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[–] Sire 0 points 8 points (+8|-0) ago  (edited ago)

  • Break in your boots properly. It takes about 30 miles, divided over a couple hikes.
  • Wool socks are great against blisters. Merino wool = less stinky, pricey, but very durable.
  • Dress in layers, so depending on the temperature and he intensity, take off or put on a layer.
  • Know your comfort-level of physical hygiene. It's ok not to shower for a couple days, so you're be fine taking only very basic items: toothbrush, toothpaste, general purpose (biodegradable) soap, maybe deodorant.
  • More of that: bring few, but the right clothes. For 4 days 6-8 hours hiking steep hills and mountains in 75-86 degree sunshine, I take 2 pairs of underwear, 2+1 pairs of socks (1 spare), 1 pair of shorts, 1 pair of long pants, 2 shirts, 1 sweater, 1 jacket.
  • Bring some first aid: bandaids, iodine, pain killer, hand alcohol, needle and thread.
  • Check the weather beforehand, so anticipate what to bring, clothing wise, and you'll be more comfortably mentally.

Check with your bf if he's bringing the same items, so you'll avoid unnecessary weight.

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[–] 1WinfieldBlue 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Break in your boots properly.

This

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[–] Sire 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

And bring some blister tape/proper sports tape.

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[–] oddjob 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I found that wearing a pair of liner socks inside the wool socks really made things more comfortable. Feet felt like they stayed drier.

Also, make sure you have plenty of water and that there will be a source of potable water on the hike.

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[–] Sire 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Good tip. It may work, as more wool absorbs more moisture. On that note, letting your feet air out every lunch stop reduces the chance of blisters hugely.

Some people (including a mountain guide I met) don't believe the two-layer sock, but I'm comfy as using it to reduce friction, and changing socks of different thickness out to adjust to temperatures.

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[–] HWY__395 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

check the weather beforehand

Oh yeah.

The Japanese guy I picked up yesterday said he was either extremely hot or freezing. I don't think he was all that prepared.

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[–] 9461787 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

WAT?

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[–] DammitMoonMoon 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

I'm more of a day hiker, not necessarily a backpacking enthusiast. I can tell you the things I do to make life better while on a trail.

  • pack beef jerky, trail mix and/or protein bars. These take up very little space but can give you good bursts of energy. I also like to pick up those Jasons Nutbutters in the little squeeze packs because, again, they don't take up a lot of space, can be opened and squeezed while hiking and give you a good dose of energy.

  • Obviously pack drinking water. A camelback works best for this.

  • Bug spray for your body, mosquito netting if mosquitoes are an issue in your region. Trust me, no matter what you want bug spray. Spray your whole body before you set out on your hike.

  • A small package of wetwipes are handy for cleaning hands. I go cheap here and get store brand baby wipes, put a good amount in a ziplock bag.

  • a roll of TP. Flatten it. You're going to have to pee and poop in the woods. If you need tips on this let me know. Your boyfriend won't be able to explain to a girl how to pee in the woods.

  • I always find a good, longish, sturdy branch to use as a walking stick. You might not think it's important but they are very nice to have if you are traversing rocky terrain or on a decline.

* Wear good, sturdy shoes with good tracts on the bottom. I carry a container of Bandaid Friction Block to rub on areas of my feet that may blister.

  • Sunscreen

  • A small first aid kit

  • Extra socks

  • A rain poncho (can find these in the sporting goods department of most stores. You don't need anything expensive just something to throw on in case it starts raining)

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[–] 1WinfieldBlue 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I was completely green when I started, first hike was 2 weeks long, the learning curve was steep lol.

There's so much to say so I'll just say a little.

First off all enjoy yourself! Some of the best times in my life was in the outdoors.

You'll sometimes hear athletes talk about hitting "the wall" where you're so exhausted and everything seems fucked. Don't let yourself get to this point, it's hard to come back from. If you start feeling like you're getting to that point, stop take a break, have a cup of tea or coffee and chill for 30min, you'll be fine after that.

How much does your pack weigh?

You won't be a dead weight mate, I bet you'll have a great time. :)

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[–] fortuitouslyunfallen 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago 

I read somewhere, I can't remember where, that if you are hiking over a number of days, have a plan of how many miles/k's you want to cover in a day. Keep to that distance. Make sure that it isn't too much. It may not be relevant in this instance, but it was in comparison to trying to go as far as you possibly can, but you will burn yourself out and won't cover as much distance in the long run.

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[–] 1WinfieldBlue 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Sounds like pretty good advice if you're doing long distance hikes.

My general motto is "20/20". Carry around a 20kg pack and walk 20km give or take a day.

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[–] Hall_of_Cost 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Lol I packed cotton clothes and jeans on my first trip. It sucked!

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[–] 1WinfieldBlue 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Lmao each to there own, 10yrs of hiking jungle and snow covered Alps and I still wear jeans :p

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[–] Tree_Snake 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Check everything that has been left unattended for scorps, spiders and snakes. Don't try to kill or move a snake unless you're sure of its impotence and/or you intend to eat it. Snakebite kits are less than worthless.

Long, loose fitting, light colored cotton clothing is best for arid heat. Sleeves block the sun and increase surface area for the evaporation of sweat.

Spend some money on socks and boots.

Since your going with an SO, keep the hostilities to a minimum. No matter what's going on out there, a shitty attitude will not fix things. A fight can lead to death out there.

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[–] crshed 1 points 4 points (+5|-1) ago 

Some sort of all spice seasoning for the fish might be alright. Mainly, bring your smile and you won't be dead weight.

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[–] DammitMoonMoon 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

To add to this comment OP, here's a nifty tip for carrying seasonings in limited space. Since you're going to be fishing I would say lemon pepper is a good seasoning to go with. This is not my blog, just one I have saved because of its good tips.

Tic Tacs containers for seasonings

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[–] R34p_Th3_Wh0r1w1nd 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Bring a gun.

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[–] Hall_of_Cost 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Pro tip: line your pack with a trash bag. Keeps the water out for cheap in case of rain.

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[–] Hall_of_Cost 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

Scentless wipes in case you gotta poop. I hate not being able to get a good wipe in the back country. How are you filtering water? I use the katadyn hiker pumper and pump one and a half liters. I don't carry more than one and a half liters unless I'm in an area with little water, then I carry two liters.

Edit: cutting a water bottle toward the bottom at an angle will help you to pee without taking your pants to your ankels. My ex wife did this once when she lost her whiz-ease thingy. She kept the whiz device in a ziploc with some tp. The water bottle was too big for this and I think she just had to put it in grocery bag. Always pack extra plastic bags. They weigh nothing and take up little space.

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