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[–] jiggawatt 0 points 16 points (+16|-0) ago 

Build your own! The cheapest way to build an AR is to avoid upgrading things buying parts you've already bought. The AR15 goes together like legos, although you may want a gunsmith to seat your barrel and headspace it to your bolt.

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[–] JunOS 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago  (edited ago)

I would say yes to this as well. Buying one ready to go is great and all, but building it from scratch is way cheaper and it's a pretty fun project!

There are stores that offer classes that will provide the parts and will teach you how to build it as well, usually those are cheaper than budget buys and it allows you the knowledge to swap out parts later since you know how it all goes togrther.

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[–] Awful-Falafel 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

What do you think about the Anderson stripped lowers? They are the most economical one I can get a hold of. Also, do I need it to be forged?

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[–] z0m0 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Anderson are great lowers. The finish might not be as nice as more expensive ones, and you don't get things like threaded spring holes for the saftey and rear take down pin, but it's a fine milspec receiver. I have a rifle and pistol build that are doing great and I have two more of their stripped lowers in the safe for future builds.

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[–] babydontBRRRTme 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

What is the benefit of having a gunsmith 'seat' your barrel?

Edit: also, how does a gunsmith 'headspace' a bolt to an AR barrel? The barrel extension is what ultimately determines headspace, right? If the barrel extension is out of spec, what is the gunsmith going to do to correct it?

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[–] jiggawatt 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

headspacing is a function of the barrel + the bolt. Theoretically both should be manufactured to spec and everything should fall in.

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[–] jiggawatt 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

Headspacing the barrel to the bolt is important. It should be OKAY for someone to just bolt a barrel on in the vast majority of cases that's fine. However, there's a real chance of danger if your barrel is not headspaced properly, the explosion from the bullet would be uncontained and you could blow apart your receiver and hurt yourself.

It's pretty safe to do it yourself, I did... but you should be aware of the danger and at least have an understanding of what you're doing. The headspacing is the only really critical part of building an AR15, the rest is legos.

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[–] Plavonica 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Just about to pull the trigger on this one myself once the semester is over.

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[–] PhatBastard 0 points 10 points (+10|-0) ago 

You should build your own, it's easier than you think. Then you will have a better understanding of how the gun actually works, what's involved in maintaining the gun, and you will also save a lot of money. Plus its easier to customize to fit your particular style, accessories like better barrel shroud, vertical foregrip, single point sling, extended trigger guard, peep sight, etc, etc. Owning the gun is not enough, you must practice how to service it/clean it/repair it all in the field. And you should shoot at least 1000 rounds from it without issue before you consider the gun reliable and the gun owner experienced. Then join a shooting organization that protects your constitutional right to defend yourself and your property from both civilian and government criminals. Some criminals wear a mask, some where a $10,000 suit.

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[–] Plavonica 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

And you should shoot at least 1000 rounds from it

So 2-3 days at the range?

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[–] PhatBastard 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Sure whatever your schedule allows. One outing if you can afford it, but everyone has a different schedule/budget. A lot of people dont get enough shooting time, especially if you live in a country with restrictive gun laws. In Canada citizens aren't even allowed to fire that type of weapon on private property. You can only use a range for "restricted" weapons. I personally use my back yard in a rural community, making it easier for me to practice than others who for example live in the city.

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[–] OricaTonithos 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thats like $300 (at least) in ammo! Unless you find a GV in a ditch somewhere with a 1.4 placard on it...

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[–] Awful-Falafel 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Asked another person as well in this thread, but what do you think about the Anderson stripped lowers? Do I need a forged lower?

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[–] Rellik88 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Anderson lowers are great. Just built me a AR with one. No issues.

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[–] kr1t1kl 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Any aluminum (not polymer) lower is fine and will last forever.

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[–] PhatBastard 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Honestly I'm not extremely knowledgeable on the quality control of all firearm manufactures. I have a trusted firearms dealer who has a lot of experience and I respect his opinions and recommendations. I reccommend shopping at smaller store with more helpful/personal advice from an experienced salesperson/owner, versus the knuckleheads at say a big box store like Dicks. You have to do your consumer research like you would on any important purchase like a new car or computer for example. It is my understanding/experience though that the lowers are usually not where issues reside, I'd be more worried about my upper receiver and associated parts. I've had problems in the past with the bolt/firing pin causing misfires, on BRAND NEW rifle. Not a good feeling, which is why I stress lots of range time to work out any kinks and prove the reliability factor, as much as you can afford. Which at almost 50 cents a round (depending on what brand) can get expensive quick so be sure to plan accordingly with your budget. Also building the rifle will make you more knowledgeable, enabling you to deal with technical issues that may arise in the field. A gun that doesn't fire/slash has no ammo is not a benefit... It's a burden.

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[–] Tubesbestnoob 0 points 5 points (+5|-0) ago 

Palmetto state armory usually has good deals. Good rifles for the price.

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[–] spyder228 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

This is definitely the route to go. Building from scratch for your first go around probably isn't the best idea if you've never used the platform before. Buying a complete upper and complete lower, that's OP ticket.

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[–] zaitcev 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago 

Echo is not the cheapest Del Ton. I'd just get a Ruger AR instead at that point.

As far as building one's own, I don't think it's going to save anything. The armorer wrench alone is $75. It is a fun project and I highly recommend it, but not for financial reasons.

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[–] FireMarshallBill 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

You're out of your mind to pay for some $75 Gucci wrench. EBay that shit for less than $15. Even if you didn't want to put the thing together yourself, you could buy a separate compete upper and lower that just slap together for at least a hundred less than even the Ruger.

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[–] gentronseven 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I don't think you should build your own unless you've already done similar projects in the past and have a lot of confidence. My first AR was a Colt in the $700 range and it's literally never had a malfunction after thousands of rounds shooting mostly tulammo.

I preferred it this way because I'm not mechanically adept and I just wanted something basic that works where I know the problems aren't because I screwed it up.

Also, the way I see it, on your first gun of a type, you don't know what you like yet. I liked it how it came out of the box. I'm not one to usually change anything on my guns, though.

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[–] RugerLCP_2 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago  (edited ago)

From the research I've done the smith and wesson sport 2 is probably the best budget AR. It has a dust cover and a few other things a budget AR doesn't normally have I think. A great mid is the smith and wesson M&P®15 TS which I think has chrome lined bcg, barrel etc and is $1000 with a military discount (find a friend who is ex military etc). Otherwise high end ARs are daniel defense, bravo / bcm, beretta, etc.

A lot of stuff to consider between part quality, barrel length and rail length etc. The more you know exactly how you want to use it the more you can fine tune it. If you want the military's definition for multipurpose, the M4A1 14.5" barrel with half barrel length rails is what you want.

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[–] RandomGoater 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

That advice is a quick route to a felony. Don't ever buy a gun for someone else, or have someone buy it for you. Please don't screw yourself over a couple bucks.

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[–] Plavonica 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

You can't buy guns as a gift?

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[–] RugerLCP_2 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

has to be a way you can legally transfer ownership

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[–] Demonsweat2 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

Aero precision produces budget friendly ar platforms. Also, compare the gun shops price with what is available online.

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[–] Fuck_SRS [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Thanks for all the advice guys. I do plan on doing a build in the future, this go round just trying to get my feet wet.

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[–] mpwilson 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I had planned on building my first, but bought the ruger instead. I figure I'll just keep modding it until I can put the original ruger back together with spare parts :).

That way I get going on the platform quicker and can take my time finding pieces & parts I really like rather than jumping in with no knowledge just so I can get an AR for $1.35.

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[–] ButterBar 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

I'm doing my first build (also first AR), and the advice I was given by an experienced friend is to buy a complete barreled upper. A lower will be a lot easier to build (think moving parts, but not tweaking gas systems). Palmetto state armory always has complete build kits at a good price point ~400, and all that's missing is a stripped lower.

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