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[–] Womb_Raider 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Permaculture is the best way of life! People should let their farm land lay fallow like the good old days.

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[–] dingomeat 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

You don't need to buy GMO seeds. If you want to grow GMO, take the seeds from your grocery store food and grow them.

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[–] middle_path [S] 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

This doesn't nessesarily apply to everything in the grocery store. I actually think very little of the vegetables in the store are GMOs.

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[–] Dumb_Comment_Bot 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Hey I just saw this, I think it would be nice thing to get a discussion going. I guess there are two ways to look at growing food and one is "grow it for yourself" and "grow it for others". When you grow it for yourself I think all these ethics are perfectly reasonable but once you have to start to grow food for others, break even, compete economically... imo things start to fall apart a little bit.

Soil care is obviously important, but I feel that your take on chemical fertilizer is a little weird. There are three types of "fertilizers" that we use. First is organic waste which is what you would expect it to be: rotting food, compost, plant material. There simply is not enough organic waste produced to make up for nutrients displaced in every application if you consider the fact that we export thousands of kilos of organic material off of it every week. Second is that organic waste requires burying if you want to use the land right away, which unnecessarily disturbs the soil (obviously to be avoided). If you can, you let it rot on top, but you can't always do that or you lose money on the implicit cost of the land. Lastly is disease transfer. Organic waste is full of molds and such (because these are the types of things to get thrown away). If you are dumping rotten onions you can't do it anywhere near where you plan on planting something susceptible to what rotted them in the first place.

Next we may use manure. There are two major drawbacks to manure. First is that you have to buy it and its not cheap (nutrient to price value), especially factoring in the cost of spreading it. The second drawback is the contamination. You can't sell food with a lot of shit in it (literally). In order to work around this, you have to let manure sit on your fields, usually over the fall and winter. While this is reasonable for spring crops its not reasonable to crops that are harvested very late like potatoes.

Third, we use your everyday ordinary N K P fertilizers. While you still have to buy this and its not cheap, it has its benefits too. It doesn't disturb the soil, its doesn't affect the food like manure as long as you don't "burn" your crops. You can fertilize over planted crops.

I could get into to pesticides and GMOS too.

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[–] middle_path [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

You don't have to agree with everything I say, but those are my ethics. If the world demands crops that "require" chemical intervention, than perhaps we should look at different crops.

We have done this for thousands of years without chemical fertilizers, so obviously there are methods that don't involve them. I'm out to prove that for the home gardener you don't need these things.

Also, manure can be free from the right person - I don't pay a dime since I know someone with horses who has a shit ton of manure. A lot of it is already aged as well. A home gardener could also have chickens or rabbits to provide manure at very little cost if managed properly.

And let's not get into pesticides or GMOs. If you want to have a whole debate, go over to v/gardening. I don't approve of their use and I have guests coming over tonight, so I would rather not get into all this now.

There may be times when -cides and fertilizers may be the only option, but marketing is making the home gardener and commercial farmer use way more than nessesary.

The point is, this shit is going to run out. It may be a while off, but why wait? We are not starving and we have time to expirament with organic methods, ancient man managed and I think with all our research and technology we can do it too. I have read a lot of books from a lot of authors who do not use chemicals or GMOs. Yet the produce an abundance of food. I know this is possible.