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[–] Freshdough 2 points 50 points (+52|-2) ago 

I support this 100%. I was raised this way and do everything I can to limit the amount of participation garbage that my kids receive every year. It's hard in this day and age to get people to understand the value of hard work and being a true "winner" and the value of sometimes being a "loser".

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[–] Numzane 1 points 13 points (+14|-1) ago 

Well said. You're a good parent. I'm an educator and it really bothers me how we reward mediocrity. I don't believe in the "win at all costs" mentality but I think it's really important to instil in kids a desire to win. Which real awards do.

At my school we also bow to parents pressure to put their kid on a team when that kid wasn't good enough to make the team. Dissapointment is a learning experience. And being able to handle dissapointment develops good sportsmanship and character.

What are we teaching them by rescuing them from dissapointment?! At some point they're going to need to stand on their own after we're gone.

*rant over. I can't express this at work because it's would be a career limiting move if management heard.

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[–] Freshdough 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thanks for that. My wife is also an educator and she definitely has moments where she's torn because she loves her kids but also sees what rewarding mediocrity can do. Having quarterly award ceremonies is the most ridiculous thing to me but it's a requirement for these teachers to do it. I do love how she will put a significant reward out there for completing a very hard task such as doubling or even tripling their AR score. When the other kids see a few eating a Happy Meal that they could have earned for actually trying it does give them a little motivation to try harder the next time. Unfortunately I see this in my workplace more and more these days with young adults expecting me to reward them with a raise or promotion for merely showing up. Excuse me, you need to show me why you deserve this raise and why I should put you in a leadership position. I recently stepped out of my management role because it became to frustrating to be a constant babysitter to these kids. The old adage "If it's worth doing, then it's worth doing right and complete" doesn't apply most young adults under 30 these days. I fear for our future generations if we can't figure out a way to change this mindset.

By the way, my dad was a teacher, my MIL taught for a long time and now my wife is an educator as well. I have so much respect for all of you because I can see now how much my wife loves what she does. I know she's driven by the chance that she can make even one of her "kids" lives somehow better.

Thanks for all you do.

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[–] sillymanilly 4 points 20 points (+24|-4) ago 

I wonder how long it will be before we hear child protective services is looking into the guy. You just know the sjws are plotting his demise as you read this.

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[–] Crashmarik 2 points 16 points (+18|-2) ago 

There's a father that really loves his children. It's a shame so many people don't get that mollycoddling children doesn't do them any favors.

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[–] Amelia_Earnhardt_Jr 10 points 12 points (+22|-10) ago  (edited ago)

Trophies-for-everyone is exactly why we have so many 18-35 year olds living at home doing jack shit and bitching about the economy. You don't get jobs just by showing up and applying, no matter how much you think you deserve them. Tough shit. Quit crying and be more fit, it's grade school evolutionary science.

Every business you walk in to is employing dozens or hundreds of people, if you can't get hired you're not qualified to be a part of that right now. Tough shit. We currently live in an economy that values intelligent, hard-workers and physically attractive people. Everyone gets a trophy turned in to everyone gets a paycheck.

EDIT: and I'm 28 with a liberal arts degree, there are no excuses. There's a tech boom in California, a green boom in Colorado and an oil boom in the Dakotas and Texas, get to work.

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[–] BrianFellow 6 points 3 points (+9|-6) ago 

No, there being more people than jobs for them is why so many people don't have jobs. And I suppose you think that those who aren't intelligent or good looking should just starve? (Just being hard working isn't enough.)

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[–] didntsayeeeee 2 points 8 points (+10|-2) ago 

A "job" isn't donating that falls from the sky. We don't have a fixed number of jobs the same way we have a fixed number of ten-digit prime numbers. A job is something you create for yourself when you figure out a way if using your labour to create value. The universe contains an infinite number of ways to do this.

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[–] TalkingAnimal 2 points 1 points (+3|-2) ago 

No, there being more people than jobs for them is why so many people don't have jobs

There are actually similar numbers of people and jobs. The problem is search frictions. If I live in Detroit and lost a job as a welder or mechanic and there aren't enough jobs for welders and mechanics in my area, but there is a job for a mechanic in Oakland, that's a search friction. My whole life is in Detroit. There is a significant barrier to me getting the job in San Francisco.

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[–] Amelia_Earnhardt_Jr 2 points 0 points (+2|-2) ago 

No they shouldn't starve, we have welfare for those who can't make themselves useful.

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[–] User_5X22_Dawn 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Here's what they should be doing. When your kid gets 4th place, and he's pissed off, he shouldn't get anything. When he's angry and if he acts out at all you have a talk with him about what it means to be respectful and honorable of someone who did better than you. You explain to him that in sports it does matter to win, but its not honorable to throw a fucking temper tantrum. This way, when he applies for that great job and doesn't get it, he respectfully bows out and goes home to look for more jobs instead of complaining about the economy.

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[–] conundrumbombs 2 points 0 points (+2|-2) ago 

Should Olympic athletes be deprived of a bronze medal? (Serious question.)

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[–] barset 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I wouldn't go that far. Third best in the Olympics is still leagues ahead of your kids team not making the playoffs or not winning the city championship.

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[–] User_5X22_Dawn 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I think it depends. You have these small towns where there's only 3 teams in little league, so third place is last place? You have towns where there's 12 teams, 3rd place is more meaningful. In the case of Olympics, yes I think a bronze medal is fine. Those are the best athletes in the world. The token trophy for the Olympics is going there.

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[–] Zaqwert 2 points 4 points (+6|-2) ago 

Good for him. "Congratulations, here's your 'award'"

Award for what exactly?

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[–] ShinyVoater 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I can understand the basic sentiment of not wanting to let kids go home empty-handed, but you shouldn't get something to proudly display as a way of saying "I participated!". If you're giving out trophies, make it a ribbon; if you're only handing out ribbons, make the participation ribbons plain and the prize ribbons more impressive(and it should probably stick to naming the event and avoid the word "participation"). That way everybody gets a momento, but without the ego-inflating, setting-up-to-fail nature of pretending it's a prize.

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[–] Thatdrumdude 1 points 2 points (+3|-1) ago 

Good for him. I always hated the trophies for everyone shit. The only place that that is mildly acceptable in the special Olympics, and even then it's questionable. I hate this whole "everyone is a winner policy" because it removes competition and the urge to be better. If everyone wins, then what the fuck is the purpose of even trying. It makes people in the sport weaker, and makes the sport weaker.

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[–] conundrumbombs 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I honestly don't know why people pretend that participation trophies mean anything to begin with. If you are against the "trophies for everyone" philosophy, fine. I get it. But they are just as meaningless as nothing in the first place. I've always been fascinated by the fact that people take this issue as seriously as they do. I don't know what ever happened to my T-ball trophy, and I don't care.

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