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[–] R34p_Th3_Wh0r1w1nd [S] 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago 

My buddy works for the county, he sent me this. So, this thing was in with a bunch of debris washed up in the Indian River lagoon (cesspool). It was about to be put in a chipper when a passerby recognized what it was. He pulled over and had the workers help pull it out of the pile. It will wind up in a museum.

That's all I got. I thought it was kind of cool.

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[–] NeedleStack 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

This picture was used for this article recently on this discovery. Awesome discovery and congrats to your friend.

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[–] newoldwave 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

interesting... Thanks for post

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[–] GOMAD_OR_GFYAD 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Who says it's ancient indian?

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[–] ElDulce 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago  (edited ago)

So I don't know if it was an update or what, but at the bottom of the article it now says

A state spokesperson said the canoe is still being evaluated, but they've already noticed square nails, remnants of paint chips and the fact that it was likely buried and unexposed to the elements in the river.

So it has square nail holes. Well those date the shit out of it. There were no nails in America before the colonists showed up and even then they were rare. Square nails are also referred to as cut nails.

The slitting mill, introduced to England in 1590, simplified the production of nail rods, but the real first efforts to mechanise the nail-making process itself occurred between 1790 and 1820, initially in the United States and England, when various machines were invented to automate and speed up the process of making nails from bars of wrought iron. These nails were known as cut nails or square nails because of their roughly rectangular cross section.

And here are some dates.

The cut-nail process was patented in America by Jacob Perkins in 1795 and in England by Joseph Dyer, who set up machinery in Birmingham. The process was designed to cut nails from sheets of iron, while making sure that the fibres of the iron ran down the nails. The Birmingham industry expanded in the following decades, and reached its greatest extent in the 1860s, after which it declined due to competition from wire nails, but continued until the outbreak of World War I.[9]

Meaning this thing was most likely built between 1840ish and the beginning of the 1900s. Again, it was probably someones failed drunk experiment. Because who the fuck builds a 500lb canoe.

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] theoldones 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

its been sitting under a river for who knows long, and needs restoration by experts. i suspect this is not what they looked like in prime condition

[–] [deleted] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

[Deleted]

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[–] Pawn 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

From back before the Indians had all the different kinds of land-niggers come over to their country.

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[–] ElDulce 5 points -3 points (+2|-5) ago 

I think it's kind of awesome that someone tried to make a canoe like this, but fuck man, there is no way this is ancient and there is no way anyone would have ever used this beyond a drunk day out... It's a fucking log with a seat. It's probably heavy as all hell and it would probably ride barely above the water line. That aside. I think it's rad and wish the dude who made it would step up and tell a story.

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[–] hangry 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

A little research and you would not come off as an ignorant niggerfaggot. "Officials from the Florida Department of State’s Bureau of Archeological Research in the Division of Historical Resources said they are working to preserve the the canoe, estimated to weigh 600 to 700 pounds." The Bureau of Archeological Research should have checked with you first and saved themselves the trouble.

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[–] ElDulce 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

A state spokesperson said the canoe is still being evaluated, but they’ve already noticed square nails, remnants of paint chips and the fact that it was likely buried and unexposed to the elements in the river.

Clearly ancient, dude. Read the fucking article and you won't sounds like an ignorant little bitch.

http://www.winknews.com/2017/09/14/hurricane-irma-unearths-ancient-canoe-in-indian-river-in-brevard/

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[–] Pawn 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I don't see you making boats that are any better.

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[–] ElDulce 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

That is a fair point. I think it's cool that someone made the thing, but I'm just saying that a 500lb boat isn't all that practical.