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[–] Alopix 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

I'm guessing the list would be larger if "eco-consciousness" weren't the first concern.

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[–] RiverWind [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

There are laptops from Minifree with Intel chips. These are still quite eco-friendly, as they are refurbished to be free.

There aren't many free options at all, eco-conscious or otherwise.

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[–] lkcl 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

ethical is the primary - and only - concern.

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[–] NervousHorse 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Why is it that the price-to-performance ratio on these kind of freedom respecting devices is always horrible? I can see the low power consumption being appealing to people who would power it with a solar panel, but why pay 500+ for this when you can get a Thinkpad X200 for less than a hundred?

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[–] RiverWind [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

One reason why it tends to be more expensive to purchase a device which RYF (Respects Your Freedom) is because of economies of scale. Most people are unfortunately not concerned about sacrificing their freedom, due to lack of awareness. They just want shiny, and the mass market can make things more cheaply in bulk.

Another reason is that it is in the manufacturer's vested interests to take your freedom. One way to do that is to tempt people with "performance", playing down the loss in freedom that is incurred.

If there were a better performing piece of hardware that RYF at the same price, which do you think people would buy? It is not in the manufacturer's interests to let such a situation arise.

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[–] NervousHorse 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Well, in this case most of the price comes from the housing and other parts which don't even affect the performance. And $700 extra for assembly? I know there's not a huge demand for free hardware (at least not yet), but it would be nice if something like this could be a potential option for more than just the free software/hardware crowd, especially since the modularity and upgradeability might appeal even to the average consumer and the price of the computer card itself is actually within reasonable.

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[–] lkcl 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

the thinkpad x200 was a mass-produced device that is now second-hand, and reliability of the remaining X200's by people who have long-term experience with them is known to be... very very poor.

riverwind thank you for pointing out that mass-volume manufacturing has totally different priorities. the EOMA68 concept is designed to take advantage of this. imagine that this goes to mass-volume production. you would be able to buy the laptop housing at mass-volume pricing, wouldn't you? but, then, you would be able also to buy an RYF-Certified Computer Card (bear in mind that it's really small and not very expensive at all to make, relatively speaking), it would be in smaller volumes and so would cost more but you would in NO WAY be paying for an ENTIRE LAPTOP at small-volume pricing.

do you see how that strategy would work?

now all we need is: for the crowd-funding campaign to get off the ground, i.e. for people to back it so that i can get to the mass-volume phase and thus - at a later date - bring people the option described above.

i remind people that crowd funding is about backing ideas (with a gift) and being rewarded (with a gift) for doing so. it's a gift economy. you are not "buying products under contract of sale". that's what shops are for.

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[–] DillHoleBagHands 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

My thoughts exactly. "Eco-consciousness" is like the Prius of the computer world.

Sure sounds nice, but in reality, actually rolling turd wagon.

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[–] RiverWind [S] 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

The eco-consciousness becomes more fun if you imagine living off-grid somwhere. If you have to derive all your power for the day from some solar panels or getting on a sort of exercise bike generator, then lower power requirements are really cool.

Also, when one realizes that almost everything built/'engineered' today is defective by design, one wants to take action. Things ought to last! We ought to be able to make things that will be usable well into the future, instead of having to work to repurchase them. Also, Save the Planet!

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[–] lkcl 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Things ought to last!

... and when they do, you save a hell of a lot of money. it's funny, y'know: i worked out a while ago that "eco" actually equates directly with "amount of money spent". if you buy something for $100, it had to have a lot less environmental damage gone into its manufacture than something that cost $1,000. plain and simple. bear in mind that if you give someone $1,000, you just empowered them to [potentially] wreak more environmental damage than if they hadn't profited as much.

there's been social studies done which show that as a group, people just don't care about "eco" as much as they should. but say to them "this will save you money!" and they go "yippeee!".

so. long-term the EOMA68 strategy saves you money. there. it's that simple :)

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[–] lkcl 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

ooooo i'm gonna tell my momma you compared the EOMA68 project to a Prius - the car which has batteries that have polluted the factory where they're made for a HUNDRED miles in all directions, with the heavy metals used in its manufacture.

the "Asus Bamboo" computer is the Prius of the computer world. that's just a standard "obsolete by design" computer with a marketing-gimmick casework slapped on top of it.

the EOMA68 project is designed completely to be easily and safely upgraded, repaired and maintained - by you - so that over its projected and much-extended lifetime it costs you a HELL of a lot less money. even the old computer cards can be re-purposed in other devices. you can sell them on ebay.

... do you know of any computer (laptop or otherwise) that can claim that? any at all? tomorrow i'll be publishing a list of the ones that i know of and have encountered over the past 10 years, so if you know of any please do let me know and i will analyse them and add them to the list.

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[–] RiverWind [S] 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Weight! That is another BIG advantage.

This laptop's total weight is 1.1 Kg. The average weight of even the lightest laptop is over twice that.

The reason the eco-friendly laptop can do this is because it doesn't need the pipes, fans and heatsinks that a more power hungry laptop requires. Most of the weight of the eco-laptop is easily the led panel.