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[–] alotofwastedeffort 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Hey there! UI/UX designer, formerly a branding designer here!

What you have to realize is that this feeling is completely normal and natural. Companies out there actually hinge on this feeling that's generated from a purchase. It's essentially an internal reward system. If you feel sad or incomplete for some reason, your brain knows that the purchase of an item triggers a tiny reward, and you'll be happy for a short period of time.

The trick is realizing this, and then finding ways to replace that feeling. For instance, instead of purchasing something, try accomplishing something. This will also trigger your internal reward system, and perhaps for a much longer period, depending on the objective. Try small, accomplishable things at first, and then move on to higher goals.

Maybe learn some programming skills. Maybe you've wanted to finally start exercising. Maybe it was to finally clean out that closet you have. Whatever the goal, make sure that it's something accomplishable in a short period of time for the first go-around, and then move onward and upward from there.

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[–] Vagabond_Squirrel 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'd say challenge yourself and ask were exactly the pleasure happens. I like to think of objects having costs higher than the tag. When the happiness of owning the object comes from purchasing and not using it in my life, I'm paying for maintenance that I wont be using. Thus giving myself a bad deal.

Best example I do of this is antiques. I admire the craftsmanship and story behind the objects, although I wouldn't find use for a lot of them. Browsing the store is the joy in this case.

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[–] Andman17 [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

So browser but don't purchase? Sounds good.

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[–] mifiaba 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'm not good with anything like this particularly... but maybe challenge yourself slowly.. don't buy anything for a day. NO EXCEPTIONS (unless a REAL emergency). Stretch that to a week (maybe allow groceries).. 2 weeks? When you are about to buy something, stop and think.. do I need this? will I use this in the immediate future? if the answer is no.. don't let yourself by it.

I'm sure its not as simple as this but no harm in trying?

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[–] Andman17 [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

No harm at all. I can go a day without buying stuff easy. Even a week, two weeks sometimes. It's just the pleasure I get. I don't like it.

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[–] greiierg 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

"Self-control is the chief element in self-respect,

and self-respect is the chief element in courage."

--Thucydides

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[–] twomoreandatinkle 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Easy, just don't have any money to buy stuff. Lose you job, drug addiction, gambling just to mention a few. Good luck!

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[–] mifiaba 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

o_o... I don't recommend this method, but it probably is very successful

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[–] HumanityProxy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

What hole are you filling inside with the stuff you buy?

In my case, I want to retire early. This requires hoarding money and dumping it into investments while living like a pauper. Every dumb thing I buy is that many more years, weeks, days, hours that I'll have to spend working.

It's good motivation.

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[–] TeranNotTerran 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I find that not the act of buying brings me pleasure, but the act of using something useful.

I think minimalism is most effective when used as a question in daily life: What is the net-cost to owning this thing? It applies to more than just ownership, of course.

You can be miserable with everything and miserable with nothing. There is a middle ground.

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[–] Night_Heron 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Rethink retailers as a honey-trap, which they are. But that doesn't mean you don't need stuff or take pleasure in the hunt for things. It's primal, just don't go broke doing it.

Replace "buying retail" with three things: 1) borrow, 2) barter, 3) buy used. It takes more effort and time, and more thought, to wrangle a deal or do the legwork to get an item at 1/2 off, or free through barter.

My mother is poor, because she wastes all her money. She never buys big-ticket items, either, it is a death-by-1,000-cuts mode. $10 for this, $15 for that, $20 from the ATM.

Perhaps using a program like Mint and creating savings goals would be a good substitute. Or maybe saving up money to buy shares of stocks in companies you like could give you a rush and be good for your future.

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