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[–] SterlingItachiArcher 3 points 212 points (+215|-3) ago  (edited ago)

Now this is news.

Hopefully CP isn't conveniently found on her computer,

Or we find out she had a history of depression...

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[–] cgsur 0 points 74 points (+74|-0) ago 

So sprinkled crack would not cut it?

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[–] ProfKraken 0 points 76 points (+76|-0) ago 

Thanks to Snowden we know that not only does the NSA keep tabs on everything we do online, they have manipulated manufacturers into giving them unrestricted access to you hardware.

CP is the perfect weapon. It destroys all credibility of anyone even tangentially related to it, the public openly condemns the accused with little evidence, possession carries massive sentences, and it can easily be planted from a distance via the internet.

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[–] jaceame 0 points 18 points (+18|-0) ago 

Not when most politicians do drugs. Only some of them are into kiddie porn.

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[–] hellrazor 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Sprinkling CP is the new sprinkling crack.

21
-20

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[–] flimflamedthezimzam 0 points 42 points (+42|-0) ago 

It's a shame she was just such a terrible driver...

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[–] blackblarneystone 0 points 31 points (+31|-0) ago 

people are now able to remotely hack vehicles and take control

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[–] Brolo_El_Cunado 0 points 23 points (+23|-0) ago 

I think she is about to win a brand new Jeep in a raffle she didn't enter...

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[–] faissaloo 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

"But my uncle always wore a seatbelt, he was a VERY careful man" "Not careful enough"

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[–] Quawonk 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Or she'll have a "car accident".

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[–] iamrage 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Nah bro, she'll commit suicide by shooting herself twice in the head.

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[–] SterlingItachiArcher 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

From the back right?

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[–] gbj1301 [S] 0 points 195 points (+195|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Here is her blog where she discusses her findings.

My statistical analysis shows patterns indicative of vote manipulation in machines. The manipulation is relatively small, compared with the inherent variability of election results, but it is consistent. These results form a pattern that goes across the nation and back a number of election cycles. I’ve downloaded data and verified the results from several states for myself. Furthermore, the manipulation is not limited to a single powerful operator. My assessment is that the data reveals multiple (at least two) agents working independently to successfully alter voting results.

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[–] PainTree 0 points 76 points (+76|-0) ago 

The professional tone of her writing makes me happy. It looks like the politicians are going to have a lot of trouble discrediting her.

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[–] Tooth 0 points 40 points (+40|-0) ago 

probably, as always, nobody cares, which is a shame

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[–] RewriteFullwise 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

They don't need to discredit, she'll just become an unperson.

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[–] Imapopulistnow 0 points 20 points (+20|-0) ago 

About time this third world country of ours adopts paper ballots and blue thumbs.

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[–] diafeetus 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

These results form a pattern that goes across the nation and back a number of election cycles.

So...that close election in 2000 when Bush won.....

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[–] sp00kygh0st 2 points 91 points (+93|-2) ago 

Is it bad that this isn't even surprising anymore?

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[–] Mr_YUP 0 points 99 points (+99|-0) ago 

It's not that it's a surprise. It's that someone finally found concrete numbers to back it up.

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[–] Sorahzahd 0 points 59 points (+59|-0) ago  (edited ago)

We already knew these voting machines are totally unsecured and ripe for manipulation (and apparently built for that express purpose). There have been multiple security researchers that have published these results. The data has existed for years.

Anyone with a knowledge of software development can tell you that it's no "accident" that Diebold's voting machines were built on MS Access and VBA. Both laughably unsecured systems.

It's just that it's easier to claim "conspiruccy thurry" and shut off one's brain, than it is to actually admit that voting machines were built for the express purpose of manipulating elections.

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[–] ivegotaqueso 0 points 14 points (+14|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Ahhh Florida, year 2000...and 2004....how everyone knew...but nothing ever came of it.

I wonder what the US would've been like, if Gore won in 2000. We definitely wouldn't have gone to war in Iraq over the "WMDs" that turned out to be abandoned trucks. Less than 1,000 Florida votes pushed Bush past Gore too. That shit was so shady.

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[–] Beers 1 points 27 points (+28|-1) ago  (edited ago)

After hearing about black box voting machines for years, this is almost a relief. Maybe only after widespread election fraud will society learn that trust and computing do not go well together, AT ALL. Sometimes everything has to burn before it can be rebuilt correctly... Maybe what we really need is the complete realization that our elections are fake, our government is fake, our destiny is controlled, etc. Maybe what we need is collapse...

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[–] nonoyesyes 1 points 18 points (+19|-1) ago 

Code can only be trusted if it is free (free as in freedom).

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.en.html

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[–] Kad 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

Yeah, personally I'm excited for September! Good luck shemitah-chan!!

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[–] Network 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I think a candidate would need to get 100% of the votes for anyone to do anything about it.

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[–] I_EAT_THOUGHTS 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I think collapse would only create a horrible power vacuum that would be exploitable by equally bad or even worse people. Especially considering how divided present day America is, there is no way anything good would come of any such thing. If there was any kind of consensus to the point that force would make sense, force wouldn't be necessary anymore. I think our futures are going to be defined by our capacity to be compassionate and to understand and care about each other, to find common ground and stand on it together, and enact change civilly. I could be wrong, but from here that doesn't look too feasible... But violence, I don't think that looks too feasible either.

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[–] mamwad 0 points 72 points (+72|-0) ago  (edited ago)

A paper trail is necessary for free elections. I'm as pro-technology as anyone, but it makes you question whether electronic voting is a good idea when computer science scholars are some of its most vocal opponents. The documentary Invisible Ballots goes into this thoroughly. ~I will add the link in a moment.~

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[–] SecureRhino 0 points 35 points (+35|-0) ago 

Of course electronic voting is problematic. And the pure act of Kansas denying her to check the paper trail smells of fraud. Even worse that most places apparently don't even have a paper trail.

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[–] Zodi 0 points 15 points (+15|-0) ago 

'we accidentally shredded those documents"

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[–] Sorahzahd 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago 

Of course electronic voting is problematic.

This implies that the current voting machines being totally unsecured is an accident, though, which isn't the case and is a different situation than that we find ourselves in.

In reality, it's obvious to anyone with knowledge of software development and security practices that the ONLY legitimate reason for voting machines to be built on MS Access and VBA is so that they are easy to manipulate.

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[–] weezkitty 1 points 7 points (+8|-1) ago 

No matter the method, they will find a way to corrupt it.

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[–] mamwad 0 points 21 points (+21|-0) ago 

Certain voting systems are more easily exploitable than others. Just because risk can never be eliminated doesn't mean that you shouldn't try to limit it.

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[–] philomath 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

The term, "hanging chads" comes to mind.

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[–] Imapopulistnow 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Doesn't mean we should make it easy.

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[–] docdub 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You can do a paper trail with electronic voting. Just put a receipt printer on the individual machines. After you vote, you check your receipt. If there is a mistake, you talk to a poll worker to fix it. If it is correct, then you put the receipt into a lock box at the poll. People do not leave the poll with the receipt.

If there is a recount, the paper receipts are hand counted. During the down time between elections, paper receipts can be counted to audit the accuracy of the electronic machines.

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[–] mamwad 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

I fail to see how that is better than what we already had, though. Ballots are electronically counted anyway. It doesn't make sense to spend extra money on the voting machines.

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[–] DingleMyCringle 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

My county's machines use scantrons essentially. You use a sharpy to draw a line next to the person you're voting for and they are fed into a machine.

Bam - paper trail, instant results, and as idiot proof as you can make it.

[–] [deleted] 1 points 35 points (+36|-1) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] pinguinos 0 points 56 points (+56|-0) ago 

It's more than just Kansas

These results form a pattern that goes across the nation and back a number of election cycles. I’ve downloaded data and verified the results from several states for myself.

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[–] cgsur 1 points 12 points (+13|-1) ago 

A few links I checked a few years ago from one particular company, although the problems with evoting are widespread. Political and business relationships concerning this whole issue are clear as mud, some of these "investigations" are not very impartial. Investigating the guys you hired to see if they might make you look bad has a chance of being compromised.

http://www.rense.com/general70/forget.htm

http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/foreign-policy/263013-smartmatics-bogus-claims-about-venezuela-election

http://www.alternet.org/story/86135/voting_machine_ceo_reportedly_lies_about_foreign_ownership_of_firm

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/29/washington/29ballot.html?pagewanted=print

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/30/AR2006103001224.html

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[–] Tangent-love 0 points 7 points (+7|-0) ago 

this is what i found most frightening. local is nothing compared to the organisation it would take to do this nation wide.

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[–] SecureRhino 0 points 20 points (+20|-0) ago 

According to the article it's throughout the United States, Kansas just has a paper trail that would allow you to detect it (if somebody would be allowed to actually check the paper trail).

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[–] Monkstar1 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

As citizens of the United States, aren't we allowed to view the paper trail?

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[–] mrmyxlplyx 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

"Toto, we're not in Kansas anymore. Oh wait.... yes we are. ... Shit."

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[–] FatPeopleHater- 0 points 30 points (+30|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Guys it's ok.. They state of Kansas didn't realize that she contacted them about obtaining a sample of data. Must've been a mix up

She then sought a court order giving her access to a sample of voting records in order to check voting machines’ error rates. This order was ignored by the Secretary of State’s office, despite their being legally required to respond to her within 30 days. The office later said that they didn’t realize they had received her request.>

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[–] Zodi 0 points 27 points (+27|-0) ago 

So they're "legally required" to respond, and they didn't.

What is the punishment for breaking the law? Nothing. It doesn't matter that the law was broken. there is no punishment or repercussion for ignoring it.

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[–] Sorahzahd 0 points 9 points (+9|-0) ago 

What is the punishment for breaking the law? Nothing.

Exactly the reason why Diebold and others felt they could create deliberately compromised voting machines and get away without facing consequences.

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[–] Steelcap 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

Well, it is now possible for a judge to order compliance through a writ of mandamus, failure to comply with which is punishable by contempt of court.

It's not a great justice system we have, but essentially every judge is a little dictator and defends his power ruthlessly, Thus if the position comes before a judge, it is troublesome to disrespectfully disregard that judge's action.

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[–] localbum 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Shoot, looks like I have a pretty rock-solid excuse for those unpaid parking tickets then, eh?! Eh? Anyone?

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[–] Balrogic 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I mean, unless you show up with a law enforcement raid at your back and arrest everyone that obstructs you.

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[–] GenevieveJenkins 0 points 11 points (+11|-0) ago 

Mitt Romney could have received over a million extra votes in the 2012 Republican primary

Why am I not surprised...

[–] [deleted] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] deathcomesilent 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

A million people is a lot when you consider voter turnout and the fact that this was a primary, not the general election.

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[–] Megaptera 1 points 11 points (+12|-1) ago 

gasp corruption? In politics!?

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[–] Vorontsov 0 points 6 points (+6|-0) ago 

And water continues to be wet, and delicious.

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[–] Megaptera 2 points 5 points (+7|-2) ago 

Except in California, and wherever they fluoridate and chlorinate it.

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