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[–] TheKarmakazie [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

That is actually one of the parts of the article I disagree with. Minimalism is relevant for both those who are poverty stricken and those with money. I was raised in poverty and was in some ways forced into minimalism because I could not afford many things. I still had a wonderful childhood. I just focused more on relationships and entertaining myself by reading or any of my other inexpensive habits. As I grew up and made a living on my own, I fell into materialism to some degree. After a few years of it I reflected on what really mattered to me and came back to minimalism. Even though I am now no longer under the poverty line I have benefited from minimalism.

In short:

Being poor / minimalism allowed me to focus on what I had friends and family, it also led to me reading more (library is free) and getting creative with in-exspensive hobbies, not what was missing, material things. No longer being poor / minimalism is helping lead to early retirement and also same benefits as before.

Another point is Joshua Fields Millburn who is mentioned in your quote is dedicating his life to minimalism. Not only that but he is preaching the gospel (metaphorically speaking of course). Source.

As far as Buddhism being hard? I can not comment on that as I am not Buddhist.

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