develop psychological disorders. Adrenochrome addiction treatment is required to help them to successfully overcome their addiction and treat any mental or emotional illness.

Adrenochrome Addiction Treatment

Treating an Adrenochroma addiction requires psychological treatment. Patients undergo extensive treatment focusing on their mental and emotional state. Most Adrenochrome users feel as if they can not experience pleasure without its use. They experience strong cravings to use again, during treatment they will learn ways to control these cravings.

A wide array of treatment aspects will be used, including;

Detoxification Individual Counseling Group Counseling Family Counseling Behavioral Modification Therapy Chemical Dependency Education

Related Articles

Qat: Uses, Symptoms, Signs and Addiction Treatment

Stimulants: Uses, Symptoms, Signs and Addiction Treatment

Opium poppy: Uses, Symptoms, Signs and Addiction Treatment

Hallucinogens: Uses, Symptoms, Signs and Addiction Treatment

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[–] Flat_Truth [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You guys are like super sleuths... am thinking Trump ought to replace the FBI with this team.

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[–] ESOTERICshade 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Posting info this senstitive without archiving first is almost guaranteed to get the info nuked where we can never get it back again.

Here is the archive of the sellers.

http://archive.is/InDo7

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[–] Iam7777777 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Pizzagate is now babyblood/babyparts/adrenachrome gate. Simply called cheese. Podesta email "received assortment of cheeses" december24. See satanic calendar. December24. http://www.theopenscroll.com/hosting/SatanicCalendar.htm Google the 1972 Rothschild baby pics/party Was adrenachrome the party favor of choice? Spirit cooking with who knows at this point? On and on it goes.

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[–] jangles 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

yep

[–] [deleted] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Flat_Truth [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Yeah, I read through the one that's now suspended just last night. I can't remember it word for word, but there was a page there specific to Adrenochrome and it listed its use, its effects, and the treatment for addiction. The effects were euphoria... and it did say with large doses, the person could experience paralysis of the body while awake and in a euphoric state.

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[–] ESOTERICshade 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Purple is the color of royalty. Porphyria is called the Vampire's Disease. Vampires don't like the Sun. And I don't feel an ounce of sympathy for the fukrs because raping children and building a child rape culture is not necessary for drinking a little blood.

If they are so malignant to society that it has caused them to poison the entire earth and want to kill all its inhabitants these people need to be put down by some means. We can't empty the whole life boat for these psychos. They have to go overboard.

Born to the Purple: the Story of Porphyria

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/born-to-the-purple-the-st/


Porphyrins are light-activated chemicals that can be used to combat ills including tumors and diseases of the eye. But they have a dark side: when the wrong forms of them build up in the body, they cause a disease called porphyria

Porphyria is named from the ancient Greek word porphura, meaning purple. The Greeks borrowed the term from the Phoenicians, who extracted a purple pigment from purpura mollusks to dye the garments of their royal family. Later, in the Byzantine Empire, the term porphyrogenitos, or "born to the purple," literally meant that the imperial heir was born after the fathers accession to the throne, in a palace room draped in the color.


However, those with the misfortune to be born to the purple involved in porphyria--a group of diseases that result from abnormal accumulations of red and purple pigments produced by the body, called porphyrins--receive far less than royal treatment. There are at least eight types of porphyria, which vary substantially in their symptoms and severity. Historical victims of the worst, most disfiguring forms may have inspired tales of werewolves and vampires. Even today, managing the disease can be challenging. Light-Activated Toxins

Hippocrates is often cited as the first to recognize porphyria (which was then referred to as blood/liver disease) but the causal role of porphyrin pigments was only established in 1871 by the great German pioneer of biochemistry Felix Hoppe-Seyer. In 1889, Dr. B.J. Stokvis described the clinical syndrome as "porphyria," and from then on more and more forms of the syndrome were discovered.


All the versions of porphyria have one thing in common: they each result from faults in the bodys heme-building machinery. Heme, a component of the oxygen transporter hemoglobin, is made in a sequence of eight steps, as in a factory assembly line. Each step is catalyzed by a separate enzyme. If any of these eight steps fails because of an inherited genetic mutation or an environmental toxin, then the whole assembly line gets jammed. The products of the earlier steps, porphyrin intermediates, may build up to toxic levels. These porphyrins accumulate in the skin and other organs before being excreted in feces and urine (which may turn a port-wine color). Exposed to light, the porphyrins can turn caustic and destroy surrounding tissue.

(Put to medical use, drugs containing porphyrins can attack tumors and other ailments. Unlike most natural porphyrins [but like chlorophyll] these drugs are not purple but green, as they have been modified chemically so that they absorb light at wavelengths that can penetrate into biological tissues. See "New Light on Medicine," by Nick Lane; Scientific American, January 2003.)


Exactly which porphyrins accumulate depends on the site of the jam, and it is this that gives porphyria such a wide range of symptoms. The severity of the jam also varies. In some cases the jam is total, preventing any heme synthesis at all. In others, it is only partial, permitting limited heme synthesis. The blockage of the assembly line also means that the body cannot make enough heme to produce normal red blood cells. Some of these abnormal red cells rupture, leading to hemolytic anemia, while the spleen detects abnormalities in other red cells and breaks them down, making matters worse.


Werewolves and Vampires

One of the more common types of the disease is acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), which famously afflicted the unfortunate King George III of Britain--the "mad king" of Alan Bennetts play. In AIP the most notable symptoms are neurological attacks, such as trances, seizures and hallucinations, which often persist over days or even weeks. Luckily, most people with AIP have a latent form, and never develop any symptoms.


Another relatively common form is porphyria cutanea tardea, which presents a very different spectrum of symptoms.In this case, the hallmark is photosensitivity (an excessive reaction to light), which causes chronic blistering and even burns on sun-exposed areas. Healing is slow and is associated with scarring and hair growth, especially on the face. Most of the time the facial hairs are fine, so the hirsutism is barely noticeable. Sometimes, however, the hair growth can give the appearance of a werewolf, leading to speculations that the myths may have had a medical basis.


In congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), one of the rarest forms, 18 different mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme uroporphyrinogen III cosynthase have been reported in different families. These mutations obstruct heme synthesis to varying degrees, giving a spectrum of severity. At its worst, CEP causes appalling photomutilations from the light-activated porphyrins, including loss of facial features and fingers, scarring of the cornea and blindness. The condition may have been less rare in the past, especially in isolated pockets where inbreeding could occur such as the valleys of Transylvania--perhaps giving rise to tales of vampires.


While the accumulation of porphyrins is usually caused by a genetic mutation, toxins (such as alcohol excess) and environmental contaminants can also cause the disease. The most notorious environmental episode happened in Turkey in the 1950s, when 4,000 people developed a form of porphyria after eating wheat seeds that had been sprayed with a fungicide, hexachlorobenzene. Hundreds died, and use of the fugicide was later banned around the world.


Methods of Treatment

In most cases of porphyria, blood or heme transfusions can supply some relief from the symptoms, and this is still the mainstay of treatment. Interestingly, the heme pigment is robust enough to survive digestion, and is absorbed from the intestine (even though the protein parts of hemoglobin are broken down). This means that, in principle, it is possible to relieve the symptoms of porphyria by drinking blood--another possible link with the vampire stories.


Heme infusions help in the treatment of porphyria patients in two ways. First, they overcome the bodys shortage of heme, relieving anemia. Second, the extra heme suppresses further heme synthesis via a negative feedback loop. This effectively switches off the assembly line, bringing an end to the production of toxic porphyrin intermediates. Drawing blood (phlebotomy) can also help, because this quickly removes porphyrin intermediates from the circulation. In most cases, some degree of normality can be restored within a few days of an attack.


In the more serious forms of porphyria such as CEP, however, treatments are less effective. Sometimes the spleen must be removed in an attempt to treat the hemolytic anemia. In CEP, the genetic fault affects the stem cells in the bone marrow, which divide to produce new red blood cells. In principle, CEP can be cured by bone-marrow transplantation, which replaces the faulty stem cells with fully functional ones. Bone-marrow transplants have been carried out successfully in at least five children with CEP, usually within the first few years of life. The treatment apparently cures the disease over a period of years.


Future Therapies

But bone-marrow transplantation presents its own challenges, and is considered a last resort. In the longer term, hope to cure porphyria is invested in gene therapy, in which the faulty genes are replaced with functional ones using a virus as a vector (delivery method). The technique has been shown to be effective in cell culture, but there is still a long way to go before gene therapy for CEP can be used in clinical practice.

Other future treatments for porphyria will depend on the results obtained from research with experimental animal--and even plant--models. Some of these are improbable, to say the least. For example, all fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) have a gene defect that gives them a form of CEP, yet they do not suffer any adverse consequences, for unknown reasons. Studies of the animals could yield clues that would be useful in fighting CEP.


Surprisingly, even plants--which use the green porphyrin, chlorophyll, to absorb light energy--can suffer from a condition analogous to porphyria. Plants make chlorophyll via a pathway very similar to that for heme production in animals. Mutations in the gene for the final step in this pathway lead to a buildup of porphyrins in the leaves. On exposure to sunlight the leaves blister, and eventually wither and die. The process is so similar to human porphyria that some researchers hope to find a cure for the human condition by studying the properties of so-called "vampire plants," like maize.

Nick Lane studied biochemistry at Imperial College, University of London. His doctoral research, at the Royal Free Hospital, was on oxygen free radicals and metabolic function in organ transplants. Lane is an honorary senior research fellow at University College London and strategic director at Adelphi Medi Cine, a medical multimedia company based in London. His book, Oxygen: the Molecule That Made the World, is being published by Oxford University Press in the spring of 2003.

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[–] ESOTERICshade 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Something somebody posted that I saved a while back.


Original thread in its entirety:

As we all know, the Clinton Foundation was all over Haiti when the earthquake happened and that people of course went missing and rumors of organ harvesting abound.

I just watched a video in regards to Houston and what might be happening there due to Harvey's destruction. I don't want to go into the video too much because it would appear to be too loosely related to PG, but here's how it's related:

As you're watching the video that's linked at the end of this thread, please consider 1) organ harvesting 2) people shuttled to places of containment 3) missing people 4) blood drives/donations/type casting 5) what we know happens to cops, investigators, and others who aren't in "the club" 6) schizophrenia and how it's related to adrenochrome

Adrenochrome is formed in the body, but we do not know whether more is formed in schizophrenics or where it is made, or are schizophrenics more suscep-tible to the effects of the aminochromes because they lack antioxidants or other protective factors. Future research will set-tle these issues. We need to know where the transformation occurs, in what quan-tities, and why. We need to know the end products of catecholamine oxidation and their pathways. We need to know which enzymes are involved and/or dam-aged, and we need more effective blocking agents which are effective in smaller doses but have the safety, and efficacy of vitamins.

Adrenolutin is another derivative of adrenochrome and more stable in blood. Hoffer and Kenyon (1957) showed that the compound made in blood from adrenaline (Leach and Heath, 1956), was adrenolutin. Leach and Heath found that the rate of con-version was greater in schizophrenic blood compared to normal blood.

I know I may seem like I'm going way out in left field, but hang with me just a bit longer, and consider how many homeless people are alcoholics. Also think about how PG researchers believe that adrenochrome is one of the major factors at play with SRA.

Only three of the aminochromes have been tested for hallucinogenic properties: adrenochrome, adrenolutin and leuko-adrenochrome (5.6 dihydroxy N Methyl in-dole). The first two are hallucinogens but the third is not. On the contrary, it is a very effective anti-anxiety compound when given sublingually for some very tense in-dividuals, producing an effect within five to ten minutes. The evidence for these con-clusions is available in The Hallucinogens (Hoffer, Osmond, 1967; Hoffer, 1962). The reactions induced by adrenochrome and by adrenolutin are somewhat different. Adrenolutin causes changes which are more subtle, with fewer perceptual illusions. It tends to flatten mood more and its effect lasts longer. Adrenochrome causes more perceptual changes but they are rarely as pronounced as those caused by LSD or mescalin. Its effect may last a long time. It produced a two-week paranoid depression in one of us (A.H.) and a one-week paranoid depressive reaction with visual illusions in a distinguished colleague of ours.

Adrenochrome potentiated the activity of LSD in a few alcoholics.

Between 1954 and 1962 we treated several thousand alcoholics with psychedelic therapy using LSD, usually 200 to 400 mcg. In the usual reaction the first changes would occur in about one hour. Increased anxiety was usually the first reaction. Within two hours they would ex-perience the usual reaction. Anxiety would fluctuate but was seldom high or a prob-lem. However, many alcoholics did not have the usual reaction even with 400 mcg. They remained very tense and uncomfortable all the time. This group did not profit from their experience. In a few patients an in-jection of adrenochrome after two hours would, within a few minutes, bring on the typical LSD reaction. We concluded that LSD did not act as an hallucinogen per se but that it induced an increase in the pro-duction of adrenochrome which was the hallucinogen. An individual who could not make enough adrenochrome would not be able to have the typical LSD reaction. This conclusion was supported by our earlier finding that vitamin B3 markedly reduced the intensity of LSD reactions whether given before or during the LSD reaction. By blocking the adrenochrome effect it would also block the effect of LSD. It would also explain why Brom LSD, a very potent antiserotonin, would not be an hallucino-gen. Brom LSD probably has no effect on adrenalin oxidation and would not increase the formation of adrenochrome. These are interesting speculations. Perhaps now with increasing interest in free radical hypoth-eses and in oxidized derivatives of the catecholamines, scientists will direct their interest back into these areas.

Maybe, in order to see the entire evil picture, we need to expand our manner of thinking and consider how PG involves much more than the children. While the kids are of course the main source of our concerns, the PG spider's web is vast and wide.

For those who do not believe the adrenochrome angle of PG, consider the following taken from the same webpage as the above info:

Adrenochrome and adrenolutin are hallucinogenic. We need more information about the other aminochromes. We need to know which synapses are inhibited, which receptors are involved.

Inhibiting the formulation of adreno-chrome is therapeutic. We need to know why the orthomolecular approach works.

That the adrenochrome hypothesis is not destroyed does not prove it is correct. Time will tell. It does prove it is a good, testable hypothesis and will continue to direct research in future as it has in the past. Why, then, has it been ignored for nearly thirty years?

We may be too close to the subject to really understand the reasons why the adrenochrome hypothesis has been ignored for so long. It did receive a certain amount of notoriety at the beginning, but it was quickly shot down by American psychia-trists led by the National Institute of Men-tal Health. A medical historian may one day be able to examine the issues more capa-bly. In our opinion, there were two main classes of opinion: scientific, and political. The political opposition prevented any se-rious examination of the consequences of the adrenochrome hypothesis. Inadequate as it then was, it was able to direct our re-search in Saskatchewan for 15 years, and could have been examined much more quickly and thoroughly by research insti-tutes which grew very quickly in the U.S.A., beginning in 1955.

Link to adrenochrome info quoted above: http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1999/articles/1999-v14n01-p049.shtml, http://archive.is/APvcD

Please watch the following 10 minute video while considering everything I mentioned above and all that we believe PG encompasses. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pfs39BizmSYYouTube

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